Results for 'Ecology'

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  1. Ecological Laws.Ecological Laws - unknown
    The question of whether there are laws in ecology is important for a number of reasons. If, as some have suggested, there are no ecological laws, this would seem to distinguish ecology from other branches of science, such as physics. It could also make a difference to the methodology of ecology. If there are no laws to be discovered, ecologists would seem to be in the business of merely supplying a suite of useful models. These models would (...)
     
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  2. Culture/Power/History/Nature.Reimagining Political Ecology - 2006 - In Aletta Biersack & James B. Greenberg (eds.), Reimagining Political Ecology. Duke University Press.
     
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  3. Community, and Lifestyle, 144 and 159. Also see Sessions,".Ecology Naess - 2000 - Eco Philosophy, Utopias, and Education," and Arne Naess and Rob Jankling," Deep Ecology and Education: A Conversation with Arne Naess," Canadian Journal of Environmental Education 5.
     
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  4.  18
    What are the connections between realism, relativism, technology, and environmental ethics?C. Ecological Realism - 2010 - Environmental Ethics: The Big Questions 5:336.
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  5.  83
    The Science of the Struggle for Existence: On the Foundations of Ecology.Gregory John Cooper - 2003 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a sustained examination of issues in the philosophy of ecology that have been a source of controversy since the emergence of ecology as an explicit scientific discipline. The controversies revolve around the idea of a balance of nature, the possibility of general ecological knowledge and the role of model-building in ecology. The Science of the Struggle for Existence is also a detailed treatment of these issues that incorporates both a comprehensive investigation of the relevant (...)
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  6.  26
    Ecology, Policy, and Politics: Human Well-Being and the Natural World.John O'Neill - 1993 - Routledge.
    Revealing flaws in both 'green' and market-based approaches to environmental policy, O'Neill develops an Aristotolian account of well-being. He examines the implications for wider issues involving markets, civil society an.
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  7. The Cognitive Ecology of the Internet.Paul Smart, Richard Heersmink & Robert Clowes - 2017 - In Stephen Cowley & Frederic Vallée-Tourangeau (eds.), Cognition Beyond the Brain: Computation, Interactivity and Human Artifice (2nd ed.). Springer. pp. 251-282.
    In this chapter, we analyze the relationships between the Internet and its users in terms of situated cognition theory. We first argue that the Internet is a new kind of cognitive ecology, providing almost constant access to a vast amount of digital information that is increasingly more integrated into our cognitive routines. We then briefly introduce situated cognition theory and its species of embedded, embodied, extended, distributed and collective cognition. Having thus set the stage, we begin by taking an (...)
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  8. Ecology, Policy and Politics: Human Well-Being and the Natural World.John O'Neill - 1993 - Routledge.
    Revealing flaws in both 'green' and market-based approaches to environmental policy, O'Neill develops an Aristotolian account of well-being. He examines the implications for wider issues involving markets, civil society an.
     
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  9.  10
    Ecology, Policy and Politics: Human Well-Being and the Natural World.John O'Neill - 1993 - Environmental Values 4 (2):181-182.
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  10.  25
    Do Deconstructive Ecology and Sociobiology Undermine Leopold’s Land Ethic?J. Baird Callicott - 1996 - Environmental Ethics 18 (4):353-372.
    Recent deconstructive developments in ecology (doubts about the existence of unified communities and ecosystems, the diversity-stability hypothesis, and a natural homeostasis or “balance of nature”; and an emphasis on “chaos,” “perturbation,” and directionless change in living nature) and the advent of sociobiology (selfish genes) may seem to undermine the scientific foundations of environmental ethics, especially the Leopold land ethic. A reassessment of the Leopold land ethic in light of these developments (and vice versa) indicates that the land ethic is (...)
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  11. Radical Ecology.Carolyn Merchant - 1994 - Science and Society 58 (1):120-123.
  12. Semiotic ecology: different natures in the semiosphere.Kalevi Kull - 1998 - Sign Systems Studies 26 (1):344-371.
  13. Philosophical issues in ecology: Recent trends and future directions.Mark Colyvan, William Grey, Paul E. Griffiths, Jay Odenbaugh, Stefan Linquist & Hugh P. Possingham - 2009 - Ecology and Society 14 (2).
