Results for 'Edith Gwendolyn Nally'

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  1.  30
    Is Plato a Coherentist? The Theory of Knowledge in Republic V–VII.Edith Gwendolyn Nally - 2015 - Apeiron 48 (2):149-175.
  2.  24
    P. Ryan Plato's Phaedrus. A Commentary for Greek Readers. Introduction by Mary Louise Gill. Pp. Xxx + 344, Map. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2012. Paper, US$29.95. ISBN: 978-0-8061-4259-3. [REVIEW]Edith Nally - 2013 - The Classical Review 63 (2):360-361.
  3.  21
    Jeanne d'Arc by Lucien Fabre.Mary Edith - 1951 - Franciscan Studies 11 (1):104-107.
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  4.  8
    Functional Connectivity in Post-Stroke Aphasia: Innovative Tools at the Service of Evidence-Based Practice.Durand Edith - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  5.  2
    Simplifying the Rules.Edward Nally - 2001 - Legal Ethics 4 (1):8-10.
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  6.  33
    On Being a ‘We’: Edith Stein’s Contribution to the Intentionalism Debate.Timothy Burns - 2015 - Human Studies 38 (4):529-547.
    It is commonplace to speak of social groups as if they were capable of the same sorts of activities as individuals. We say, “Germany won the World Cup”; “The United States invaded Iraq”; and “The world mourned the passing of Nelson Mandela”. In so doing, we attribute agency, belief, and emotional states to groups themselves. In recent years, much literature devoted to analyzing such statements and their implications has emerged. Within this literature, the issue of “intentionalism,” whether individuals must have (...)
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  7. Edith Stein: On the Problem of Empathy.Kris McDaniel - forthcoming - In Eric Schliesser (ed.), Ten Neglected Philosophical Classics. Oxford University Press.
    I will discuss Stein’s first major philosophical work, On the Problem of Empathy. I’ll first present some of the background context to the composition of this work and then discuss some of the themes of the work that I find intriguing.
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  8. The Curious Case of Collective Experience: Edith Stein’s Phenomenology of Communal Experience and a Spanish Fire-Walking Ritual.Burns Timothy - 2016 - The Humanistic Psychologist 44 (4):366-380.
    In everyday language, we readily attribute experiences to groups. For example, 1 might say, “Spain celebrated winning the European Cup” or “The uncovering of corruption caused the union to think long and hard about its internal structure.” In each case, the attribution makes sense. However, it is quite difficult to give a nonreductive account of precisely what these statements mean because in each case a mental state is ascribed to a group, and it is not obvious that groups can have (...)
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  9.  47
    Closeness and Distance in the Nurse-Patient Relation. The Relevance of Edith Stein's Concept of Empathy.Sylvia M. Maatta - 2006 - Nursing Philosophy 7 (1):3-10.
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  10.  26
    A Place for the Role of Community in the Structure of the State: Edith Stein and Edmund Husserl.Antonio Calcagno - 2016 - Continental Philosophy Review 49 (4):403-416.
    This essay argues that Stein’s view of the state can overcome Husserl’s skepticism about the state being an authentic, intense community rooted in solidarity while not negating his hope for the advent of a genuinely ethical, rational culture. Whereas Husserl places rationality and freedom within the framework of culture proper and not in the state, Stein sees the state as an extension of persons that can give the state its own free, deliberating and rational Ich kann.
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  11.  21
    Edith Stein’s Phenomenology of Sensual and Emotional Empathy.Fredrik Svenaeus - 2018 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 17 (4):741-760.
    This paper presents and explicates the theory of empathy found in Edith Stein’s early philosophy, notably in the book On the Problem of Empathy, published in 1917, but also by proceeding from complementary thoughts on bodily intentionality and intersubjectivity found in Philosophy of Psychology and the Humanities published in 1922. In these works Stein puts forward an innovative and detailed theory of empathy, which is developed in the framework of a philosophical anthropology involving questions of psychophysical causality, social ontology (...)
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  12.  53
    Edith Stein and the Contemporary Psychological Study of Empathy.Michael Larkin & Rita W. Meneses - 2012 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 43 (2):151-184.
    Illuminated by the writings of Edith Stein, this paper presents a model of empathy as a very particular intersubjective understanding. This is commonly a view absent from psychology literature. For Stein, empathy is the experience of experientially and directly knowing another person’s experience, as it unfolds in the present, together with the awareness of the ‘otherness’ of that experience. It can be conceptually distinguished, in terms of process and experience, from current models that propose that empathic understandings are ‘intellectual’ (...)
