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  1.  27
    Edward F. Becker (1975). Justice, Utility, and Interpersonal Comparisons. Theory and Decision 6 (4):471-484.
  2.  18
    Edward F. Becker (1971). Indeterminacy Defended. Philosophical Studies 22 (1-2):1 - 9.
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  3.  18
    Edward Becker (1975). Pure Reference: Linsky's Criticisms of Quine. Philosophia 5 (4):477-488.
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  4.  23
    Edward Becker (2014). The Themes of Quine's Philosophy: Meaning, Reference, and Knowledge. Cambridge University Press.
    Willard Van Orman Quine's work revolutionized the fields of epistemology, semantics and ontology. At the heart of his philosophy are several interconnected doctrines: his rejection of conventionalism and of the linguistic doctrine of logical and mathematical truth, his rejection of the analytic/synthetic distinction, his thesis of the indeterminacy of translation and his thesis of the inscrutability of reference. In this book Edward Becker sets out to interpret and explain these doctrines. He offers detailed analyses of the relevant texts, discusses Quine's (...)
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  5. Edward F. Becker (1976). W. V. Quine, "The Roots of Reference". [REVIEW] Theory and Decision 7 (3):235.
     
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  6. Marci A. Hamilton & Edward R. Becker (2005). God Vs. The Gavel: Religion and the Rule of Law. Cambridge University Press.
    God vs. the Gavel challenges the pervasive assumption that all religious conduct deserves constitutional protection. While religious conduct provides many benefits to society, it is not always benign. The thesis of the book is that anyone who harms another person should be governed by the laws that govern everyone else - and truth be told, religion is capable of great harm. This may not sound like a radical proposition, but it has been under assault since the 1960s. The majority of (...)
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  7. Marci A. Hamilton & Edward R. Becker (2009). God Vs. The Gavel: Religion and the Rule of Law. Cambridge University Press.
    God vs. the Gavel challenges the pervasive assumption that all religious conduct deserves constitutional protection. While religious conduct provides many benefits to society, it is not always benign. The thesis of the book is that anyone who harms another person should be governed by the laws that govern everyone else - and truth be told, religion is capable of great harm. This may not sound like a radical proposition, but it has been under assault since the 1960s. The majority of (...)
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