    Philosophy of ecology has been slow to become established as an area of philosophical interest, but it is now receiving considerable attention. This area holds great promise for the advancement of both ecology and the philosophy of science. Insights from the philosophy of science can advance ecology in a number of ways. For example, philosophy can assist with the development of improved models of ecological hypothesis testing and theory choice. Philosophy can also help ecologists understand the role (...)
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  14. Feminism and ecology: Making connections.Karen J. Warren - 1987 - Environmental Ethics 9 (1):3-20.
    The current feminist debate over ecology raises important and timely issues about the theoretical adequacy of the four leading versions of feminism-liberal feminism, traditional Marxist feminism, radical feminism, and socialist feminism. In this paper I present a minimal condition account of ecological feminism, or ecofeminism. I argue that if eco-feminism is true or at least plausible, then each of the four leading versions of feminism is inadequate, incomplete, or problematic as a theoretical grounding for eco-feminism. I conclude that, if (...)
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  15. Mechanisms in ecology.Viorel Pâslaru - 2017 - In Stuart Glennan & Phyllis McKay Illari (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Mechanisms and Mechanical Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 348-361.
    New mechanistic philosophy has not examined explanations in ecology although they are based extensively on describing mechanisms responsible for phenomena under scrutiny. This chapter uses the example of research on the shrub Lonicera maackii (Amur honeysuckle) to scrutinize individual-level mechanisms that are generally accepted and used in ecology and confronts them with the minimal account of mechanisms. Individual-level mechanisms are for a phenomenon, are hierarchical, and absent entities play a role in their functioning. They are distinguished by the (...)
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  16.  5
    The unconstructable earth: an ecology of separation.Frédéric Neyrat - 2019 - New York, NY: Fordham University Press.
    This book contributes to the environmental humanities field by offering an analysis of the Anthropocene fantasy: the idea that the Anthropocene is an opportunity to remake our terrestrial environment thanks to the power of technology. The author argues that the earth always escapes the human desire to remake and master it.
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  17.  41
    "Evolutionary Ecology" and the Use of Natural Selection in Ecological Theory.James P. Collins - 1986 - Journal of the History of Biology 19 (2):257 - 288.
  18.  26
    Evolutionary ecology and the use of natural selection in ecological theory.James P. Collins - 1986 - Journal of the History of Biology 19 (2):257-288.
  19. Eco-feminism and deep Ecology.Jim Cheney - 1987 - Environmental Ethics 9 (2):115-145.
    l examine the degree to which the so-called “deep ecology” movement embodies a feminist sensibility. In part one I take a brief look at the ambivalent attitude of “eco-feminism” toward deep ecology. In part two I show that this ambivalence sterns largely from the fact that deep ecology assimilates feminist insights to a basically masculine ethical orientation. In part three I discuss some of the ways in which deepecology theory might change if it adopted a fundamentally feminist (...)
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  20. Dialectics and reductionism in ecology.Richard Levins & Richard Lewontin - 1980 - Synthese 43 (1):47 - 78.
    Biology above the level of the individual organism ? population ecology and genetics, community ecology, biogeography and evolution ? requires the study of intrinsically complex systems. But the dominant philosophies of western science have proven to be inadequate for the study of complexity:(1)The reductionist myth of simplicity leads its advocates to isolate parts as completely as possible and study these parts. It underestimates the importance of interactions in theory, and its recommendations for practice (in agricultural programs or conservation (...)
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  21.  65
    Feminism, Deep Ecology, and Environmental Ethics.Jim Cheney - 1987 - Environmental Ethics 9 (1):21-44.
    Deep ecologists have criticized reform environmentalists for not being sufficiently radical in their attempts to curb human exploitation of the nonhuman world. Ecofeminists, however, maintain that deep ecologists, too, are not sufficiently radical, for they have neglected the cmcial role played by patriarchalism in shaping the cultural categories responsible for Western humanity’s domination of Nature. According to eco-feminists, only by replacing those categories-including atomism, hierarchalism, dualism, and androcentrism - can humanity learn to dweIl in harmony with nonhuman beings. After reviewing (...)
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  22. From Ecology To Autonomy.Cornelius Castoriadis - 1981 - Thesis Eleven 3 (1):8-22.
  23.  39
    The Idea of Wilderness: From Prehistory to the Age of Ecology.Max Oelschlaeger - 1991 - Yale University Press.
