34 found
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  1.  41
    Literature, Ethical Thought Experiments, and Moral Knowledge.E. M. Dadlez - 2013 - Southwest Philosophy Review 29 (1):195-209.
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  2. Truly Funny: Humor, Irony, and Satire as Moral Criticism.E. M. Dadlez - 2011 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (1):1-17.
    Comparatively speaking, philosophy has not been especially long-winded in attempting to answer questions about what is funny and why we should think so. There is the standard debate of many centuries’ standing between superiority and incongruity accounts of humor, which for the most part attempt to identify the intentional objects of our amusement.1 There is the more recent debate about humor and morality, about whether jokes themselves may be regarded as immoral or about whether it can in certain circumstances be (...)
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  3.  19
    Post‐Abortion Syndrome: Creating an Affliction.E. M. Dadlez & William L. Andrews - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (9):445 - 452.
    The contention that abortion harms women constitutes a new strategy employed by the pro-life movement to supplement arguments about fetal rights. David C. Reardon is a prominent promoter of this strategy. Post-abortion syndrome purports to establish that abortion psychologically harms women and, indeed, can harm persons associated with women who have abortions. Thus, harms that abortion is alleged to produce are multiplied. Claims of repression are employed to complicate efforts to disprove the existence of psychological harm and causal antecedents of (...)
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  4. Fiction, Emotion, and Rationality.E. M. Dadlez - 1996 - British Journal of Aesthetics 36 (3):290-304.
  5.  40
    Post-Abortion Syndrome: Creating an Affliction.E. M. Dadlez & William L. Andrews - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (9):445-452.
    The contention that abortion harms women constitutes a new strategy employed by the pro-life movement to supplement arguments about fetal rights. David C. Reardon is a prominent promoter of this strategy. Post-abortion syndrome purports to establish that abortion psychologically harms women and, indeed, can harm persons associated with women who have abortions. Thus, harms that abortion is alleged to produce are multiplied. Claims of repression are employed to complicate efforts to disprove the existence of psychological harm and causal antecedents of (...)
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  6.  10
    Comment on “Standing Conditions and Blame” by Amy McKiernan.E. M. Dadlez - 2016 - Southwest Philosophy Review 32 (2):49-52.
  7.  43
    Not Moderately Moral: Why Hume Is Not a "Moderate Moralist".E. M. Dadlez & Jeanette Bicknell - 2013 - Philosophy and Literature 37 (2):330-342.
    If philosophers held popularity contests, David Hume would be a perennial winner. Witty, a bon vivant, and champion of reason over bigotry and superstition, it is not surprising that many contemporary thinkers want to recruit him as an ally or claim his views as precursors to their own. In the debate over the moral content of artworks and its possible relevance for artistic and aesthetic value, the group whose views are known variously as “ethicism,” “moralism,” or “moderate moralism” has claimed (...)
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  8.  2
    Hume, Halos, and Rough Heroes: Moral and Aesthetic Defects in Works of Fiction.E. M. Dadlez - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1):91-102.
    The starting point of this paper is a recent exchange in the Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism1 that pits moderate moralism against robust immoralism and has Humean antecedents. I will proceed by agreeing in part with both, but fully with neither, thereby annoying as many people as possible in one go. I believe, with Anne Eaton, the proponent of robust immoralism, that fictions which valorize what she calls "rough heroes" can arouse both aesthetically compelling and morally troubling reactions. On (...)
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  9.  23
    Index to Volume 45.Dina Zoe Belluigi, Michael Belshaw, Michael Benton, Deborah Bradley, Bert Cardullo, Janine Certo, Wayne Brinda, Leslie Cunliffe, E. M. Dadlez & Rhett Diessner - 2011 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (4).
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  10.  13
    Spectacularly Bad: Hume and Aristotle on Tragic Spectacle.E. M. Dadlez - 2005 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (4):351–358.
  11.  11
    Fictional Objects, Future Objectives: Why Existence Matters Less Than You Think.E. M. Dadlez & C. M. Haramia - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (1):1-15.
    Beatrice. Jane Tennison. Elizabeth Bennett. Arya Stark. Katniss Everdeen. None of them is real. All of them appear not only to engage our interest but also to move us. Some of them might even be thought to affect us further—to inspire us to do things, or at least to regard things in a different light. The set of problems typically grouped under the designation “paradox of fiction” raises questions about an apparent contradiction, about our responding emotionally to entities and events (...)
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  12.  63
    Rape, Evolution, and Pseudoscience: Natural Selection in the Academy.E. M. Dadlez, William L. Andrews, Courtney Lewis & Marissa Stroud - 2009 - Journal of Social Philosophy 40 (1):75-96.
  13.  16
    Of Two Minds.E. M. Dadlez - 2002 - Southwest Philosophy Review 18 (1):185-192.
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  14.  13
    Ink, Art and Expression: Philosophical Questions About Tattoos.E. M. Dadlez - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (11):739-753.
