11 found
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  1.  6
    Adverbial sensing.E. W. Van Steenburgh - 1987 - Mind 96 (383):376-380.
  2.  1
    On spiking the imitation regress.E. W. Van Steenburgh - 1974 - Apeiron 8 (1):27 - 30.
  3.  12
    Berkeley revisited.E. W. Van Steenburgh - 1963 - Journal of Philosophy 60 (4):85-89.
  4.  8
    Could an Impression Be a Process?E. W. Van Steenburgh - 1982 - Hume Studies 8 (2):139-148.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:139. COULD AN IMPRESSION BE A PROCESS? Processes are of two main kinds, depending on whether the process has or lacks culmination. I am concerned with non-culminating processes, e.g., with a burning fuse sans explosion. This is reported as secondary by any good dictionary, derived from the head, or culminating, sense of 'process'. An ontological criterion for 'process' is as follows: something is absolutely unchanging, if it is unchanging (...)
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  5. Durationless Moments in Hume’s Treatise.E. W. van Steenburgh - 1977 - In G. R. Morice (ed.), David Hume.
  6.  1
    Hume's Geometric.E. W. Van Steenburgh - 1980 - Hume Studies 6 (1):61-68.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:61. HUME'S GEOMETRIC "OBJECTS" Arithmetic and algebra allow of precision and certainty. The science of geometry is not likewise a perfect and infallible science. At any rate, this is Hume's teaching in the Treatise. When two numbers are so combin ' d, as that the one has always an unite answering to every unite of the other, we pronounce them equal; and 'tis for want of such a standard (...)
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  7.  3
    Hume's Geometric "Objects".E. W. Van Steenburgh - 1980 - Hume Studies 6 (1):61-68.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:61. HUME'S GEOMETRIC "OBJECTS" Arithmetic and algebra allow of precision and certainty. The science of geometry is not likewise a perfect and infallible science. At any rate, this is Hume's teaching in the Treatise. When two numbers are so combin ' d, as that the one has always an unite answering to every unite of the other, we pronounce them equal; and 'tis for want of such a standard (...)
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  8.  4
    Hume's Metaphysical Musicians.E. W. Van Steenburgh - 1992 - Hume Studies 18 (2):151-154.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Hume's Metaphysical Musicians E. W. Van Steenburgh Having argued to the possible existence ofmathematical points, Hume concedes that checking for their actual existence is difficult because of the minuteness. He writes: the points, which enter into the composition of any line or surface, whether perceiv'd by the sight or touch, are so minute and soconfoundedwith eachother, that'tis utterly impossible for the mind to compute their number.1 He concludesthat theirminutenessrenderspoints (...)
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  9.  1
    Hume's Ontology.E. W. Van Steenburgh - 1973 - Journal of Critical Analysis 4 (4):164-172.
  10.  6
    Metaphor.E. W. Van Steenburgh - 1965 - Journal of Philosophy 62 (22):678-688.
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  11.  1
    The Problem of Simple Resemblance.E. W. Van Steenburgh - 1974 - Philosophical Studies 25 (5):337-346.
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