53 found
Order:
  1.  16
    The Clinical Investigator as Fiduciary: Discarding a Misguided Idea.E. Haavi Morreim - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (3):586-598.
    One of the most important questions in the ethics of human clinical research asks what obligations investigators owe the people who enroll in their studies. Research differs in many ways from standard care - the added uncertainties, for instance, and the nontherapeutic interventions such as diagnostic tests whose only purpose is to measure the effects of the research intervention. Hence arises the question whether a physician engaged in clinical research has the same obligations toward research subjects that he owes his (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  2.  22
    The Clinical Investigator as Fiduciary: Discarding a Misguided Idea.E. Haavi Morreim - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (3):586-598.
    One of the most important questions in the ethics of human clinical research asks what obligations investigators owe the people who enroll in their studies. Research differs in many ways from standard care - the added uncertainties, for instance, and the nontherapeutic interventions such as diagnostic tests whose only purpose is to measure the effects of the research intervention. Hence arises the question whether a physician engaged in clinical research has the same obligations toward research subjects that he owes his (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  3.  17
    Enough Wiggle RoomBalancing Act: The New Medical Ethics of Medicine's New Economics.David C. Hadorn & E. Haavi Morreim - 1992 - Hastings Center Report 22 (6):43.
  4.  35
    Litigation in Clinical Research: Malpractice Doctrines Versus Research Realities.E. Haavi Morreim - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (3):474-484.
    Human clinical research trials, by which corporations, universities, and research scientists bring new drugs, devices, and procedures into the practice and marketplace of medicine, have become a huge business. The National Institutes of Health doubled its spending over the past five years, while in the private sector the top twenty pharmaceutical companies have more than doubled their investment in research and development over a roughly comparable period. To date, some twenty million Americans have participated in clinical research trials that now (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  5.  7
    Litigation in Clinical Research: Malpractice Doctrines Versus Research Realities.E. Haavi Morreim - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (3):474-484.
    Human clinical research trials, by which corporations, universities, and research scientists bring new drugs, devices, and procedures into the practice and marketplace of medicine, have become a huge business. The National Institutes of Health doubled its spending over the past five years, while in the private sector the top twenty pharmaceutical companies have more than doubled their investment in research and development over a roughly comparable period. To date, some twenty million Americans have participated in clinical research trials that now (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  6.  21
    Taking a Lesson From the Lawyers: Defining and Addressing Conflict of Interest.E. Haavi Morreim - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (1):33 - 34.
  7.  91
    A Dose of Our Own Medicine: Alternative Medicine, Conventional Medicine, and the Standards of Science.E. Haavi Morreim - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (2):222-235.
    The discussion about complementary and alternative medicine is sometimes rather heated. “Quackery!” the cry goes. A large proportion “of unconventional practices entail theories that are patently unscientific.” “It is time for the scientific community to stop giving alternative medicine a free ride. There cannot be two kinds of medicine — conventional and alternative. There is only medicine that has been adequately tested and medicine that has not, medicine that works and medicine that may or may not work.” “I submit that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  8.  13
    High‐Profile Research and the Media: The Case of the Abio‐Cor Artificial Heart.E. Haavi Morreim - 2004 - Hastings Center Report 34 (1):11-24.
  9.  32
    The Impossibility and the Necessity of Quality of Life Research.E. Haavi Morreim - 1992 - Bioethics 6 (3):219–232.
  10.  28
    A Dose of Our Own Medicine: Alternative Medicine, Conventional Medicine, and the Standards of Science.E. Haavi Morreim - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (2):222-235.
