Results for 'E. Garrard'

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  1.  6
    What is the Role of the Research Ethics Committee?: Paternalism, Inducements, and Harm in Research Ethics.E. Garrard & A. Dawson - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (7):419-423.
    In a recent paper Edwards, Kirchin, and Huxtable have argued that research ethics committees are often wrongfully paternalistic in their approach to medical research. They argue that it should be left to competent potential research subjects to make judgments about the acceptability of harms and benefits relating to research, and that this is not a legitimate role for any REC. They allow an exception to their overall antipaternalism, however, in that they think RECs should have the power to prohibit the (...)
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  2.  36
    Passive Euthanasia.E. Garrard & S. Wilkinson - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (2):64-68.
    The idea of passive euthanasia has recently been attacked in a particularly clear and explicit way by an “Ethics Task Force” established by the European Association of Palliative Care in February 2001. It claims that the expression “passive euthanasia” is a contradiction in terms and hence that there can be no such thing. This paper critically assesses the main arguments for the Task Force’s view. Three arguments are considered. Firstly, an argument based on the wrongness of euthanasia and the permissibility (...)
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  3.  34
    What is the Role of the Research Ethics Committee? Paternalism, Inducements, and Harm in Research Ethics.E. Garrard - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (7):419-423.
    In a recent paper Edwards, Kirchin, and Huxtable have argued that research ethics committees (RECs) are often wrongfully paternalistic in their approach to medical research. They argue that it should be left to competent potential research subjects to make judgments about the acceptability of harms and benefits relating to research, and that this is not a legitimate role for any REC. They allow an exception to their overall antipaternalism, however, in that they think RECs should have the power to prohibit (...)
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  4.  71
    Passive Euthanasia.E. Garrard - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (2):65-68.
    The idea of passive euthanasia has recently been attacked in a particularly clear and explicit way by an “Ethics Task Force” established by the European Association of Palliative Care in February 2001. It claims that the expression “passive euthanasia” is a contradiction in terms and hence that there can be no such thing. This paper critically assesses the main arguments for the Task Force’s view. Three arguments are considered. Firstly, an argument based on the wrongness of euthanasia and the permissibility (...)
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  5.  5
    Slote on Virtue.E. Garrard - 2000 - Analysis 60 (3):280-284.
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  6.  71
    Bodily Integrity and the Sale of Human Organs.S. Wilkinson & E. Garrard - 1996 - Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (6):334-339.
    Existing arguments against paid organ donation are examined and found to be unconvincing. It is argued that the real reason why organ sale is generally thought to be wrong is that (a) bodily integrity is highly valued and (b) the removal of healthy organs constitutes a violation of this integrity. Both sale and (free) donation involve a violation of bodily integrity. In the case of the latter, though, the disvalue of the violation is typically outweighed by the presence of other (...)
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  7.  17
    Appropriating the Past: Philosophical Perspectives on the Practice of Archaeology.Geoffrey Scarre & Robin Coningham (eds.) - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction Geoffrey Scarre and Robin Coningham; Part I. Claiming the Past: 2. The values of the past James O. Young; 3. Whose past? archaeological knowledge, community knowledge, and the embracing of conflict Piotr Bienkowski; 4. The past people want: heritage for the majority? Cornelius Holtorf; 5. The ethics of repatriation: rights of possession and duties of respect Janna Thompson; 6. On archaeological ethics and letting go Larry J. Zimmerman; 7. Hintang and the dilemma of benevolence: (...)
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  8. In Defence of Unconditional Forgiveness.Eve Garrard & David McNaughton - 2003 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 103 (1):39–60.
    In this paper, the principal objections to unconditional forgiveness are canvassed, primarily that it fails to take wrongdoing seriously enough, and that it displays a lack of self-respect. It is argued that these objections stem from a mistaken understanding of what forgiveness actually involves, including the erroneous view that forgiveness involves some degree of condoning of the offence, and is incompatible with blaming the offender or punishing him. Two positive reasons for endorsing unconditional forgiveness are considered: respect for persons and (...)
