22 found
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  1.  55
    Timmermann, Forschler, and The Attempt to Bridge the Kantian‐Consequentialist Gap.Edmund Wall - 2016 - Metaphilosophy 47 (4-5):696-699.
    Scott Forschler defends R. M. Hare's rationalist-universalizing-utilitarian moral approach against Jens Timmermann's critique of it. He argues that Timmermann fails to see that Kant's ethical rationalism might be consistent with utilitarianism, and argues that Timmermann merely assumes that Kant's deontology follows logically from his ethical rationalism. In Forschler's estimation, it has not been established that either Kant's or Hare's ethical rationalism is inconsistent with utilitarianism. This article, however, argues that, in his response to Timmermann on behalf of Hare's rationalist-universalizing-utilitarian approach, (...)
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  2. Sexual Harassment and Wrongful Communication.Edmund Wall - 2001 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 31 (4):525-537.
  3.  30
    The Problem of Group Agency.Edmund Wall - 2000 - Philosophical Forum 31 (2):187–197.
  4.  4
    Herman and the Prospect of Contextualizing Kantian Ethics.Edmund Wall - 2019 - Philosophical Forum 50 (3):333-353.
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  5.  32
    Voluntary Action.Edmund Wall - 2001 - Philosophia 28 (1-4):127-136.
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  6.  82
    Privacy and the Moral Right to Personal Autonomy.Edmund Wall - 2011 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (1):69-85.
    I argue that the moral right to privacy is the moral right to consent to access by others to one’s personal information. Although this thesis is relatively simple and already implicit in considerations about privacy, it has, nevertheless, been overlooked by philosophers. In the paper, I present and defend my account of the moral right to privacy, respond to possible objections to it, and attempt to show its advantages over two recent accounts: one by Steve Matthews and the other by (...)
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  7.  45
    The Definition of Sexual Harassment.Edmund Wall - 1991 - Public Affairs Quarterly 5 (4):371-385.
  8.  32
    Problems with the Group Rights Thesis.Edmund Wall - 2003 - American Philosophical Quarterly 40 (4):269 - 285.
  9.  17
    Hooker’s Consequentialism and the Depth of Moral Experience.Edmund Wall - 2009 - Dialogue 48 (2):337.
    ABSTRACT: In Ideal Code, Real World, Brad Hooker seeks to offer a version of ideal rule consequentialism that is immune from standard criticisms. I will attempt to challenge Hooker’s ideal rule-consequentialist theory by arguing that there are philosophical problems at the ultimate foundation of his maximizing consequentialist and pluralist approach toward well-being and other basic goods. I find that no amount of revision is likely to insulate his approach from standard criticisms. I suggest that any maximizing rule-consequentialist approach toward well-being, (...)
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  10.  35
    Reply to Iddo Landau.Edmund Wall - 2003 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 33 (2):235-241.
  11. The Real Direction of Dancy’s Moral Particularism.Edmund Wall - 2011 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (4):587-612.
    Jonathan Dancy, who defends a version of moral particularism, is committed to the view that any feature or reason for action might, in logical terms, have a positive moral valence in one context, a negative moral valence in a different context, and no moral valence at all in yet another context. In my paper, I attempt to demonstrate that, despite the denial by Dancy that proposed grounding properties with invariant moral valences may play a foundational role in morality, his own (...)
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  12.  52
    Toward a Unified Foundation of Natural Law Ethics.Edmund Wall - 2010 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 84 (4):747-779.
    I locate possible fertile common ground among the “new natural law theory” of Finnis, Grisez, and Boyle, the “traditional” Thomism of McInerny, and natural law derivationism. I respond to Murphy’s contention that the “inclinationism” of Finnis cannot be successfully asserted along with what Murphy takes to be a basic requirement of natural law ethics, namely that basic practical principles are to be “strongly grounded” in human nature. I argue that the tension between the inclinationism of Finnis and Murphy’s basic requirement (...)
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  13. Problems with Searle’s Derivation?Edmund Wall - 2011 - Philosophia 39 (3):571-580.
    In his paper, How to Derive ‘Ought’ From ‘Is,’ John R. Searle made a valiant attempt to derive an ought-statement from purely descriptive statements. In a recent issue of Philosophia, Scott Hill has offered criticisms of that proposed derivation. I argue that Hill has not established any errors in Searle's proposed derivation.