    The discussion about complementary and alternative medicine is sometimes rather heated. “Quackery!” the cry goes. A large proportion “of unconventional practices entail theories that are patently unscientific.” “It is time for the scientific community to stop giving alternative medicine a free ride. There cannot be two kinds of medicine — conventional and alternative. There is only medicine that has been adequately tested and medicine that has not, medicine that works and medicine that may or may not work.” “I submit that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  11.  13
    Profoundly Diminished Life The Casualties of Coercion.E. Haavi Morreim - 1994 - Hastings Center Report 24 (1):33-42.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  12.  64
    The Concept of Harm Reconceived: A Different Look at Wrongful Life. [REVIEW]E. Haavi Morreim - 1988 - Law and Philosophy 7 (1):3 - 33.
    In wrongful life litigation a congenitally impaired child brings suit against those, usually physicians, whose negligence caused him to be born into his suffering existence. A key conceptual question is whether we can predicate harm in such cases. While a few courts have permitted it, many courts deny that we can, and thus have refused these children standing to sue. In this article the author examines the wrongful life cases and literature enroute to a broader consideration of harm. This literature, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  13.  12
    About Face: Downplaying the Role of the Press in Facial Transplantation Research.E. Haavi Morreim - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (3):27 – 29.
  14.  14
    Of Rescue and Responsibility: Learning to Live with Limits.E. Haavi Morreim - 1994 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (5):455-470.
    Universal access to health care is still a dream rather than a reality in the United States. This is partly because a rule of rescue, by impelling us to help people in need, urges us to ignore the limits of our health care policies wherever those limits would adversely affect a given individual. As the rule of rescue undermines whatever limits we set on health care entitlements, it can thwart the cost containment so essential to expanding access. Rather than accept (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  15.  7
    Cost Containment: Challenging Fidelity and Justice.E. Haavi Morreim - 1988 - Hastings Center Report 18 (6):20-25.
  16. Bioethics and the Press.E. Haavi Morreim - 1999 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (2):101-107.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  17. Cost Containment: Issues of Moral Conflict and Justice for Physicians.E. Haavi Morreim - 1985 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 6 (3).
    In response to rapidly rising health care costs in the United States, federal and state governments and private industry are instituting numerous and diverse cost-containment plans. As devices for coping with a scarcity of resources, such plans present serious challenges to physicians' traditional single-minded devotion to patient welfare. Those which contain costs by directly limiting medical options or by controlling physicians' daily clinical decisions can threaten the quality of medical care by allowing economic authorities to make essentially medical judgments. In (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  18.  16
    Cost Constraints as a Malpractice Defense.E. Haavi Morreim - 1988 - Hastings Center Report 18 (1):5-10.
  19.  39
    Innovation in Human Research Protection: The AbioCor Artificial Heart Trial.E. Haavi Morreim, George E. Webb, Harvey L. Gordon, Baruch Brody, David Casarett, Ken Rosenfeld, James Sabin, John D. Lantos, Barry Morenz, Robert Krouse & Stan Goodman - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (5):W6-W16.
  20.  15
    Quality of Life: Erosions and Opportunities Under Managed Care.E. Haavi Morreim - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (2):144-158.
    In recent years a number of commentators have discussed the importance of measuring quality of life in health care. We want to know whether an intervention will help people to live better, not just longer, and whether some treatments cause more trouble than they are worth. New technologies promise wondrous benefits. But when millions of people have no insured access to health care, and when many others face increasingly stringent limits on care, technologies’ high costs require us to choose what (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  21.  9
    Quality of Life: Erosions and Opportunities Under Managed Care.E. Haavi Morreim - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (2):144-158.
    In recent years a number of commentators have discussed the importance of measuring quality of life in health care. We want to know whether an intervention will help people to live better, not just longer, and whether some treatments cause more trouble than they are worth. New technologies promise wondrous benefits. But when millions of people have no insured access to health care, and when many others face increasingly stringent limits on care, technologies’ high costs require us to choose what (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  22. End-Stage Heart Disease, High-Risk Research, and Competence to Consent: The Case of the AbioCor Artificial Heart.E. Haavi Morreim - 2006 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 49 (1):19-34.
  23.  21
    Result-Based Compensation in Health Care: A Good, But Limited, Idea.E. Haavi Morreim - 2001 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 29 (2):174-181.