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  9. The Nature of Evil.Eve Garrard - 1998 - Philosophical Explorations 1 (1):43 – 60.
    We readily claim that great moral catastrophes such as the Holocaust involve evil in some way, although it' not clear what this amounts to in a secular context. This paper seeks to provide a secular account of what evil is. It examines what is intuitively the most plausible account, namely that the evil act involves the production of great suffering (or other disvalue), and argues that such outcomes are neither necessary nor sufficient for an act to be evil. Only an (...)
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  10. Evil as an Explanatory Concept.Eve Garrard - 2002 - The Monist 85 (2):320-336.
    On the day on which Dr Harold Shipman, the Manchester serial killer, was convicted, there was wall-to-wall coverage of it in the media. During the course of one of the many reports, the daughter of one of his victims was interviewed, and asked for her views on why Shipman had acted as he did. What she said was this: she’d tried and tried to understand or explain his deeds, and she could only come to the conclusion that he was a (...)
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  11.  97
    Hope and Terminal Illness: False Hope Versus Absolute Hope.Eve Garrard & Anthony Wrigley - 2009 - Clinical Ethics 4 (1):38-43.
    Sustaining hope in patients is an important element of health care, allowing improvement in patient welfare and quality of life. However in the palliative care context, with patients who are terminally ill, it might seem that in order to maintain hope the palliative care practitioner would sometimes have to deceive the patient about the full nature or prospects of their condition by providing a ‘false hope’. This possibility creates an ethical tension in palliative practice, where the beneficent desire to improve (...)
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  12.  40
    Speak No Evil?1.Eve Garrard & David McNaughton - 2012 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 36 (1):1-17.
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  13. G. E. Moore: Selected Writings.G. E. Moore - 1993 - Routledge.
    G.E. Moore, more than either Bertrand Russell or Ludwig Wittgenstein, was chiefly responsible for the rise of the analytic method in twentieth-century philosophy. This selection of his writings shows Moore at his very best. The classic essays are crucial to major philosophical debates that still resonate today. Amongst those included are: * A Defense of Common Sense * Certainty * Sense-Data * External and Internal Relations * Hume's Theory Explained * Is Existence a Predicate? * Proof of an External World (...)
     
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  14.  27
    Alternatives to the Grandmother Hypothesis.Beverly I. Strassmann & Wendy M. Garrard - 2011 - Human Nature 22 (1-2):201-222.
    We conducted a meta-analysis of 17 studies that tested for an association between grandparental survival and grandchild survival in patrilineal populations. Using two different methodologies, we found that the survival of the maternal grandmother and grandfather, but not the paternal grandmother and grandfather, was associated with decreased grandoffspring mortality. These results are consistent with the findings of psychological studies in developed countries (Coall and Hertwig Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33:1-59, 2010). When tested against the predictions of five hypotheses (confidence of (...)
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  15. Forgiveness.Eve Garrard & David McNaughton - 2010 - Routledge.
    Forgiveness usually gets a very good press in our culture: we are deluged with self-help books and television shows all delivering the same message, that forgiveness is good for everyone, and is always the right thing to do. But those who have suffered seriously at the hands of others often and rightly feel that this boosterism about forgiveness is glib and facile. Perhaps forgiveness is not always desirable, especially where the wrongdoing is terrible or the wrongdoer unrepentant. In this book, (...)
     
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  16.  43
    Facts, Freedom and Foreknowledge: E. M. Zemach and D. Widerker.E. M. Zemach - 1987 - Religious Studies 23 (1):19-28.
    Is God's foreknowledge compatible with human freedom? One of the most attractive attempts to reconcile the two is the Ockhamistic view, which subscribes not only to human freedom and divine omniscience, but retains our most fundamental intuitions concerning God and time: that the past is immutable, that God exists and acts in time, and that there is no backward causation. In order to achieve all that, Ockhamists distinguish ‘hard facts’ about the past which cannot possibly be altered from ‘soft facts’ (...)
