145 found
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  1.  1
    Fourteen Important Concepts Regarding Moral Distress.Edmund G. Howe - 2017 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 28 (1):3-14.
    I suggest that we may want to strive, over time, to change our present professional-cultural view, from one that sees an expression of moral distress as a threat, to a professional-cultural view that welcomes these challenges. Such an effort to better medicine would not only include dissenting clinicians, but patients (and their loved ones) as well.
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  2.  4
    Beyond Shared Decision Making.Edmund G. Howe - 2020 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 31 (4):293-302.
    Shared decision making (SDM) is the state of the art for clinicians’ communication with patients and surrogate decision makers. SDM involves give and take, in which all parties interact to maximize the autonomy of patients. In this article I summarize the core steps of SDM and explore ways to use it to benefit patients to the greatest extent. I review three articles included in this issue of The Journal of Clinical Ethics that highlight additional approaches we can use to help (...)
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  3.  40
    Dilemmas in Military Medical Ethics Since 9/11.Edmund G. Howe - 2003 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (2):175-188.
  4.  9
    Ethics Consultants: Could They Do Better?Edmund G. Howe - 1999 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 10 (1):13-25.
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  5.  8
    Possible Mistakes.Edmund G. Howe - 1997 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 8 (4):323-328.
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  6.  1
    When Adolescents May Die.Edmund G. Howe - 2019 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 30 (2):77-88.
    In this article I will discuss how clinicians might best treat adolescents who may die. I initially discuss these patients’ cognition, emotional tendencies, and sensitivity to interpersonal cues. I next discuss their parents’ feelings of loss and guilt and their clinicians’ risk of imposing their own moral views without knowing this. I then address the practical concerns of helping these patients gain or regain resilience and to identify strengths they have had in the past. I finally explore who, among staff, (...)
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  7.  3
    Edge-of-the-Field Ethics Consulting: What Are We Missing?Edmund G. Howe - 2018 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 29 (2):81-92.
    Ethics consultants’ grasp of ethical principles is ever improving. Yet, what still remains and will remain lacking is their ability to access factors that lie outside their conscious awareness and thus still effect suboptimal outcomes. This article will explore several ways in which these poor outcomes may occur. This discussion will include clinicians’ implicit biases, well-intentioned but nonetheless intrusive violations of patients’ privacy, and clinicians’ unwittingly connoting to patients and families that clinicians regard their moral values and conclusions as superior. (...)
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  8.  8
    When Should Ethics Consultants Risk Giving their Personal Views?Edmund G. Howe - 2005 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 16 (3):183-192.
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  9.  5
    Lessons from “Jay Carter”.Edmund G. Howe - 2003 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 14 (1-2):109-117.
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  10.  4
    The Three Deadly Sins of Ethics Consultation.Edmund G. Howe - 1996 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 7 (2):99-108.
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  11.  1
    What Do We Owe Medical Students and Medical Colleagues Who Are Impaired?Edmund G. Howe - 2016 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 27 (2):87-98.
    Physicians who are impaired, engage in unprofessional behavior, or violate laws may be barred from further practice. Likewise, medical students may be dismissed from medical school for many infractions, large and small. The welfare of patients and the general public must be our first priority, but when we assess physicians and students who have erred, we should seek to respond as caringly and fairly as possible. This piece will explore how we may do this at all stages of the proceedings (...)
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  12.  2
    How to Retain the Trust of Patients and Families Even When We Will Not Provide the Treatment They Want.Edmund G. Howe - 2015 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 26 (2):89-99.
    How might clinicians best try to retain the trust of patients and family members after clinicians oppose giving a treatment? If clinicians can maintain the trust of patients and families in these situations, this may soften what may be the greatest possible loss—the death of a loved one.I discuss what clinicians seeking to retain trust should not do—namely impose their values and reason wrongly—and introduce strategies that clinicians may use to reduce both. I present five principles that clinicians can follow (...)
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  13.  7
    Throwing Jello: A Primer on Helping Patients.Edmund G. Howe - 2006 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 17 (1):2-14.
  14.  14
    Medical Determination (and Preservation) of Decision-Making Capacity.Edmund G. Howe, Daniel S. Gordon & Manuel Valentin - 1991 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 19 (1-2):27-33.
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  15.  8
    On Expanding the Parameters of Assisted Suicide, Directive Counseling, and Overriding Patients’ Cultural Beliefs.Edmund G. Howe - 1993 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 4 (2):107-111.