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  13.  14
    Edith Stein and the Problem of Empathy: Locating Ascription and a Structural Relation to Picture Consciousness.Peter Shum - 2012 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 43 (2):178-194.
    The domain of phenomenological investigation delineated by the Husserlian term authentic empathy presents us with an immediate tension. On the one hand, authentic empathy is supposed to grant the subject access (in some sense that remains to be fully specified) to the Other’s experience. On the other hand, foundational phenomenological considerations pertaining to the apprehension of a foreign subjectivity determine that it is precisely a disjunction in subjective processes that is constitutive of the Other being other. In my approach to (...)
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  14.  13
    Edith Stein’s Phenomenology of Sensual and Emotional Empathy.Fredrik Svenaeus - 2017 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-20.
    This paper presents and explicates the theory of empathy found in Edith Stein’s early philosophy, notably in the book On the Problem of Empathy, published in 1917, but also by proceeding from complementary thoughts on bodily intentionality and intersubjectivity found in Philosophy of Psychology and the Humanities published in 1922. In these works Stein puts forward an innovative and detailed theory of empathy, which is developed in the framework of a philosophical anthropology involving questions of psychophysical causality, social ontology (...)
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  15.  26
    Edith Stein: A Philosophical Prologue, 1913-1922.Alasdair MacIntyre - 2005 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Edith Stein lived an unconventional life. Born into a devout Jewish family, she drifted into atheism in her mid teens, took up the study of philosophy, studied with Edmund Husserl, the founder of phenomenology, became a pioneer in the women's movement in Germany, a military nurse in World War I, converted from atheism to Catholic Christianity, became a Carmelite nun, was murdered at Auschwitz-Birkenau in 1942, and canonized by Pope John Paul II.
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  16.  26
    Edith Stein’s Account of Communal Mind and its Limits: A Phenomenological Reading.Emanuele Caminada - 2015 - Human Studies 38 (4):549-566.
    Edith Stein claims that communal experiences are not reducible to the collection of individual experiences directed to the same object or upon the same content. Based on this intuition she gives a phenomenological description of the intentional structure that is proper to communal experiences regarding to their content, mode, and subject. While expanding on her attempts to reassess Husserl’s description of intentionality in an original social-ontological framework, I will stress her precious distinction between individual consciousness and communal stream of (...)
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  17.  41
    Edith Stein’s Social Ontology of the State, the Law and Social Acts: An Eidetic Approach.Francesca De Vecchi - 2015 - Studia Phaenomenologica 15:303-330.
    In her Investigation Concerning the State, Edith Stein takes up some of the main ideas of the social ontology presented by Adolf Reinach, and develops a social ontology of the state, of the law and of social acts. I argue that Stein’s social ontology is an eidetics of the state, the law and social acts. Stein identifies the essential relations that constitute the state, the law and social acts, i.e. pinpoints the parts upon which the state, the law and (...)
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  18.  3
    Phenomenological Distinctions Between Empathy De Vivo and Empathy in Fiction: From Contemporary Direct Perception Theory Back to Edith Stein’s Eidetics of Empathy.Francesca De Vecchi & Francesca Forlè - forthcoming - Topoi:1-10.
    This paper deals with phenomenological distinctions concerning empathy with real persons and empathy with fictional characters. We will introduce both contemporary accounts of our perception of others and Edith Stein’s account of empathy. These theories will turn out to be fruitful in defending our main thesis, i.e. that the differences between empathy with real people and empathy with fictional characters are not structural but just qualitative. We will argue that in both cases empathy is a direct act of perceiving (...)
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  19.  4
    La alegría como signo de la nupcialidad en tensión escatológica: Christophe Lebreton - Edith Stein.Cecilia Avenatti de Palumbo & Alejandro Bertolini - 2015 - Veritas 32 (32):37-56.
    Nuestra hipótesis consiste en considerar la alegría como fruto del dinamismo interpersonal entre Dios y el hombre bajo la figura de la nupcialidad, cuyas notas de reciprocidad, exclusividad, intimidad y fecundidad especifican esta dimensión particular de vida teologal. Al desplegarse en la historia, la nupcialidad adquiere una tensión escatológica pues el diálogo amante de libertades intensifica la presencia recíproca de Dios y el hombre hasta desembocar en una radicalidad que puede conducir al martirio. Tales fueron los casos de dos místicos (...)