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  17.  96
    Review: The Work of E. T. Jaynes on Probability, Statistics and Statistical Physics. [REVIEW]E. T. Jaynes, D. A. Lavis & P. J. Milligan - 1985 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 36 (2):193 - 210.
    An important contribution to the foundations of probability theory, statistics and statistical physics has been made by E. T. Jaynes. The recent publication of his collected works provides an appropriate opportunity to attempt an assessment of this contribution.
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  18. VKnowledge Activation: Accessibility, Applicability, and Salience, V in E. Tory Higgins and Arie W. Kruglanski, Eds.E. T. Higgins - 1996 - In E. E. Higgins & A. Kruglanski (eds.), Social Psychology: Handbook of Basic Principles. Guilford.
     
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  19.  54
    Essays in Conceptual Analysis.Antony Garrard Newton Flew (ed.) - 1956 - New York: St. Martin's Press.
    This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be (...)
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  20.  78
    Mapping Moral Motivation.Eve Garrard & David McNaughton - 1998 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 1 (1):45-59.
    In this paper we defend a version of moral internalism and a cognitivist account of motivation against recent criticisms. The internalist thesis we espouse claims that, if an agent believes she has reason to A, then she is motivated to A. Discussion of counter-examples has been clouded by the absence of a clear account of the nature of motivation. While we can only begin to provide such an account in this paper, we do enough to show that our version of (...)
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  21.  90
    Two Notions of Being: Entity and Essence: E. J. Lowe.E. J. Lowe - 2008 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 62:23-48.
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  22.  32
    Natural Kinds: T. E. Wilkerson.T. E. Wilkerson - 1988 - Philosophy 63 (243):29-42.
    What is a natural kind ? As we shall see, the concept of a natural kind has a long history. Many of the interesting doctrines can be detected in Aristotle, were revived by Locke and Leibniz, and have again become fashionable in recent years. Equally there has been agreement about certain paradigm examples: the kinds oak, stickleback and gold are natural kinds, and the kinds table, nation and banknote are not. Sadly agreement does not extend much further. It is impossible (...)
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  23.  55
    Substance and Selfhood: E. J. Lowe.E. J. Lowe - 1991 - Philosophy 66 (255):81-99.
    How could the self be a substance? There are various ways in which it could be, some familiar from the history of philosophy. I shall be rejecting these more familiar substantivalist approaches, but also the non-substantival theories traditionally opposed to them. I believe that the self is indeed a substance—in fact, that it is a simple or noncomposite substance—and, perhaps more remarkably still, that selves are, in a sense, self-creating substances. Of course, if one thinks of the notion of substance (...)
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  24.  71
    Forgiveness and the Holocaust.Eve Garrard - 2002 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 5 (2):147-165.
    This paper considers whether we have any reason to forgive the perpetrators of the most terrible atrocities, such as the Holocaust. On the face of it, we do not have reason to forgive in such cases. But on examination, the principal arguments against forgiveness do not turn out to be persuasive. Two considerations in favour of forgiveness are canvassed: the presence of rational agency in the perpetrators, and the common human nature which they share with us. It is argued that (...)
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  25.  11
    Eve Garrard and David McNaughton , Forgiveness . Reviewed By.Jennifer Davis - 2012 - Philosophy in Review 32 (5):379-380.
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  26.  94
    Review Article: The War Against the Enlightenment.Graeme Garrard - 2011 - European Journal of Political Theory 10 (2):277-286.
  27.  66
    A C.E. Real That Cannot Be SW-Computed by Any Ω Number.George Barmpalias & Andrew E. M. Lewis - 2006 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 47 (2):197-209.
    The strong weak truth table (sw) reducibility was suggested by Downey, Hirschfeldt, and LaForte as a measure of relative randomness, alternative to the Solovay reducibility. It also occurs naturally in proofs in classical computability theory as well as in the recent work of Soare, Nabutovsky, and Weinberger on applications of computability to differential geometry. We study the sw-degrees of c.e. reals and construct a c.e. real which has no random c.e. real (i.e., Ω number) sw-above it.