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  16.  17
    Treating the Troops.Edmund G. Howe & Edward D. Martin - 1991 - Hastings Center Report 21 (2):21-24.
    As we go to press, the threat of biological or chemical warfare in the Persian Gulf is no longer imminent. Yet the questions raised by the proposed use of “investigational drugs,” without informed consent, to protect U.S. troops remain. The article by Edmund G. Howe and Edward D. Martin presents the arguments that informed the Pentagon's thinking on the subject. It and the commentaries, by George J. Annas and Michael A. Grodin, and Robert J. Levine, explore, among others, issues of (...)
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  17.  9
    When a Mother Wants to Deliver with a Midwife at Home.Edmund G. Howe - 2013 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 24 (3):172-183.
    In this special issue of The Journal of Clinical Ethics, different views on both the ethical desirability of women delivering in hospitals or at home with midwives are discussed. What careproviders, including midwives, should recommend to mothers in regard to the place of giving birth is considered. Emotional concerns likely to be of importance to mothers, fathers, midwives, and doctors are also presented. Finally, possible optimal approaches at the levels of both policy and the bedside are suggested.
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  18.  27
    By Author BAGHERI, Alireza. Criticism of “Brain.Tom L. Beauchamp, Howard Brody, Franklin G. Miller, Alexander S. Curtis, Martina Darragh, Patricia Milmoe, Ronald M. U. S. Green, Sharona Hoffman, Edmund G. Howe & Jeffrey P. Kahn - 2003 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (4):407-09.
  19.  7
    Approaches (and Possible Contraindications) to Enhancing Patients’ Autonomy.Edmund G. Howe - 1994 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 5 (3):179-188.
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  20.  11
    All careproviders need more opportunities to share their ethical concerns with others.Edmund G. Howe - 2010 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 21 (3):179-188.
    Attention to the ethical concerns of healthcare aides can provide important information about patients’ needs to careproviders, improve the ethical environment of an institution, and benefit aides who suffer from bearing ethical concerns alone. All persons benefit from sharing their ethical concerns with others. Among other benefits, ethics consultation offers careproviders, caregivers, healthcare aides, patients, and patients’ loved ones an opportunity to have their concerns heard.John Fletcher tried to follow every ethics consultation with a debriefing for all participants, including patients (...)
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  21.  16
    A different approach to patients and loved ones who request "futile" treatments.Edmund G. Howe - 2012 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 23 (4):291-298.
    The author describes an alternative approach that careproviders may want to consider when caring for patients who request interventions that careproviders see as futile. This approach is based, in part, on findings of recent neuroimaging research. The author also provides several examples of seemingly justifiable “paternalistic omissions,” taken from articles in this issue of The Journal of Clinical Ethics (JCE). The author suggests that while careproviders should always give patients and their loved ones all potentially relevant information regarding “futile” decisions, (...)
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  22.  14
    An Ethical Priority Greater than Life Itself.Edmund G. Howe - 2012 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 23 (3):195-206.
    This article discusses a case in this issue of The Journal of Clinical Ethics by McCrary and colleagues, “Elective Delivery Before 39 Weeks’ Gestation Reconciling Maternal, Fetal, and Family Circumstances,” in which parents asked the medical team to deliver their fetus “early.” The author discusses (1) the importance that parents have to a child when they are able to love the child, and how important it is for decision makers to consider this; (2) exceptional approaches that may enable parents to (...)
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  23.  13
    A possible application of care-based ethics to people with disabilities during a pandemic.Edmund G. Howe - 2010 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 21 (4):275-283.
    Should people with exceptionally profound disabilities be given an equal chance of surviving a pandemic, even when their care might require a greater use of limited medical resources? How might an ethics of care be used to shape a policy regarding these patients?
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  24.  3
    Attributing Preferences and Violating Neutrality.Edmund G. Howe - 1992 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 3 (3):171-175.
  25.  5
    Allowing Patients to Find Meaning Where They Can.Edmund G. Howe - 2002 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 13 (3):179-187.
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  26.  5
    Influencing a Patient’s Religious Beliefs: Mandate or No-Man’s Land?Edmund G. Howe - 1995 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 6 (3):194-201.
  27.  9
    Biological Drivenness: A Relative Indication For Paternalism.Edmund G. Howe - 1997 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 8 (3):307-312.
  28.  3
    Beyond Determining Decision-Making Capacity.Edmund G. Howe - 2020 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 31 (1):3-16.
