Results for 'Ecosystem management Congresses'

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  1. Is It Possible to Care for Ecosystems? Policy Paralysis and Ecosystem Management.Robert K. Garcia & Jonathan A. Newman - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):170-182.
    Conservationists have two types of arguments for why we should conserve ecosystems: instrumental and intrinsic value arguments. Instrumental arguments contend that we ought to conserve ecosystems because of the benefits that humans, or other morally relevant individuals, derive from ecosystems. Conservationists are often loath to rely too heavily on the instrumental argument because it could potentially force them to admit that some ecosystems are not at all useful to humans, or that if they are, they are not more useful than (...)
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    A Comparison of Two IPM Training Strategies in China: The Importance of Concepts of the Rice Ecosystem for Sustainable Insect Pest Management[REVIEW]James Mangan & Margaret S. Mangan - 1998 - Agriculture and Human Values 15 (3):209-221.
    Our study in China of two Integrated Pest Management (IPM) training programs for farmers shows that one is more effective than the other in reducing pesticide applications as well as in imparting to farmers an understanding of the rice ecosystem. The two training programs are based upon two different paradigms of IPM. This article uses a triangulated method of measuring concept attainment among farmer trainees in China as one measure of the effectiveness of training. Concepts of insect ecology (...)
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  3. Vedic Philosophy for Himalayan Eco-System Development.M. L. Dewan & B. D. Joshi (eds.) - 1993 - Concept Pub. Co..
     
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  4.  22
    Sustainability : A Philosophy of Adaptive Ecosystem Management.Bryan G. Norton - 2005 - University of Chicago Press.
    Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 0-226-595 19-6 (cloth : alk. paper) . A . 1. Environmental policy. 2. Environmental management — Decision making. 3. Interdisciplinary research. 4. Communication in science. 5. Sustainable ...
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  5.  13
    Climate Change and Ecosystem Management.Ronald L. Sandler - 2013 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (1):1-15.
    This article addresses the implications of rapid and uncertain ecological change, and global climate change in particular, for reserve oriented and restoration oriented ecosystem management. I argue for the following conclusions: (1) rapid and uncertain ecological change undermines traditional justifications for reserve oriented and restoration oriented ecosystem management strategies; (2) it requires rethinking ecosystem management goals, not just developing novel strategies (such as assisted colonization) to accomplish traditional goals; (3) species preservation ought to be (...)
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  6.  94
    Understanding Risk in Forest Ecosystem Services: Implications for Effective Risk Management, Communication and Planning.Kristina Blennow, Johannes Persson, Annika Wallin, Niklas Vareman & Erik Persson - 2014 - Forestry 87:219-228.
    Uncertainty, insufficient information or information of poor quality, limited cognitive capacity and time, along with value conflicts and ethical considerations, are all aspects thatmake risk managementand riskcommunication difficult. This paper provides a review of different risk concepts and describes how these influence risk management, communication and planning in relation to forest ecosystem services. Based on the review and results of empirical studies, we suggest that personal assessment of risk is decisive in the management of forest ecosystem (...)
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  7. Sustainability: A Philosophy of Adaptive Ecosystem Management.Bryan G. Norton - 2007 - Environmental Values 16 (2):272-277.
     
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  8.  10
    Sustainability: A Philosophy of Adaptive Ecosystem Management.Gary Varner - 2007 - Environmental Ethics 29 (3):307-312.
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  9.  39
    Bryan Norton: A Pragmatist's Take on Sustainable Development: Review of Sustainability: A Philosophy of Adaptive Ecosystem Management[REVIEW]Christopher H. Pearson - 2010 - Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (2):419-422.
  10.  24
    A Review of Bryan G. Norton's Sustainability: A Philosophy of Ecosystem Management[REVIEW]Marilyn Holly - 2007 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (4):335-352.
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  11.  2
    Uncertainty, Risk and Ecosystem Management.Fabian Schuppert - 2013 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (1):22-25.
  12. Sustainability: A Philosophy of Adaptive Ecosystem Management[REVIEW]Gary Varner - 2007 - Environmental Ethics 29 (3):307-312.
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  13. Ecosystem Health and Sustainable Resource Management.B. G. Norton - 1991 - In Robert Costanza (ed.), Ecological Economics: The Science and Management of Sustainability. Columbia University Press. pp. 23--41.
