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  1.  21
    Online Newspapers: A Substitute or Complement for Print Newspapers and Other Information Channels?Edmund Lauf, Klaus Schönbach & Ester De Waal - 2005 - Communications 30 (1):55-72.
    Research suggests that online newspapers are not as good as their printed counterparts in widening the range of topics their audience is aware of. But should we be concerned about that? So far, visiting online newspapers does not seem to be a substitute for reading traditional newspapers. But the evidence is scarce; only a few studies specifically look at the impact of online newspapers. In this study we look at to what extent online newspapers ‘take over’ from printed newspapers and (...)
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  2.  8
    Online and Print Newspapers in Europe in 2003. Evolving Towards Complementarity.Ramón Salaverría, Steve Paulussen, Susan L. Holmberg, Leopoldina Fortunati, Auksė Balčytienė, Edmund Lauf & Richard van der Wurff - 2008 - Communications 33 (4):403-430.
    This article assesses online newspapers in Europe from a media evolutionary perspective, ten years after the introduction of the World Wide Web. Comparing print and online front pages of 51 newspapers in 14 countries in 2003, we argue that online newspapers complement print newspapers in modest ways. Online, publishers put more emphasis on service information, offer additional news items, that nonetheless report on similar topics in similar ways, and add personal interactivity, content selectivity and real-time news to the print news (...)
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  3.  7
    Content or Design? Factors Influencing the Circulation of American and German Newspapers.Edmund Lauf & Klaus Schoenbach - 2002 - Communications 27 (1):1-14.
    What is it that helps newspapers gain or at least keep readers; is it the specific content they offer or measures of design? In an explorative secondary analysis, local daily newspapers in Germany are compared to daily newspapers in the US. The newspapers used in this study were analyzed twice, both in the 1980s and the mid-1990s. In the US, visualizing information and displaying it more generously were more important for positive developments in circulation than in Germany. In Germany, community (...)
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  4. Are National Communication Journals Still Necessary? A Case Study and Some Suggestions.Edmund Lauf & Klaus Schönbach - 2006 - Communications 31 (4):447-454.
    The number of journals in the field of communication is increasing. Above all, new, and more specialized journals geared to an international market, and therefore published in English, have appeared. In contrast to those journals, most national journals are still published in languages not accessible to the majority of communication scholars. How could national journals position themselves to survive? Our case study of 48 years of the leading German communication journal ‘Publizistik’ provides first insights into possible USPs of national communication (...)
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