    How has the concept of wild nature changed over the millennia? And what have been the environmental consequences? In this broad-ranging book Max Oelschlaeger argues that the idea of wilderness has reflected the evolving character of human existence from Paleolithic times to the present day. An intellectual history, it draws together evidence from philosophy, anthropology, theology, literature, ecology, cultural geography, and archaeology to provide a new scientifically and philosophically informed understanding of humankind's relationship to nature. Oelschlaeger begins by examining (...)
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  24.  20
    Laws in ecology: Diverse modes of explanation for a holistic science.Richard Gunton & Francis Gilbert - 2017 - Zygon 52 (2):538-560.
    Ecology's reputation as a holistic science is partly due to widespread misconceptions of its nature as well as shortcomings in its methodology. This article argues that the pursuit of empirical laws of ecology can foster the emergence of a more unified and predictive science based on complementary modes of explanation. Numerical analyses of population dynamics have a distinguished pedigree, spatial analyses generate predictive laws of macroecology, and physical analyses are typically pursued by the ecosystem paradigm. The most characteristically (...)
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  25. Introductory Notes on an Ecology of Practices.Isabelle Stengers - 2005 - Cultural Studeis Review 11 (1):183-196.
    Prepared for an ANU Humanities Research Centre Symposium in early August 2003, these notes may be considered as a comment on Brian Massumi’s proposition that ‘a political ecology would be a social technology of belonging, assuming coexistence and co-becoming as the habitat of practices’.
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  26.  95
    Function in ecology: an organizational approach.Nei Nunes-Neto, Alvaro Moreno & Charbel N. El-Hani - 2014 - Biology and Philosophy 29 (1):123-141.
    Functional language is ubiquitous in ecology, mainly in the researches about biodiversity and ecosystem function. However, it has not been adequately investigated by ecologists or philosophers of ecology. In the contemporary philosophy of ecology we can recognize a kind of implicit consensus about this issue: while the etiological approaches cannot offer a good concept of function in ecology, Cummins’ systemic approach can. Here we propose to go beyond this implicit consensus, because we think these approaches are (...)
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  27. Do Deconstructive Ecology and Sociobiology Undermine Leopold’s Land Ethic?J. Baird Callicott - 1996 - Environmental Ethics 18 (4):353-372.
    Recent deconstructive developments in ecology (doubts about the existence of unified communities and ecosystems, the diversity-stability hypothesis, and a natural homeostasis or “balance of nature”; and an emphasis on “chaos,” “perturbation,” and directionless change in living nature) and the advent of sociobiology (selfish genes) may seem to undermine the scientific foundations of environmental ethics, especially the Leopold land ethic. A reassessment of the Leopold land ethic in light of these developments (and vice versa) indicates that the land ethic is (...)
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  28.  28
    Philosophical foundations for the practices of ecology.William A. Reiners - 2010 - New York: Cambridge University Press. Edited by Jeffrey Alan Lockwood.
    Ecologists use a remarkable range of methods and techniques to understand complex, inherently variable, and functionally diverse entities and processes across a staggering range of spatial, temporal and interactive scales. These multiple perspectives make ecology very different to the exemplar of science often presented by philosophers. In Philosophical Foundations for the Practices of Ecology, designed for graduate students and researchers, ecology is put into a new philosophical framework that engages with this inherent pluralism while still placing constraints (...)
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  29. The “balance of nature” metaphor and equilibrium in population ecology.Kim Cuddington - 2001 - Biology and Philosophy 16 (4):463-479.
    I claim that the balance of nature metaphoris shorthand for a paradigmatic view of natureas a beneficent force. I trace the historicalorigins of this concept and demonstrate that itoperates today in the discipline of populationecology. Although it might be suspected thatthis metaphor is a pre-theoretic description ofthe more precisely defined notion ofequilibrium, I demonstrate that balance ofnature has constricted the meaning ofmathematical equilibrium in population ecology.As well as influencing the meaning ofequilibrium, the metaphor has also loaded themathematical term with (...)
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  30. Introductory Notes on an Ecology of Practices.Isabelle Stengers - 2013 - Cultural Studies Review 11 (1).
    Prepared for an ANU Humanities Research Centre Symposium in early August 2003, these notes may be considered as a comment on Brian Massumi’s proposition that ‘a political ecology would be a social technology of belonging, assuming coexistence and co-becoming as the habitat of practices’.
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  31.  45
    An Ecology of Epistemic Authority.Lorraine Code - 2011 - Episteme 8 (1):24-37.