    David Hyman and Charles Silver are quite right. Opinion 6.01 in the American Medical Association's Code of Medical Ethics is difficult to defend. Ties between compensation and outcomes need not mislead patients into thinking that results are guaranteed; they are widely used in other fields with considerable success, even if they have some disadvantages; they can potentially bring patients more actively into decision-making about whether and from whom to purchase which medical care; and, if carefully tuned, they can promote quality (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  24.  32
    Moral Justice and Legal Justice in Managed Care: The Ascent of Contributive Justice.E. Haavi Morreim - 1995 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 23 (3):247-265.
    Several prominent cases have recently highlighted tension between the interests of individuals and those of the broader population in gaining access to health care resources. The care of Helga Wanglie, an elderly woman whose family insisted on continuing life support long after she had lapsed into a persistent vegetative state, cost approximately $750,000, the majority of which was paid by a Medi-gap policy purchased from a health maintenance organization. Similarly, Baby K was an anencephalic infant whose mother, believing that all (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  25. Philosophy Lessons From the Clinical Setting: Seven Sayings That Used to Annoy Me.E. Haavi Morreim - 1986 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 7 (1).
    Traditional medical approaches to moral issues found in the clinical setting can, if properly understood, enlighten our philosophical understanding of moral issues. Moral problem-solving, as distinct from ethical and metaethical theorizing, requires that one reckon with practical complexities and uncertainties. In this setting the quality of one's answer depends not so much upon its content as upon the quality of reasoning which supports it. As the discipline which especially focuses upon the attributes of good-quality reasoning, philosophy therefore has much to (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26.  13
    Result-Based Compensation in Health Care: A Good, but Limited, Idea.E. Haavi Morreim - 2001 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 29 (2):174-181.
    David Hyman and Charles Silver are quite right. Opinion 6.01 in the American Medical Association's Code of Medical Ethics is difficult to defend. Ties between compensation and outcomes need not mislead patients into thinking that results are guaranteed; they are widely used in other fields with considerable success, even if they have some disadvantages; they can potentially bring patients more actively into decision-making about whether and from whom to purchase which medical care; and, if carefully tuned, they can promote quality (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  27.  14
    Lifestyles of the Risky and Infamous: From Managed Care to Managed Lives.E. Haavi Morreim - 1995 - Hastings Center Report 25 (6):5-12.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  28.  6
    Patient-Funded Research: Paying the Piper or Protecting the Patient?E. Haavi Morreim - 1990 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 13 (3):1-6.
  29.  25
    Conception and the Concept of Harm.E. Haavi Morreim - 1983 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 8 (2):137-158.
    In recent years, science and the courts have created new options whereby prospective parents can avoid the birth of a diseased or defective child. We can ascertain the likelihood that certain genetic diseases will be transmitted; We can detect a number of fetal abnormalities in utero ; we have legal permission to abort for any reason, including fetal abnormality. With these new options come new questions concerning our moral obligations toward our prospective offspring. An important conceptual question concerns whether such (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30.  9
    Moral Justice and Legal Justice in Managed Care: The Ascent of Contributive Justice.E. Haavi Morreim - 1995 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 23 (3):247-265.
    Several prominent cases have recently highlighted tension between the interests of individuals and those of the broader population in gaining access to health care resources. The care of Helga Wanglie, an elderly woman whose family insisted on continuing life support long after she had lapsed into a persistent vegetative state, cost approximately $750,000, the majority of which was paid by a Medi-gap policy purchased from a health maintenance organization. Similarly, Baby K was an anencephalic infant whose mother, believing that all (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31.  4
    The Impossibility and the Necessity of Quality of Life Research.E. Haavi Morreim - 1992 - Bioethics 6 (3):219-232.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32.  4
    Impairments and Impediments in Patients' Decision Making: Reframing the Competence Question.E. Haavi Morreim - 1993 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 4 (4):294.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  9
    A Roadmap for Health Care AccountabilityHolding Health Care Accountable: Law and the New Medical Marketplace.Frances H. Miller & E. Haavi Morreim - 2003 - Hastings Center Report 33 (2):46.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  5
    Alternative Health Care: Limits of Science and Boundaries of Access.E. Haavi Morreim - 2002 - In Rosamond Rhodes, Margaret P. Battin & Anita Silvers (eds.), Medicine and Social Justice: Essays on the Distribution of Health Care. Oup Usa. pp. 319.