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  28.  32
    The Index Set $\{E: WE \equiv1 X\}$.E. Herrmann - 1986 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 51 (1):110 - 116.
    Let X be any infinite, coinfinite r.e. set. We show that the index set $\{e: W_e \equiv_1 X\}$ is Σ 0 3 -complete, answering a question posed by Odifreddi in [2].
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  29. Counter-Enlightenments: From the Eighteenth Century to the Present.Graeme Garrard - 2005 - Routledge.
    The Enlightenment and its legacy are still actively debated, with the Enlightenment acting as a key organizing concept in philosophy, social theory and the history of ideas. Counter-Enlightenments is the first full-length study to deal with the history and development of the Counter-Enlightenment thought from its inception in the eighteenth century right through to the present. Engaging in a critical dialogue with Isiah Berlin's work, this book analyses the concept of Counter-Enlightenment and some of the most important conceptual issues and (...)
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  30.  2
    Bioethics of Public Commenting: Manipulation, Data Risk, and Public Participation in E-Rulemaking.Jonathan Beever & Lakelyn E. Taylor - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (1):18-24.
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  31.  63
    Conhecimento e identidade histórica em Sartre.Franklin Leopoldo E. Silva - 2003 - Trans/Form/Ação 26 (2):43-64.
    O presente texto procura acompanhar alguns aspectos da reconstrução sartreana das relações entre indivíduo e história, tentando mostrar que a fenomenologia e o materialismo dialético comparecem nessa proposta de conhecimento e que é a convergência das duas perspectivas que permite, contemplando adequadamente a universalidade e a singularidade, descrever e compreender dialeticamente o modo histórico de produção da identidade individual.
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  32. The Problem of the Empirical Basis: E. G. Zahars.E. G. Zahar - 1995 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 39:45-74.
    In this paper I shall venture into an area with which I am not very familiar and in which I feel far from confident; namely into phenomenology. My main motive is not to get away from standard, boring, methodological questions like those of induction and demarcation; but the conviction that a phenomenological account of the empirical basis forms a necessary complement to Popper's falsificationism. According to the latter, a scientific theory is a synthetic and universal, hence unverifiable proposition. In fact, (...)
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  33. Conhecimento e Opinião em Aristóteles (Segundos Analíticos I-33).Lucas Angioni - 2013 - In Marcelo Carvalho (ed.), Encontro Nacional Anpof: Filosofia Antiga e Medieval. Anpof. pp. 329-341.
    This chapter discusses the first part of Aristotle's Posterior Analytics A-33, 88b30-89a10. I claim that Aristotle is not concerned with an epistemological distinction between knowledge and belief in general. He is rather making a contrast between scientific knowledge (which is equivalent to explanation by the primarily appropriate cause) and some explanatory beliefs that falls short of capturing the primarily appropriate cause.
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  34.  37
    Personal Agency: E. J. Lowe.E. J. Lowe - 2003 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 53:211-227.
    Why does the problem of free will seem so intractable? I surmise that in large measure it does so because the free will debate, at least in its modern form, is conducted in terms of a mistaken approach to causality in general. At the heart of this approach is the assumption that all causation is fundamentally event causation. Of course, it is well-known that some philosophers of action want to invoke in addition an irreducible notion of agent causation, applicable only (...)
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  35.  35
    Joseph de Maistre's Civilization and its Discontents.Graeme Garrard - 1996 - Journal of the History of Ideas 57 (3):429-446.
  36. GARRARD, The Historical Jesus. [REVIEW]H. G. Wood - 1956 - Hibbert Journal 55:98.
     
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  37.  8
    The Index Set {E: We ≡1X}.E. Herrmann - 1986 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 51 (1):110-116.
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  38.  95
    Slote on Virtue.Eve Garrard - 2000 - Analysis 60 (3):280–284.
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  39.  15
    Structure and Deterioration of Semantic Memory: A Neuropsychological and Computational Investigation.Timothy T. Rogers, Matthew A. Lambon Ralph, Peter Garrard, Sasha Bozeat, James L. McClelland, John R. Hodges & Karalyn Patterson - 2004 - Psychological Review 111 (1):205-235.