    I offer an examination of trust relations in scientific inquiry as they seem to contrast with a lack of trust in an example of knowledge imposed from above by an unaccountable institutional power structure. On this basis I argue for a re-reading of John Hardwig's account of the place of trust in knowledge, and suggest that it translates less well than social epistemologists and others have assumed into a model for democratic epistemic practice.
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  32. Unconventional Environmental Theories in the Face of Climate Change and Biodiversity Loss: Re-examination of Deep Ecology, VHEMT, and Primitivism.Viet-Phuong La, Minh-Hoang Nguyen & Quan-Hoang Vuong - manuscript
    Deep Ecology, the Voluntary Human Extinction Movement (VHEMT), and Anti-Civilization Primitivism have frequently been labeled as radical environmental ideologies, owing to their relationship with activities conducted by environmental extremists. Nonetheless, given the serious concerns faced by climate change and biodiversity loss, it is critical to engage with a broad range of perspectives and techniques. Such participation allows us to have access to a greater range of perspectives and a more diverse pool of knowledge, boosting our capacity for creative problem-solving. (...)
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  33. Feminism, Deep Ecology, and Environmental Ethics.Michael E. Zimmerman - 1987 - Environmental Ethics 9 (1):21-44.
    Deep ecologists have criticized reform environmentalists for not being sufficiently radical in their attempts to curb human exploitation of the nonhuman world. Ecofeminists, however, maintain that deep ecologists, too, are not sufficiently radical, for they have neglected the cmcial role played by patriarchalism in shaping the cultural categories responsible for Western humanity’s domination of Nature. According to eco-feminists, only by replacing those categories-including atomism, hierarchalism, dualism, and androcentrism - can humanity learn to dweIl in harmony with nonhuman beings. After reviewing (...)
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  34. To give and to give not: The behavioral ecology of human food transfers.Michael Gurven - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):543-559.
    The transfer of food among group members is a ubiquitous feature of small-scale forager and forager-agricultural populations. The uniqueness of pervasive sharing among humans, especially among unrelated individuals, has led researchers to evaluate numerous hypotheses about the adaptive functions and patterns of sharing in different ecologies. This article attempts to organize available cross-cultural evidence pertaining to several contentious evolutionary models: kin selection, reciprocal altruism, tolerated scrounging, and costly signaling. Debates about the relevance of these models focus primarily on the extent (...)
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  35. Ecology and opportunity: intergenerational equity and sustainable options.Bryan Norton - 1999 - In Andrew Dobson (ed.), Fairness and Futurity: Essays on Environmental Sustainability and Social Justice. Oxford University Press. pp. 118--150.
     
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  36. The Depth of Margaret Cavendish's Ecology.Peter West & Manuel Fasko - forthcoming - Ergo.
    This paper examines Margaret Cavendish’s ecological views and argues that, in the Appendix to her final published work, Grounds of Natural Philosophy (1668), Cavendish is defending a normative account of the way that humans ought to interact with their environment. On this basis, we argue that Cavendish is committed to a form of what, for the purposes of this paper, we will call ‘deep ecology,’ where that is understood as the view that humans ought to treat the rest of (...)
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  37.  98
    Feminism, Deep Ecology, and Environmental Ethics.Michael E. Zimmerman - 1987 - Environmental Ethics 9 (1):21-44.
    Deep ecologists have criticized reform environmentalists for not being sufficiently radical in their attempts to curb human exploitation of the nonhuman world. Ecofeminists, however, maintain that deep ecologists, too, are not sufficiently radical, for they have neglected the cmcial role played by patriarchalism in shaping the cultural categories responsible for Western humanity’s domination of Nature. According to eco-feminists, only by replacing those categories-including atomism, hierarchalism, dualism, and androcentrism - can humanity learn to dweIl in harmony with nonhuman beings. After reviewing (...)
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  38. 1. Ecology and ecosemiotics.Winfried Nöth - 1998 - Sign Systems Studies 26:332-343.
  39.  56
    On inference in ecology and evolutionary biology: The problem of multiple causes.Ray Hilborn & Stephen C. Stearns - 1982 - Acta Biotheoretica 31 (3):145-164.
    If one investigates a process that has several causes but assumes that it has only one cause, one risks ruling out important causal factors. Three mechanisms account for this mistake: either the significance of the single cause under test is masked by noise contributed by the unsuspected and uncontrolled factors, or the process appears only when two or more causes interact, or the process appears when there are present any of a number of sufficient causes which are not mutally exclusive. (...)