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  20.  14
    Sympathy, Disability, and the Nurse: Female Power in Edith Wharton’s The Fruit of the Tree. [REVIEW]Rebecca Garden - 2010 - Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (3):223-242.
    The nursing profession’s emphasis on empathy as essential to nursing care may undermine nurses’ power as a collective and detract from perceptions of nurses’ analytical skills and expertise. The practice of empathy may also obscure and even compound patients’ suffering when it does not fully account for their subjectivity. This essay examines the relation of empathy to women’s agency and explores the role empathy plays in obscuring rather than empowering the suffering other, particularly people who are disabled, through a close (...)
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  21.  45
    What Is Life? The Contributions of Hedwig Conrad-Martius and Edith Stein.Angela Ales Bello & Antonio Calcagno - 2012 - Symposium 16 (2):20-33.
    The phenomenological movement originates with Edmund Husserl, and two of his young students and collaborators, Edith Stein and Hedwig Conrad-Martius, made a notable contribution to the very delineation of the phenomenological method, which pushed phenomenology in a “realistic” direction. This essay seeks to examine the decisive influence that these two thinkers had on two specific areas: the value of the sciences and certain metaphysical questions. Concerningthe former, I maintain that Stein, departing from a philosophical, phenomenological analysis of the human (...)
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  22.  16
    On the Vulnerability of a Community: Edith Stein and Gerda Walther.Antonio Calcagno - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (3):255-266.
    Edith Stein and Gerda Walther explain how community comes to be and how it is structured, but they do not develop significant accounts of how communities disintegrate or die, albeit they make passing allusions to how this may happen. I argue that what makes communities vulnerable to their possible demise, following both Stein’s and Walther’s social ontology, is the breakdown of the sense of the communal bond, that is, the failure of the community members’ ability to make sense of (...)
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  23.  7
    The experience of the human being in the world and its relevance to scientific work, according to Psychic Causality of Edith Stein.Anneliese Meis - 2018 - Veritas 40:161-190.
    Resumen El presente estudio investiga la importancia de la “experiencia originaria” husserliana para la comprensión del conflicto de las ciencias exactas con el problema de Dios, que Edith Stein califica de “angustia inconsciente de encontrarse” con Él. A través de su controversia con la Psicología del siglo XIX, la discípula de Husserl muestra en su obra Causalidad Psíquica que hace falta un adecuado conocimiento de la índole propia de la ciencia para remontar con rigor metódico a la originariedad de (...)
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  24.  63
    Edith Stein and Heidegger's «Being and Time»: A White Hermeneutics.Jose Luis Caballero Bono - 2012 - Veritas: Revista de Filosofía y Teología 27 (27):97-112.
    Edith Stein leyó la obra de Martin Heidegger Ser y tiempo en 1927, el mismo año de su publicación. Este artículo trata de reconstruir la «hermenéutica blanca» de esa lectura, es decir, las reacciones que pudo suscitar y que no fueron puestas por escrito en ese momento. Se toman como guía tres comentarios azarosos de la autora en relación tanto a Ser y tiempo como a la filosofía de Heidegger en general. Edith Stein read Martin Heidegger’s Being and (...)
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  25.  49
    Toward the Subjectivity of the Human Person: Edith Stein's Contribution to the Theory of Identity.PeterJ Schulz - 2008 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (1):161-176.
    Edith Stein’s work revolves around one central question, namely, the identity of the person. Discussions of this topic are already present in Stein’s dissertation. Iexamine her theory of identity, developed throughout her work and maturing in her magnum opus, Finite and Eternal Being, in three stages, each of which is historically relevant and original. First, Stein’s development of the question is examined phenomenologically, focusing on Stein’s early work. Second, I will show how Stein takes her early phenomenological positions concerning (...)
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  26.  52
    "Dar-forma" all'umano: dimensione antropologica, etica ed educativa della bildung in Edith Stein // "Shaping" the human: anthropological, ethical and educational bildung in Edith Stein.Calogero Caltagirone - 2013 - Conjectura: Filosofia E Educação 18 (3):15-23.
    Il presente lavoro intende cogliere l’originalità e la fecondità della prospettiva di Edith Stein sul fondamento antropologico ed etico dell’educativo. Mediante l’analisi del radicamento antropologico della dimensione formativa, che si fonda sulla la struttura antropologica della persona umana, si pone l’obiettivo di offrire i fondamenti antropologici ed etici alla relazione educativa, concentrandosi sul senso dell’educazione intesa come formazione ( Bildung ) integrale dell’uomo.