    One of the most important and difficult tasks in medicine is to determine when patients have the capacity to make decisions for themselves. This determination may determine a patient’s life or death. This article presents criteria and approaches now used to make this assessment and discusses how these approaches are presently applied in five common disorders that can serve as paradigms for approaches in other disorders. I propose that since there are new diagnoses and treatments, reconsidering our current practices is (...)
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  29.  7
    Beyond Respect for Autonomy.Edmund G. Howe - 2006 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 17 (3):195-206.
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  30.  3
    Beyond the Basics: More Ways that Ethics Consultants Can Help Patients.Edmund G. Howe - 2022 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 33 (1):3-12.
    The primary task of ethics consultants is to work with patients—and sometimes also their families—to discern and then meet patients’ and families’ needs and wants to the extent possible. That is primarily a cognitive endeavor. Yet the feelings of patients and ethics consultants may determine what they can work together to accomplish. This article considers their feelings. It looks at sources of distrust and their hopedfor resolution, specific means to enhance patients’ decision making in their relationship with ethics consultants, and (...)
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  31.  6
    Beyond the State of the Art in Ethics Consultation.Edmund G. Howe - 2009 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 20 (3):203-211.
  32.  25
    Child Abuse: How Society and Careproviders Should Respond.Edmund G. Howe - 2008 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 19 (4):307-315.
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  33. Can Careproviders Still Bond with Patients after They Are Turned Down for a Treatment They Need?Edmund G. Howe - 2021 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 32 (3):185-194.
    After COVID-19 first began to spread in the United States, dentists developed new guidelines that limited whom they could treat under these emergency conditions. Patients who faced greater limits to accessing treatment included children. Using a case of a child who was not able to access treatment, I discuss how careproviders might best seek to maintain their emotional bonding with patients and their loved ones, even if they must turn them down for an intervention.I also address whether and when to (...)
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  34. Clinical Dilemmas When Patients Want Assistance in Dying.Edmund G. Howe - 1994 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 5 (1):3-9.
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  35.  4
    Criteria for Deceit.Edmund G. Howe - 2004 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 15 (2):100-110.
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  36.  3
    "Caring for patients with dementia: an indication for" emotional communism".Edmund G. Howe - 1998 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 9 (1):3-11.
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  37.  2
    Caring for Transgender Adolescents.Edmund G. Howe - 2021 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 32 (4):277-286.
    This introductory article presents some subtle and, perhaps, controversial aspects of providing care to adolescents who identify as transgender. I will describe (1) how praise from careproviders can benefit parents who have difficulty accepting the gender identity of their child that was not assigned at birth; (2) how adolescents who identify as transgender may follow the internet advice of peers on how to “con” careproviders; (3) how it may be difficult for careproviders to decide whether to further patients’ felt needs (...)
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  38.  3
    Comment: Limiting Toxic Information.Edmund G. Howe - 2001 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 12 (2):143-149.
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  39. Commentary: “Missing” Patients by Seeing Only Their Cultures.Edmund G. Howe - 1998 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 9 (2):191-193.
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  40.  4
    ""Commentary on" a pedophilic physician": should careproviders deceive some patients to benefit others?Edmund G. Howe - 1999 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 10 (2):151-155.
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  41.  2
    Comment on the CEJA Guidelines: Treating Patients Who Deny Reality.Edmund G. Howe - 2006 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 17 (4):317-322.
  42.  13
    Challenging Patients’ Personal, Cultural, and Religious Beliefs.Edmund G. Howe - 2002 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 13 (4):259-273.
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  43.  3
    Caveats Regarding Slippery Slopes and Physicians’ Moral Conscience.Edmund G. Howe - 1992 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 3 (4):251-255.
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  44.  1
    Disability.Edmund G. Howe - 2004 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 15 (4):239-255.
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  45.  4
    Death-Defying Empathy.Edmund G. Howe - 2003 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 14 (4):233-245.
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  46.  2
    Deconstructing Equity, Autonomy, and Ethical Analysis.Edmund G. Howe - 1998 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 9 (2):98-107.
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  47.  4
    Doing Ethics Consultations Better.Edmund G. Howe - 2000 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 11 (3):195-205.
  48.  4
    Deciding Whether to Intervene.Edmund G. Howe - 1994 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 5 (2):129-131.
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  49.  5
    Deceiving Patients for Their Own Good.Edmund G. Howe - 1997 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 8 (3):211-216.
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  50.  2
    "Degloved patients, torture victims, and" bi-phasic ethics".Edmund G. Howe - 2002 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 13 (2):99-114.
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