     
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  14. Ecosystem Health New Goals for Environmental Management.Robert Costanza, Bryan G. Norton & Benjamin D. Haskell - 1992
     
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  15. 38. Soil, Water and Crop Management for Sand/Ecosystem.B. P. Agrawal - 1992 - In B. C. Chattopadhyay (ed.), Science and Technology for Rural Development. S. Chand & Co.. pp. 286.
     
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  16.  34
    Linking Social and Ecological Systems: Management Practices and Social Mechanisms for Building Resilience.Fikret Berkes, Carl Folke & Johan Colding (eds.) - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    It is usually the case that scientists examine either ecological systems or social systems, yet the need for an interdisciplinary approach to the problems of environmental management and sustainable development is becoming increasingly obvious. Developed under the auspices of the Beijer Institute in Stockholm, this new book analyses social and ecological linkages in selected ecosystems using an international and interdisciplinary case study approach. The chapters provide detailed information on a variety of management practices for dealing with environmental change. (...)
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  17.  36
    Adaptive Management of Nonnative Species: Moving Beyond the “Either-or” Through Experimental Pluralism.M. Evans Jason, C. Wilkie Ann & Burkhardt Jeffrey - 2008 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (6):521-539.
    This paper develops the outlines of a pragmatic, adaptive management-based approach toward the control of invasive nonnative species (INS) through a case study of Kings Bay/Crystal River, a large artesian springs ecosystem that is one of Florida’s most important habitats for endangered West Indian manatees ( Trichechus manatus ). Building upon recent critiques of invasion biology, principles of adaptive management, and our own interview and participant–observer research, we argue that this case study represents an example in which (...)
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  18.  3
    Diversification of Land Management Goals and Strategies in Response to Climate Change.Evelyn Brister & Elizabeth N. Hane - 2013 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (1):26-28.
    A commentary on Ronald Sandler, 2013, "Climate change and Ecosystem Management." Rapid ecological change requires rethinking land management goals and strategies. We propose extending Sandler’s view. First, it is a false dichotomy to assume that a definitive choice must be made between reserve oriented and restoration approaches. Second, even more emphasis can be placed on the value of diversity in management approaches.
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  19.  24
    Beneath the Straw: In Defense of Participatory Adaptive Management[REVIEW]J. M. Evans, A. C. Wilkie & J. Burkhardt - 2009 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (2):169-180.
    Our recent paper advocating adaptive management of invasive nonnative species (INS) in Kings Bay, Florida received detailed responses from both Daniel Simberloff, a prominent invasion biologist, and Mark Sagoff, a prominent critic of invasion biology. Simberloff offers several significant lines of criticism that compel detailed rebuttals, and, as such, most of this reply is dedicated to this purpose. Ultimately, we find it quite significant that Simberloff, despite his other stated objections to our paper, apparently agrees with our argument that (...)
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    Environmental Subsidiarity as a Guiding Principle for Forestry Governance: Application to Payment for Ecosystem Services and REDD+ Architecture.Pablo Martinez de Anguita, Maria Ángeles Martín & Abbie Clare - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (4):617-631.
    This article describes and proposes the “environmental subsidiarity principle” as a guiding ethical value in forestry governance. Different trends in environmental management such as local participation, decentralization or global governance have emerged in the last two decades at the global, national and local level. This article suggests that the conscious or unconscious application of subsidiarity has been the ruling principle that has allocated the level at which tasks have been assigned to different agents. Based on this hypothesis this paper (...)
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  21. Implementing a Process for Integration Research: Ecosystem Services Project, Australia.Steven J. Cork & Wendy Proctor - 2005 - Journal of Research Practice 1 (2):Article M6.
    This paper reports on the design and implementation of a multi-phase interactive process among a set of scientists, policy makers, land managers, and community representatives, so as to facilitate communication, mutual understanding, and participative decision making. This was part of the Ecosystem Services Project in Australia. The project sought to broaden public understanding about the natural ecosystems in Australia. The study reported here pertains to one of the project sites--the Goulburn Broken catchment, a highly productive agricultural watershed in the (...)
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  22.  5
    Environmental Values and Adaptive Management.B. G. Norton & A. C. Steinemann - 2001 - Environmental Values 10 (4):473-506.