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  27.  43
    Edmund Husserl and Edith Stein: The Question of the Human Subject.Angela Ales Bello - 2008 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (1):143-159.
    The goal of this article is to analyze the way in which Edith Stein describes the human subject throughout her research, including her phenomenological phaseand the period of her Christian philosophy. In order to do this, I trace essential moments in Husserl’s philosophy, showing both Stein’s reliance upon Husserl andher originality. Both thinkers believe that an analysis of the human being can be carried out by examining consciousness and its lived experiences. Through suchan examination Stein arrives at the same (...)
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  28.  10
    The concept of empathy in Max Scheler and Edith Stein. Their religious and political scope.Enrique V. Muñoz Pérez - 2017 - Veritas 38:77-95.
    Resumen El objetivo de este artículo es mostrar que Edith Stein, en su tesis de doctorado, pone las bases de una interpretación filosófica religiosa y filosófico política de la “empatía”, tomando distancia de las investigaciones y críticas de Max Scheler a dicho concepto en el Sjmpathiebuch. En otras palabras, al entender Edith Stein la empatía como la experiencia del sujeto ajeno y de su vivencia y extenderla no sólo a la relación con los otros seres humanos, sino que (...)
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  29.  22
    Immanence, Self-Experience, and Transcendence in Edmund Husserl, Edith Stein, and Karl Jaspers.Dermot Moran - 2008 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (2):265-291.
    Phenomenology, understood as a philosophy of immanence, has had an ambiguous, uneasy relationship with transcendence, with the wholly other, with the numinous. If phenomenology restricts its evidence to givenness and to what has phenomenality, what becomes of that which is withheld or cannot in principle come to givenness? In this paper I examine attempts to acknowledge the transcendent in the writings of two phenomenologists, Edmund Husserl and Edith Stein, and also consider the influence of the existentialist Karl Jaspers, who (...)
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  30.  20
    Edith Stein’s Philosophy of Community in Her Early Work and in Her Later Finite and Eternal Being: Martin Heidegger’s Impact.Antonio Calcagno - 2011 - Philosophy and Theology 23 (2):231-255.
    Edith Stein’s early phenomenological texts describe community as a special unity that is fully lived through in consciousness. In her later works, unity is described in more theological terms as participation in the communal fullness and wholeness of God or Being. Can these two accounts of community or human belonging be reconciled? I argue that consciousness can bring to the fore the meaning of community, thereby conditioning our lived-experience of community, but it can also, through Heideggerian questioning, uncover that (...)
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  31.  42
    Edith Stein's Philosophy of Woman and of Women's Education.Mary Catharine Baseheart - 1989 - Hypatia 4 (1):120 - 131.
    Edith Stein, Husserl's brilliant student and assistant, devoted ten years of her life to teaching in a girls' secondary school, during which time she gave a series of lectures on educational reform and the appropriate education to be provided to girls. She grounds her answer to these questions in a philosophical account of the nature of woman. She argues that men and women share some universally human characteristics, but that they have separate and distinct natures. Her awareness of the (...)
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  32.  48
    The Study of the Soul Between Psychology and Phenomenology at Edith Stein.Angela Ales Bello - 2007 - Cultura 4 (2):90-108.
    In the study of the soul between psychology and phenomenology in Edith Stein works it becomes clearer that it is only phenomenology that really comes to gripswith the question of psychic causality by correlating the two moments and it is therefore only phenomenology that can respond to Hume’s objections while yetremaining on his selfsame terrain. It is very important to distinguish between psychology and phenomenology and also to clarify the relationship between psyche and consciousness; there is thus reproposed the (...)
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  33.  60
    Edith Stein's Proof for the Existence of God From Consciousness.Karl Schudt - 2008 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (1):105-125.
    I examine Edith Stein’s argument for the existence of God found in Finite and Eternal Being. Although largely Thomistic in its structure, the proof is unique in its details, starting with the life of the ego (Ichleben) and ascending to the being of God. The ego is shown to be contingent in its being as well as in the meaning-content through which it lives. Stein argues that this dependent being cannot be accounted for without a being that does not (...)