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  40. The deep ecology-ecofeminism debate and its parallels.Warwick Fox - 1989 - Environmental Ethics 11 (1):5-25.
    There has recently been considerable discussion of the relative merits of deep ecology and ecofeminism, primarily from an ecofeminist perspective. I argue that the essential ecofeminist charge against deep ecology is that deep ecology focuses on the issue of anthropocentrism (i.e., human-centeredness) rather than androcentrism (i.e., malecenteredness). I point out that this charge is not directed at deep ecology’s positive or constructive task of encouraging an attitude of ecocentric egalitarianism, but rather at deep ecology's negative (...)
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  41.  36
    The Future of Predictive Ecology.Alkistis Elliott-Graves - 2019 - Philosophical Topics 47 (1):65-82.
    Prediction is an important aspect of scientific practice, because it helps us to confirm theories and effectively intervene on the systems we are investigating. In ecology, prediction is a controversial topic: even though the number of papers focusing on prediction is constantly increasing, many ecologists believe that the quality of ecological predictions is unacceptably low, in the sense that they are not sufficiently accurate sufficiently often. Moreover, ecologists disagree on how predictions can be improved. On one side are the (...)
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  42. Social ecology: A philosophy of dialectical naturalism.John Clark - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy.
  43. Deep ecology.D. R. Keller - 2008 - In Baird Callicott & Robert Frodeman (eds.), Encyclopedia of Environmental Ethics and Philosophy. Macmillan Reference. pp. 206--211.
     
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  44.  21
    The beauty of sensory ecology.Elis Aldana & Fernando Otálora-Luna - 2017 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 39 (3):20.
    Sensory ecology is a discipline that focuses on how living creatures use information to survive, but not to live. By trans-defining the orthodox concept of sensory ecology, a serious heterodox question arises: how do organisms use their senses to live, i.e. to enjoy or suffer life? To respond to such a query the objective and emotional meaning of symbols must be revealed. Our program is distinct from both the neo-Darwinian and the classical ecological perspective because it does not (...)
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  45.  48
    Research perspectives and the anomalous status of modern ecology.Joel B. Hagen - 1989 - Biology and Philosophy 4 (4):433-455.
    Ecology has often been characterized as an immature scientific discipline. This paper explores some of the sources of this alleged immaturity. I argue that the perception of immaturity results primarily from the fact that historically ecologists have based their work upon two very different approaches to research.
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  46.  71
    The competition controversy in community ecology.Gregory Cooper - 1993 - Biology and Philosophy 8 (4):359-384.
    There is a long history of controversy in ecology over the role of competition in determining patterns of distribution and abundance, and over the significance of the mathematical modeling of competitive interactions. This paper examines the controversy. Three kinds of considerations have been involved at one time or another during the history of this debate. There has been dispute about the kinds of regularities ecologists can expect to find, about the significance of evolutionary considerations for ecological inquiry, and about (...)
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  47. Ecology and the inescapability of values.Jay Odenbaugh - 2008 - Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (4):593-596.
  48.  38
    Dōgen, Deep Ecology, and the Ecological Self.Deane Curtin - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (2):195-213.
    A core project for deep ecologists is the reformulation of the concept of self. In searching for a more inclusive understanding of self, deep ecologists often look to Buddhist philosophy, and to the Japanese Buddhist philosopher Dōgen in particular, for inspiration. I argue that, while Dōgen does share a nondualist, nonanthropocentric framework with deep ecology, his phenomenology of the self is fundamentally at odds with the expanded Self found in the deep ecology literature. I suggest, though I do (...)
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  49.  48
    Spinoza, Deep Ecology and Education Informed by a (Post)human Sensibility.Lesley Le Grange - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (9):878-887.
    This article explores the influence of Spinozism on the deep ecology movement and on new materialism. It questions the stance of supporters of the DEM because their ecosophies unwittingly anthropomorphise the more-than-human-world. It suggests that instead of humanising the ‘natural’ world, morality should be naturalised, that is, that the object of human expression of ethics should be the more-than-human world. Moreover, the article discusses Deleuze’s Spinozism that informs new materialism and argues that stripping the human of its ontological privilege (...)
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  50.  48
    Machine and ecology.Yuk Hui - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (4):54-66.
    This article investigates the relation between machine and ecology, and the philosophical and historical questions concealed in these two seemingly incompatible terms. The opposition between machin...
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