    The trend in environmental management toward more adaptive, community-based, and holistic approaches will require new approaches to environmental valuation. In this paper, we offer a new valuation approach, one that embodies the core principles of adaptive management, which is experimental, multi-scalar, and place-based. In addition, we use hierarchy theory to incorporate spatial and temporal variability of natural systems into a multi-scalar management model. Our approach results in the consideration of multiple values within community-based ecosystem management, (...)
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  23.  16
    Politics and Epistemology: Inclusion and Controversy in Adaptive Management Processes.Bryan G. Norton - 2007 - Environmental Ethics 29 (3):299-306.
    Kevin Elliott has argued that I defend two “conceptions” of adaptive management processes in my book, Sustainability: A Philosophy of Adaptive Ecosystem Management, calling the conceptions “political” and “metaphysical,” respectively. Elliott claims that I must choose between them. Elliott has not sufficiently explained how he proceeds from the claim that I provide two separable arguments for my adaptive management process to his conclusion that I have two conceptions of this process. Once this confusion is clarified, it (...)
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  24. Politics and Epistemology: Inclusion and Controversy in Adaptive Management Processes.Bryan G. Norton - 2007 - Environmental Ethics 29 (3):299-306.
    Kevin Elliott has argued that I defend two “conceptions” of adaptive management processes in my book, Sustainability: A Philosophy of Adaptive Ecosystem Management, calling the conceptions “political” and “metaphysical,” respectively. Elliott claims that I must choose between them. Elliott has not sufficiently explained how he proceeds from the claim that I provide two separable arguments for my adaptive management process to his conclusion that I have two conceptions of this process. Once this confusion is clarified, it (...)
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  25.  5
    Aboriginal Overkill.Charles E. Kay - 1994 - Human Nature 5 (4):359-398.
    Prior to European influence, predation by Native Americans was the major factor limiting the numbers and distribution of ungulates in the Intermountain West. This hypothesis is based on analyses of (1) the efficiency of Native American predation, including cooperative hunting, use of dogs, food storage, use of nonungulate foods, and hunting methods; (2) optimal-foraging studies; (3) tribal territory boundary zones as prey reservoirs; (4) species ratios, and sex and age of aboriginal ungulate kills; (5) impact of European diseases on aboriginal (...)
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  26. Mirae Sŏnjin Han'guk Ŭi Haengjŏng Yŏn'gu.Ho-jin Ch'oe (ed.) - 2008 - Pŏmmunsa.
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  27.  11
    Ecosystem Health: Some Preventive Medicine.Dale Jamieson - 1995 - Environmental Values 4 (4):333 - 344.
    Some ecologists, philosophers, and policy analysts believe that ecosystem health can be defined in a rigorous way and employed as a management goal in environmental policy. The idea of ecosystem health may have something to recommend it as part of a rhetorical strategy, but I am dubious about its utility as a technical term in environmental policy. I develop several objections to this latest version of scientism in environmental policy, and conclude that our environmental problems fundamentally involve (...)
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  28.  11
    Common Law, Common Property, and Common Enemy: Notes on the Political Geography of Water Resources Management for the Sundarbans Area of Bangladesh. [REVIEW]James L. Wescoat Jr - 1990 - Agriculture and Human Values 7 (2):73-87.
    Water has a dual role in the Sundarbans area of southwestern Bangladesh. Hydrologic processes are vital to the ecological functioning and cultural identity of the mangrove ecosystem. But at the same time, large scale water development creates external forces that threaten the Sundarbans environment. Water is managed to a limited degree as a common property resource, both in the Sundarbans and in larger regions. It is also managed as private property, a public good, a state-controlled resource, an open access (...)
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  29.  36
    Naturalness in Biodiversity Management.Helena Siipi - 2007 - The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 3:173-178.
    Decline of biodiversity—richness, variety and variability of living beings—is an issue of concern world wide. Nevertheless, not all biological diversity is valued by conservation biologists. Most of them reject an idea of creation of so called A-areas—i.e. maximally rich and diverse biotic areas which have been produced by methods like genetic engineering and species introduction. Reasons for this are considered. A-areas are artefacts: their existence has been intentionally brought about by intentionally modifying their properties in order to produce an entity (...)
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  30.  16
    Examining Ecosystem Integrity.Bruce Morito - 1999 - Environmental Ethics 21 (1):59-73.