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  34.  41
    Fiction in Edith Stein's Idea of Empathy.Fernando Infante Del Rosal - 2013 - Ideas Y Valores 62 (153):137-155.
    RESUMEN En su primera investigación, Edith Stein se propuso definir la esencia de la Einfühlung (empatía) como experiencia de la conciencia ajena; pretendía así fundamentar que, como había indicado Husserl, ese acto abría la posibilidad de una intersubjetividad trascendental como solución al solipsismo de la conciencia. Stein halló la clave de esa esencia en la idea de originariedad, pero intentó evitar el problema de la empatía estética, sirviéndose de Los ídolos del autoconocimiento de Scheler. ABSTRACT In her first research (...)
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  35.  74
    Immanence, Self-Experience, and Transcendence in Edmund Husserl, Edith Stein, and Karl Jaspers.Dermot Moran - 2008 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (2):265-291.
    Phenomenology, understood as a philosophy of immanence, has had an ambiguous, uneasy relationship with transcendence, with the wholly other, with the numinous. If phenomenology restricts its evidence to givenness and to what has phenomenality, what becomes of that which is withheld or cannot in principle come to givenness? In this paper I examine attempts to acknowledge the transcendent in the writings of two phenomenologists, Edmund Husserl and Edith Stein (who attempted to fuse phenomenology with Neo-Thomism), and also consider the (...)
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  36.  43
    Edith Stein, Thomas Aquinas, and the Principle of Individuation. Reichmann - 2013 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (1):55-86.
    This paper focuses on the major work of Edith Stein, Finite and Eternal Being. It seeks to determine whether her mature philosophical synthesis is correctly viewed as Thomist. It strives to accomplish this by focusing mainly on her treatment of the problem of individuation.
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  37.  50
    Edmund Husserl and Edith Stein.Angela Ales Bello - 2008 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (1):143-159.
    The goal of this article is to analyze the way in which Edith Stein describes the human subject throughout her research, including her phenomenological phaseand the period of her Christian philosophy. In order to do this, I trace essential moments in Husserl’s philosophy, showing both Stein’s reliance upon Husserl andher originality. Both thinkers believe that an analysis of the human being can be carried out by examining consciousness and its lived experiences. Through suchan examination Stein arrives at the same (...)
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  38.  23
    The Study of the Soul Between Psychology and Phenomenology in Edith Stein.Angela Ales Bello - 2001 - Recherches Husserliennes 15 (2):31-52.
    In the study of the soul between psychology and phenomenology in Edith Stein works it becomes clearer that it is only phenomenology that really comes to gripswith the question of psychic causality by correlating the two moments and it is therefore only phenomenology that can respond to Hume’s objections while yetremaining on his selfsame terrain. It is very important to distinguish between psychology and phenomenology and also to clarify the relationship between psyche and consciousness; there is thus reproposed the (...)
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  39.  61
    Being, Aevum , and Nothingness: Edith Stein on Death and Dying. [REVIEW]Antonio Calcagno - 2008 - Continental Philosophy Review 41 (1):59-72.
    This article seeks to present for the first time a more systematic account of Edith Stein’s views on death and dying. First, I will argue that death does not necessarily lead us to an understanding of our earthly existence as aevum, that is, an experience of time between eternity and finite temporality. We always bear the mark of our finitude, including our finite temporality, even when we exist within the eternal mind of God. To claim otherwise, is to make (...)
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  40.  42
    Edith Stein's Understanding of Woman.Sarah Borden - 2006 - International Philosophical Quarterly 46 (2):171-190.
    This essay looks at Edith Stein’s descriptions of the fundamental equality, yet distinct differences between women and men, and attempts to make clear the ontology underlying her claims. Stein’s position—although drawing from the general Aristotelian-Thomistic position—differs from Thomas Aquinas’s, and she understands gender as tied significantly to our form or soul. The particular way in which gender is “written into” our soul, however, differs from the way in which both our humanity and individuality are tied to our soul. Thus, (...)
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  41.  42
    A Nothing That Is: Edith Stein on Being Without Essence.Walter Redmond - 2008 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (1):71-86.
    St. Thomas Aquinas has been considered a kairos in intellectual history for seeing God’s essence as being. Martin Heidegger criticized philosophers forrepresenting being as a be-ing and identifying it with God, and Jean-Luc Marion speaks of “God without being.” In her Potency and Act Edith Stein introduced thecategory of being without essence, but such being is not God but “the opposite.” For St. Augustine sin was an approach to nonbeing, and Stein saw it leading to a“displacement into nonbeing,” to (...)