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  14.  17
    Intention and Coercion.Edmund Wall - 1988 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 5 (1):75-85.
    In this study I defend an account of 'dispositional coercion' and coercive offers which hinges primarily on the intentions of both the coercer and the victim. In doing so I argue against various baseline accounts of coercion. ;Baseline accounts center on the victim's estimation of a proposal's effect, the determination of coercive threats and offers primarily hinging on the victim's beliefs and preferences. I believe that it is the intended action of the individual making the proposal that provides the core (...)
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  15.  1
    Educational Theory: Philosophical and Political Perspectives.Edmund Wall (ed.) - 2001 - Prometheus Books.
  16. Foundation for a Natural Morality: A Deductive Approach for Defending and Developing a Moral Theory.Edmund Wall - 2018 - Lexington Books.
    This book examines the foundations of morality and criticizes various philosophical justifications that have been offered for basic moral principles or values throughout the years. This book introduces and defends what is designed to be a sure justification for a natural morality and its basic moral principles.
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  17.  36
    The Interpersonal Aspects of Coercive Threats and Offers.Edmund Wall - 2002 - Dialogue 41 (4):681-.
    Je défends ici une conception interpersonnelle des menaces et des offres coercitives, centrée sur les intentions de ceux qui font de telles menaces ou de tellesoffres. Je critique, ce faisant, un groupe de conceptions fort influentes, appelées «baseline accounts». Robert Nozick, qui adopte une approche de ce genre, incorpore à son analyse des menaces coercitives des éléments non moraux aussi bien que des éléments moraux. Les approches de Daniel Lyons et de David Zimmerman peuvent être vues, à certains égards, comme (...)
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  18.  33
    Natural Morality, Descriptivism, and Non-Cognitivism.Edmund Wall - 2015 - Philosophia 43 (1):233-248.
    I attempt to identify a problem running through the foundation of R. M. Hare’s ethical prescriptivism and the more recent sentimentalism/ethical expressivism of Simon Blackburn. The non-cognitivism to which Hare and Blackburn’s approaches are committed renders them unable to establish stable contents for basic moral principles and, thus, incapable of conducting a logical analysis of moral terms or statements. I argue that objective-descriptive- natural ethical theories are in a much better position to provide a satisfying account of the logical analysis (...)
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  19.  59
    Searle’s Derivation, Natural Law, and Moral Relativism.Edmund Wall - 2008 - Philosophia 36 (2):237-249.
    Some philosophers have maintained that even if John R. Searle’s attempted derivation of an evaluative proposition from purely descriptive premises is successful, moral ought would not have been derived. Searle agrees. I will argue that if Searle has successfully derived “ought,” then, based on various approaches taken towards the content of “morality,” this is moral ought. I will also trace out some of the benefits of a successful derivation of moral ought in relation to natural law ethics. I sketch a (...)
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  20.  21
    Natural Law and Basic Goods: An Irresolvable Debate?Edmund Wall - 2008 - Philo 11 (1):50-77.
    There would appear to be enormous philosophical differences between some influential exponents in contemporary natural law ethics. It would appear that there are deep and irresolvable philosophical differences between Ralph McInerny, on the one side, and Germain Grisez, Joseph Boyle, and John Finnis, on the other, with regard to both the contents of the basic goods of natural law, and as to whether there is an objective hierarchy among the basic goods themselves. The second of these apparently unbridgeable philosophical differences (...)
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  21.  6
    The Interpersonal Aspects of Coercive Threats and Offers.Edmund Wall - 2002 - Dialogue 41 (4):681-702.
    Je défends ici une conception interpersonnelle des menaces et des offres coercitives, centrée sur les intentions de ceux qui font de telles menaces ou de tellesoffres. Je critique, ce faisant, un groupe de conceptions fort influentes, appelées «baseline accounts». Robert Nozick, qui adopte une approche de ce genre, incorpore à son analyse des menaces coercitives des éléments non moraux aussi bien que des éléments moraux. Les approches de Daniel Lyons et de David Zimmerman peuvent être vues, à certains égards, comme (...)
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  22.  31
    Marx, Law, and Coercion.Edmund Wall - 2001 - Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (1):70–77.