    This essay offers an overview of the reasons why tattoos are philosophically interesting. Considered here will be a partial survey of potential areas of philosophical interest with respect to tattoos, fortified by a little historical context. Claims about the ethical significance of tattoos and about the significance of tattoos for self-expression and as expressions of identity will be canvassed in the first two sections, as will questions about what they express or signify, how they might do so, and whose expression (...)
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  15.  11
    When Complementarianism Becomes Gender Apartheid: Feminist Philosophers’ Objections to the Christian Right.Sarah H. Woolwine & E. M. Dadlez - 2014 - Southwest Philosophy Review 30 (1):195-203.
  16.  35
    Seeing and Imagination: Emotional Response to Fictional Film.E. M. Dadlez - 2010 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 34 (1):120-135.
  17.  10
    The Pleasures of Tragedy.E. M. Dadlez - 2013 - In James A. Harris (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century. Oxford University Press. pp. 450.
    There is a resurgence of Aristotelian concerns in philosophical approaches to tragedy in the eighteenth century. The philosophical literature of the period is rife with proposed solutions to the problem of the delightfulness of imitations of undelightful things and to the more specific problem of tragic pleasure. The latter include attempts to identify different objects of our pleasure and uneasiness as well as distinct attempts to explain how it is that pleasure can depend on such uneasiness. These areas of concern (...)
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  18.  10
    Pleased and Afflicted.E. M. Dadlez - 2004 - Hume Studies 30 (2):213-236.
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  19.  8
    Thinking Hypothetically About Hypothesis-Testing in the Humanities.E. M. Dadlez - 2015 - Southwest Philosophy Review 31 (1):21-28.
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  20.  12
    Knowing Setter.E. M. Dadlez - 2005 - Southwest Philosophy Review 21 (1):35-44.
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  21.  3
    WAXLER, ROBERT P. The Risk of Reading: How Literature Helps Us to Understand Ourselves and the World. New York: Bloomsbury, 2014, Vii + 191 Pp., $77.00 Cloth. [REVIEW]E. M. Dadlez - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (3):310-311.
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  22.  11
    Only Kidding.E. M. Dadlez - 2006 - Southwest Philosophy Review 22 (2):1-16.
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  23.  5
    Gender and Moral Virtue in Kant’s Critique of Judgment: The Third Critique as a Template for Identifying Feminine Deficit.Sarah Woolwine & E. M. Dadlez - 2015 - Southwest Philosophy Review 31 (1):109-118.
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  24.  5
    Comment on James Rocha, “Forced to Listen to the Heart”.E. M. Dadlez - 2014 - Southwest Philosophy Review 30 (2):51-54.
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  25.  19
    Aesthetics and Humean Aesthetic Norms in the Novels of Jane Austen.E. M. Dadlez - 2008 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 42 (1):46-62.
  26.  12
    The Beautiful and the Good.E. M. Dadlez - 1999 - Southwest Philosophy Review 15 (1):99-106.
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  27.  1
    Knowing Setter: The Epistemic Underpinnings of Moral Criticism of Fiction.E. M. Dadlez - 2005 - Southwest Philosophy Review 21 (1):35-44.
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  28.  1
    Only Kidding: The Connection Between Amusement and Our Attitudes.E. M. Dadlez - 2006 - Southwest Philosophy Review 22 (2):1-16.
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  29.  1
    Of Two Minds: Plato’s Analogy Between Painting and Poetry.E. M. Dadlez - 2002 - Southwest Philosophy Review 18 (1):185-192.
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  30.  1
    The Beautiful and the Good: A Common Sense and Point of View.E. M. Dadlez - 1999 - Southwest Philosophy Review 15 (1):99-106.
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  31.  5
    A Companion to the Philosophy of Literature Edited by Hagberg, Garry L. And Walter Jost.E. M. Dadlez - 2012 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (2):237-239.
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  32.  36
    Mirrors to One Another: Emotion and Value in Jane Austen and David Hume.E. M. Dadlez - 2009 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    A compelling exploration of the convergence of Jane Austen’s literary themes and characters with David Hume’s views on morality and human nature. Argues that the normative perspectives endorsed in Jane Austen's novels are best characterized in terms of a Humean approach, and that the merits of Hume's account of ethical, aesthetic and epistemic virtue are vividly illustrated by Austen's writing. Illustrates how Hume and Austen complement one another, each providing a lens that allows us to expand and elaborate on the (...)
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  33. Poetry Is What Gets Lost in Translation.E. M. Dadlez - 2013 - Sztuka I Filozofia (42).
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  34. Rights of Passage.Sarah H. Woolwine & E. M. Dadlez - 2016 - Res Philosophica 93 (4):951-969.
    This article responds to two ethical conundrums associated with the practice of disability passing. One of these problems is the question of whether or not passing as abled is morally wrong in that it constitutes deception. The other, related difficulty arises from the tendency of the able-bodied in contemporary society to reinforce the activity of passing despite its frequent condemnation as a form of pretense or fraud. We draw upon recent scholarship on transgender and disability passing to criticize and explore (...)
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