    Attempts to come to grip with what appears to be the autonomy of nature have developed into several schools of thought. Among the most influential of these schools is the ecosystem integrity approach to environmental ethics, management and policy. The philosophical arm of the approach has been spearheaded by Laura Westra and her work in An Environmental Proposal for Ethics. The emphasis that this school places on pristine wilderness to model ecosystem integrity and the arguments Westra devises (...)
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  31.  13
    Social Learning in the Governance of Forest Ecosystem Services.Tom Dedeurwaerdere - 2012 - In Eric Brousseau, Tom Dedeurwaerdere & Bernd Siebenhüner (eds.), Reflexive Governance for Global Public Goods. MIT Press. pp. 205.
    This chapter examines the role of social learning in the governance of the forest ecosystem service through a case study that involves forest groups in Flanders, Belgium, where social learning has generated significant results within a short period. The case study specifically focuses on three social learning mechanisms extensively used in managing social-ecological systems. These mechanisms include a monitoring strategy based on sustainability criteria and indicators as a liberal learning device, experimenting with disruptive action strategies, and involving new stakeholders (...)
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  32.  9
    Evaluation of Insecticide Resistance Management Based Integrated Pest Management Programme.Rajinder Peshin, Rajinder Kalra, A. K. Dhawan & Tripat Kumar - 2007 - AI and Society 21 (3):357-381.
    Insecticide resistance management (IRM) programme was launched in 26 cotton-growing districts of India in 2002 to rationalize the use of pesticides. The IRM strategy is presented within a full Integrated Pest Management (IPM) context with the premise that unless full-fledged efforts to understand all aspects of resistance phenomenon are made, any attempt to implement IPM at field level would not bear results. Unlike earlier IPM programmes, this programme is directly implemented by the scientists of state agricultural universities; thus (...)
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  33.  14
    Responses to “An Ethical Analysis of the Barriers to Effective Pain Management” by Ben A. Rich (CQ Vol 9, No 1).Claire Brett - 2001 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (1):88-98.
    Ben Rich, J.D., Ph.D., presents a scholarly, passionate view of the ethics of the His manuscript is detailed, analytical, and compassionate. No reasonable sensitive person, especially a physician committed to caring for patients, can disagree with the proposal that human beings should have their physical, emotional, and spiritual pain tended to aggressively, meticulously, and compassionately. Similarly, the same individuals advocating for such pain management would agree that no one should go to jail unless he or she is guilty of (...)
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  34.  12
    Improved Fallows: A Case Study of an Adaptive Response in Amazonian Swidden Farming Systems. [REVIEW]Kristina Marquardt, Rebecka Milestad & Lennart Salomonsson - 2013 - Agriculture and Human Values 30 (3):417-428.
    Many smallholders in the Amazon employ swidden (slash-and-burn) farming systems in which forest or forest fallows are the primary source of natural soil enrichment. With decreasing opportunities to claim natural forests for agriculture and shrinking landholdings, rotational agriculture on smaller holdings allows insufficient time for fallow to regenerate naturally into secondary forest. This case study examines how Peruvian farmers use “improved fallows” as an adaptive response to a situation of decreasing soil fertility and how the farmers describe the rationale underlying (...)
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    National Park Management and Values.Susan Power Bratton - 1985 - Environmental Ethics 7 (2):117-133.
    Throughout the history ofthe U.S. national park system, park advocates and managers have changed both acquisition priorities and internal management policies. The park movement began with the establishment of large, spectacular natural areas, primarily in the West. As the movement developed there was more emphasis on the biological, on recreation, and on parks near population centers. GraduaIly, scenic wonders and uniqueness have become less necessary to designation and the types of sites eligible have diversified. Early managers treated the parks (...)
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  36.  40
    Ecosystem as Circuits: Diagrams and the Limits of Physical Analogies. [REVIEW]Peter J. Taylor & Ann S. Blum - 1991 - Biology and Philosophy 6 (2):275-294.
    Diagrams refer to the phenomena overtly represented, to analogous phenomena, and to previous pictures and their graphic conventions. The diagrams of ecologists Clarke, Hutchinson, and H.T. Odum reveal their search for physical analogies, building on the success of World War II science and the promise of cybernetics. H.T. Odum's energy circuit diagrams reveal also his aspirations for a universal and natural means of reducing complexity to guide the management of diverse ecological and social systems. Graphic conventions concerning framing and (...)