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  42.  37
    Edith Stein's Philosophy of Community in Her Early Work and in Her Later Finite and Eternal Being.Antonio Calcagno - 2011 - Philosophy and Theology 23 (2):231-255.
    Edith Stein’s early phenomenological texts describe community as a special unity that is fully lived through in consciousness. In her later works, unity is described in more theological terms as participation in the communal fullness and wholeness of God or Being. Can these two accounts of community or human belonging be reconciled? I argue that consciousness can bring to the fore the meaning of community, thereby conditioning our lived-experience of community, but it can also, through Heideggerian questioning, uncover that (...)
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  43.  26
    Partv Edith Stein.Edith Stein - 2002 - In Dermot Moran & Timothy Mooney (eds.), The Phenomenology Reader. Routledge. pp. 227.
  44.  41
    Assistant and/or Collaborator? Edith Stein's Relationship to Edmund Husserl's Ideen II.Antonio Calcagno - 2006 - In Joyce Avrech Berkman (ed.), Contemplating Edith Stein: A Collection of Essays, pp. 243–270. University of Notre Dame Press.
  45.  35
    Edith Stein and Medieval Metaphysics.Victor M. Salas Jr - 2011 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 85 (2):323 - 340.
    This essay considers Edith Stein’s account of “essential being” and finds therein a point of continuity with medieval metaphysics. Scholarly attention has already been given to this feature of Stein’s metaphysics; it has been argued that “essential being,” while serving as a crucial point of distinction between Stein andThomas Aquinas’s own metaphysics, functions as a point of similarity between Stein and Duns Scotus. However, I argue that, while there are certainly manypoints of congruence between Stein and Scotus on the (...)
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  46.  17
    Biblical Images of God and the Reader's “I” as Imago Dei The Contribution of Edith Stein.Ann W. Astell - 2005 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 59 (4):382-391.
    Amidst Nazi persecution, Edith Stein discovered in the biblical images of God a mystical path of identity formation leading to a transformative union with Christ.
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  47.  26
    Edith Stein's Political Ontology.Timothy Martell - 2012 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 16 (2):201-217.
    What is a society? What is political power? John Searle claims that previous political philosophers not only neglected these fundamental questions but also lacked the means to effectively address them. Good answers, he thinks, depend on theories of speech acts, intentionality, and constitutive rules first developed by analytic philosophers. But Searle is mistaken. Early phenomenologists had already developed the requisite theories. Reinach’s philosophy of law includes a theory of speech acts. This theory is based on Husserl’s account of intentionality. (...) Stein extended that account by offering a detailed description of collective intentionality. And it was Stein who brought these strands of early phenomenological research together to address the very questions of political philosophy Searle regards as both fundamental and neglected. In this paper, I recount Stein’s answers to these questions and argue that they compare favourably withthose of Searle. (shrink)
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  48.  31
    Teresian Influence on the Work of Edith Stein.Jane Duran - 2011 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 32 (3):242 - 254.
    Edith Stein is honored today not only because of her sainthood but because of what is now seen as important and groundbreaking work in phenomenology done under especially arduous conditions. Thus it may be said with some accuracy that Stein is, among philosophers, in the comparatively rare category of being acknowledged both for her work and her exemplary life. Writing on Stein has standardly proceeded with an emphasis on the biographical factors that caused her to live and write as (...)
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  49.  17
    Why Thinking in Faith? A Reappraisal of Edith Stein's View of Reason.Tereza-Brindusa Palade - 2010 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 15 (2):401-412.
    This paper intends to question the conventional wisdom that philosophy should limit its endeavours to the horizon of modern transcendentalism, thus rejecting the presuppositions of faith. By reappraising Edith Stein’s views of faith and reason, which are also shared by the magisterial document of John Paul II, Fides et ratio, an argument for the possibility of “thinking in faith” is put forward. But why would it be important nowadays to engage in rational research in philosophy in a quest for (...)
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    Edith Stein's Little-Known Side.Hanna-Barbara Gerl-Falkovitz - 2009 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 83 (4):555-581.
    This paper examines Edith Stein’s phenomenological analysis of society—a neglected side of her thought—and situates it in a two-fold context: (a) philosophical studies of society undertaken in German-speaking lands in the aftermath of the First World War, and (b) Christian concepts of surrogacy and responsibility for the other.
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