  35.  1
    Am I My Brother's Warden? Responding to the Unethical or Incompetent Colleague.E. Haavi Morreim - 1993 - Hastings Center Report 23 (3):19-27.
  36.  5
    Am I Rotheris Warden?E. Haavi Morreim - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  5
    Another Kind of End-Run: Status Upgrades.E. Haavi Morreim - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (4):11 – 12.
  38.  3
    Assessing Quality of Care: New Twists From Managed Care.E. Haavi Morreim - 1999 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 10 (2):88.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  96
    Access Without Excess.E. Haavi Morreim - 1992 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (1):1-6.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  18
    Beyond the Lies: Solving the Problem.E. Haavi Morreim - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):61-63.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Colleague.E. Haavi Morreim - 1993 - Hastings Center Report 23 (3):9.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  17
    Civil Disobedience: The Devil is in the Details.E. Haavi Morreim - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (4):4-4.
  43.  1
    Clinicians or Committees: Who Should Cut Costs?E. Haavi Morreim - 1987 - Hastings Center Report 17 (2):45-45.
  44. Holding Health Care Accountable: Law and the New Medical Marketplace.E. Haavi Morreim - 2001 - Oup Usa.
    Tort and contract law have not kept pace with the stunning changes in medicine's economics. Physicians are still expected to deliver the same standard of care to everyone, regardless whether it is paid for. Health plans increasingly face liability for unfortunate outcomes, even those stemming from society's mandate to keep costs down while improving population health. This book sorts through the chaos. After reviewing the inadequacies of current tort and contract law, Morreim proposes that an intelligent assignment of legal liability (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  45.  11
    Physician Investment and Self-Referral: Philosophical Analysis of a Contentious Debate.E. Haavi Morreim - 1990 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 15 (4):425-448.
    A new economic phenomenon, in which physicians refer their patients to ancillary facilities of which they themselves are owners or substantial investors, presents a ‘laboratory’ for assessing philosophers' potential contributions to public policy issues. In this particular controversy, ‘prohibitionists’ who wish to ban all such self-referral focus on the dangers that patients and payers may receive or be billed for unnecessary or poor-quality care. ‘Laissez-fairists’, in contrast, argue that self-referral should be freely permitted, with a reliance on personal ethics and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  5
    Result-Based Compensation in Health Care: A Good, But Limited, Idea.E. Haavi Morreim - 2001 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 29 (1):174-181.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  13
    Stratified Scarcity: Redefining the Standard of Care.E. Haavi Morreim - 1989 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 17 (4):356-367.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  11
    Stratified Scarcity: Redefining the Standard of Care.E. Haavi Morreim - 1989 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 17 (4):356-367.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  2
    The MD and the DRG.E. Haavi Morreim - 1985 - Hastings Center Report 15 (3):30-38.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  18
    The New Economics of Medicine: Special Challenges for Psychiatry.E. Haavi Morreim - 1990 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 15 (1):97-119.
    The ongoing economic overhaul of medicine creates two basic imperatives – boosting profits and containing costs – that pose special ethical and philosophical challenges for psychiatry. Because insurance coverage still favors inpatient care, pressures to raise renevues translate into a corresponding pressure on psychiatry as a whole to expand its diagnostic categories, and on individual psychiatrists to ascribe these diagnoses liberally and to hospitalize as many patients as possible. Reciprocally, cost containment requires all physicians to justify their care as clearly (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 53