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  37.  37
    Naturalness in Biological Conservation.Helena Siipi - 2004 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (6):457-477.
    Conservation scientists are arguing whether naturalness provides a reasonable imperative for conservation. To clarify this debate and the interpretation of the term natural, I analyze three management strategies – ecosystem preservation, ecosystem restoration, and ecosystem engineering – with respect to the naturalness of their outcomes. This analysis consists in two parts. First, the ambiguous term natural is defined in a variety of ways, including (1) naturalness as that which is part of nature, (2) naturalness as a (...)
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  38.  9
    Continuing Issues in the Limitations of Pesticide Use in Developing Countries.Kishor Atreya, Bishal Sitaula, Fred Johnsen & Roshan Bajracharya - 2011 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (1):49-62.
    The rationale for pesticide use in agriculture is that costs associated with pesticide pollution are to be justified by its benefits, but this is not so obvious. Valuing the benefits by simple economic analysis has increased pesticide use in agriculture and consequently produced pesticide-induced “public ills.” This paper attempts to explore the research gaps of the economic and social consequences of pesticide use in developing countries, particularly with an example of Nepal. We argue that although the negative sides of agricultural (...)
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  39.  26
    Access and Control of Resources: Lessons From the Sanrem Crsp. [REVIEW]Cornelia Butler Flora - 2001 - Agriculture and Human Values 18 (1):41-48.
    Attention to differences within communities is important in working toward sustainability of an agro-ecosystem. In the Sustainable Agriculture and Natural Resource Management Collaborative Research Support Program, gender made a difference in terms of access and control over key resources – financial, human, natural, and social capital – critical for project success. Efforts to build social capital among women proved critical in developing both collective and households strategies for sustainability. The sites differed greatly in both landscape and lifescape. Women's (...)
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  40.  25
    Privacy in the Clouds.Ann Cavoukian - 2008 - Identity in the Information Society 1 (1):89-108.
    Informational self-determination refers to the right or ability of individuals to exercise personal control over the collection, use and disclosure of their personal data by others. The basis of modern privacy laws and practices around the world, informational privacy has become a challenging concept to protect and promote in a world of ubiquitous and unlimited data sharing and storage among organizations. The paper advocates a “user-centric” approach to managing personal data online. However, user-centricity can be problematic when the user—the data (...)
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  41.  19
    Biology and Philosophy in Yellowstone.Holmes Rolston - 1990 - Biology and Philosophy 5 (2):241-258.
    Yellowstone National Park poses critical issues in biology and philosophy. Among these are (1) how to value nature, especially at the ecosystem level, and whether to let nature take its course or employ hands-on scientific management; (2) the meaning of natural as this operates in park policy; (3) establishing biological claims on th scale of regional systems; (4) the interplay of natural and cultural history, involving both native and European Americans; (5) and sociopolitical forces as determinants in biological (...)
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  42. Measuring Knowledge Management Maturity at HEI to Enhance Performance-an Empirical Study at Al-Azhar University in Palestine.Samy S. Abu Naser, Mazen J. Al Shobaki & Youssef M. Abu Amuna - 2016 - International Journal of Commerce and Management Research 2 (5):55-62.
    This paper aims to assess knowledge management maturity at HEI to determine the most effecting variables on knowledge management that enhance the total performance of the organization. This study was applied on Al-Azhar University in Gaza strip, Palestine. This paper depends on Asian productivity organization model that used to assess KM maturity. Second dimension assess high performance was developed by the authors. The controlled sample was (364). Several statistical tools were used for data analysis and hypotheses testing, including (...)
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  43.  16
    Norton's Conception of Sustainability: Political, Not Metaphysical?Kevin Elliott - 2007 - Environmental Ethics 29 (1):3-22.
    In his new book, Sustainability: A Philosophy of Adaptive Ecosystem Management, Bryan G. Norton proposes an account of sustainability grounded in the deliberation of local communities as part of an adaptive management process. One can distinguish two different ways of justifying his account—resulting in “political” and “metaphysical” conceptions of sustainability—in much the same way that John Rawls famously distinguishes between political and metaphysical conceptions of justice. Whereas the metaphysical conception of sustainability depends on principles that are specific (...)