  40.  31
    The Principles of Mechanics. Edited by D.E. Jones and James Walley.E. A. Singer, Henrich Hertz, D. E. Jones & J. T. Walley - 1900 - Philosophical Review 9 (6):676.
  41.  24
    Essays on Logic and Language.Antony Garrard Newton Flew (ed.) - 1951 - New York, NY, USA: Oxford, Eng.Blackwell.
  42.  33
    I—Helen E. Longino.Helen E. Longino - 1997 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (1):19-35.
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  43.  50
    Equality of Talent: John E. Roemer.John E. Roemer - 1985 - Economics and Philosophy 1 (2):151-188.
    If one is an egalitarian, what should one want to equalize? Opportunities or outcomes? Resources or welfare? These positions are usually conceived to be very different. I argue in this paper that the distinction is misconceived: the only coherent conception of resource equality implies welfare equality, in an appropriately abstract description of the problem. In this section, I motivate the program which the rest of the paper carries out.
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  44.  58
    E-Z Reader 7 Provides a Platform for Explaining How Low- and High-Level Linguistic Processes Influence Eye Movements.Gary E. Raney - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (4):498-499.
    E-Z Reader 7 is a processing model of eye-movement control. One constraint imposed on the model is that high-level cognitive processes do not influence eye movements unless normal reading processes are disturbed. I suggest that this constraint is unnecessary, and that the model provides a sensible architecture for explaining how both low- and high-level processes influence eye movements.
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  45. Zettel. Edited by G.E.M. Anscombe and G.H. Von Wright.Ludwig Wittgenstein, G. E. M. Anscombe & G. H. von Wright - 1967 - Blackwell.
     
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  46.  22
    Miracles and Laws of Nature: E. J. LOWE.E. J. Lowe - 1987 - Religious Studies 23 (2):263-278.
    Hume's famous discussion of miracles in the Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding is curious both on account of the arguments he does deploy and on account of the arguments he does not deploy, but might have been expected to. The first and second parts of this paper will be devoted to examining, respectively, these two objects of curiosity. The second part I regard as the more important, because I shall there try to show that the fact that Hume does not deploy (...)
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  47. Passioni, Interessi, Convenzioni Discussioni Settecentesche Su Virtù E Civiltà.Maria Luisa Pesante, Marco Geuna, Eugenio Lecaldano, Sergio Cremaschi, Luigi Turco, Nadia Boccara, Dario Castiglione, Adelino Zanini, David Wootton, Alfonso M. Iacono, John G. A. Pocock, Guido Abbattista, Edoardo Tortarolo, Gabriella Valera, Enzo Pesciarelli, Riccardo Bellofiore, Andrea Ginzburg, Marco E. L. Guidi & Manuela Albertone - 1992 - Milano: Franco Angeli.
    Il riconoscimento che lo sviluppo della società commerciale consente un inaudito dispiegamento delle potenzialità dell'uomo nella storia, ma al tempo stesso mina la sua capacità di agire come cittadino - in altre parole la tensione tra virtù e civiltà - è un tema ricorrente nella cultura inglese e scozzese del Settecento, che è stato al centro della ricerca storiografica degli ultimi due decenni. Questa prospettiva si è rivelata fruttuosa per rileggere le controversie politiche, economiche e filosofiche di quel momento cruciale (...)
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  48.  43
    Cultura E Crisi Permanente: La ‘Xenia’ Dionisiaca. [REVIEW]R. E. Witt - 1972 - The Classical Review 22 (2):287-288.
  49.  17
    The Crooked Timber of Humanity: Chapters in the History of Ideas. [REVIEW]Graeme Garrard - 1992 - History of European Ideas 14 (2):284-284.
  50.  12
    I.—Review of Dr. E. Husserl's Philosophy of Arithmetic. [REVIEW]E. W. Kluge - 1972 - Mind 81 (323):321-337.
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