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  1.  7
    Heidegger: Through Phenomenology to Thought. [REVIEW]M. Z. E. - 1964 - Review of Metaphysics 18 (2):384-385.
    A book which might well become a classic on Heidegger. Richardson discusses most of Heidegger's works in chronological order, offering a close analysis of each. Most chapters include a general exposition of the argument of the work discussed, a detailed analysis of the problems of Thought, Being and Dasein in the work, and a résumé. While maintaining very high standards of scholarly precision in the rendering of Heidegger's ideas and terminology, Richardson yet succeeds in making his book very readable and (...)
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  2.  25
    Philosophy of Art. [REVIEW]M. Z. E. - 1964 - Review of Metaphysics 17 (4):623-623.
    A brief, non-technical, well-organized presentation of a system of aesthetics which makes use of insights typical of various Gestalt psychologists and phenomenologists but claims Wittgenstein and the school of language analysis as its only source of influence. Works of art as well as the materials the artist uses are subject to "aspection" and "animation" by various images, such that "each material is featured as a little, elementary aesthetic object." Aldrich offers a theory of evaluations and normative descriptions of works of (...)
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  3.  5
    Philosophies of Art and Beauty: Selected Readings in Aesthetics From Plato to Heidegger. [REVIEW]M. Z. E. - 1967 - Review of Metaphysics 20 (4):743-743.
    Unlike most anthologies in aesthetics and the philosophy of art, the present selection does not try to collect representative extracts from the writings of most, or even many, important aestheticians throughout the ages. It aims for depth rather than width and tries to do as much justice as possible to those aestheticians which it does include, without bothering much about those left out. The result is really impressive. No less than 138 pages are devoted to Plato and Aristotle alone, where (...)
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  4.  24
    Truth and Art. [REVIEW]M. Z. E. - 1965 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (2):376-377.
    The book can be roughly divided in two parts. The first four chapters criticize several previous systems of aesthetics, notably those of Cassirer, Croce, and their followers, and suggest an alternative based upon an interesting extension of the recently, much-discussed theory of direct perception as a "seeing-as." Hofstadter would use this model of interpretative-perception to explicate the nature of language as well. A cry will not be, thus, an "expression" of pain but rather present the pain directly; it would articulate (...)
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  5.  11
    The Meaning of Proper Names, with a Definiens Formula for Proper Names in Modern English. [REVIEW]M. Z. E. - 1967 - Review of Metaphysics 20 (4):733-734.
    The first six chapters of this book present and criticize six views of the nature of proper names, among which are theories that proper names have no meaning or connotation, that proper names have more meaning than other signs or that their meaning is infinite, that ordinary proper names should be analysed into "logically" proper names, etc. This part of the book is the best. One may find in these chapters several well-reasoned arguments which seem to totally demolish the theories (...)
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  6.  13
    The Structure of Aesthetics. [REVIEW]M. Z. E. - 1964 - Review of Metaphysics 18 (1):185-185.
    A collection of commentaries on various theories in aesthetics, similar in method and aim to Kainz's Vorlesungen. Far from placing "the study of aesthetics on a new footing" or grasping "the scope of the subject as a whole," as the dust jacket declares, it is still a useful, well organized and often illuminating manual for the student of aesthetics. Sparshott treats some problems clearly and succinctly, but many other questions, such as the mode of being of the work of art (...)
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