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  44.  7
    Norton's Conception of Sustainability.Kevin Elliott - 2007 - Environmental Ethics 29 (1):3-22.
    In his new book, Sustainability: A Philosophy of Adaptive Ecosystem Management, Bryan G. Norton proposes an account of sustainability grounded in the deliberation of local communities as part of an adaptive management process. One can distinguish two different ways of justifying his account—resulting in “political” and “metaphysical” conceptions of sustainability—in much the same way that John Rawls famously distinguishes between political and metaphysical conceptions of justice. Whereas the metaphysical conception of sustainability depends on principles that are specific (...)
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  45.  18
    Change of Plans?Patrik Baard - 2015 - Environmental Philosophy 12 (2):185-204.
    Sustainable ecosystem management often requires setting goals despite uncertainty regarding the achievability and desirability of the intended state of affairs. Coming to doubt the achievability or desirability of a previously set goal might sometimes, but not always, require reconsidering that goal. There is, however, a need to strike a balance between responsiveness to new information and knowing when to retain goals despite doubts. By critically engaging with adaptive ecosystem management, as advocated by environmental pragmatist Bryan G. (...)
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    Traversing the Commons to Climb the Mountain.Mark Heuer - 2009 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 20:160-170.
    This paper explores the theoretical underpinnings of collaboration and ecosystem management in order to identify the relationships and processes involved in implementing ecosystem management programs through cross-sector collaboration. Ecosystem management requires a highly adaptive and resilient social-ecological governance approach, which addresses spatiality and temporality issues. In order to explore possible implementation issues with ecosystem management, propositions are developed dealing with institutional isomorphism and collective action. The paper concludes with a discussion of the (...)
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  47.  7
    Politics and Epistemology.Bryan G. Norton - 2007 - Environmental Ethics 29 (3):299-306.
    Kevin Elliott has argued that I defend two “conceptions” of adaptive management processes in my book, Sustainability: A Philosophy of Adaptive Ecosystem Management, calling the conceptions “political” and “metaphysical,” respectively. Elliott claims that I must choose between them. Elliott has not sufficiently explained how he proceeds from the claim that I provide two separable arguments for my adaptive management process to his conclusion that I have two conceptions of this process. Once this confusion is clarified, it (...)
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  48. Norton’s Conception of Sustainability: Political, Not Metaphysical?Kevin Elliott - 2007 - Environmental Ethics 29 (1):3-22.
    In his new book, Sustainability: A Philosophy of Adaptive Ecosystem Management, Bryan G. Norton proposes an account of sustainability grounded in the deliberation of local communities as part of an adaptive management process. One can distinguish two different ways of justifying his account—resulting in “political” and “metaphysical” conceptions of sustainability—in much the same way that John Rawls famously distinguishes between political and metaphysical conceptions of justice. Whereas the metaphysical conception of sustainability depends on principles that are specific (...)
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  49. Knowledge Management Maturity in Universities and its Impact on Performance Excellence "Comparative Study".Samy S. Abu Naser, Mazen J. Al Shobaki & Youssef M. Abu Amuna - 2016 - Journal of Scientific and Engineering Research 3.
    The paper assesses Knowledge Management Maturity(KMM) in the universities to determine the impact of knowledge management on performance excellence. This study was applied on Al-Azhar University and Al-Quds Open University in Gaza strip, Palestine. This paper depends on Asian productivity organization model that used to assess KMM. Second dimension which assess performance excellence was developed by the authors. The controlled sample was (610). Several statistical tools were used for data analysis and hypotheses testing, including reliability Correlation using Cronbach’s (...)
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  50. Network Management of Predictive Mobile Networks.Stephen Bush, Frost F., S. Victor, Joseph Evans & B. - 1999 - Journal of Network and Systems Management 7 (2).
    There is a trend toward the use of predictive systems in communications networks. At the systems and network management level predictive capabilities are focused on anticipating network faults and performance degradation. Simultaneously, mobile communication networks are being developed with predictive location and tracking mechanisms. The interactions and synergies between these systems present a new set of problems. A new predictive network management framework is developed and examined. The interaction between a predictive mobile network and the proposed network (...) system is discussed. The Rapidly Deployable Radio Network is used as a specific example to illustrate these interactions. (shrink)
     
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