41 found
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  1.  33
    Linguistic complexity: locality of syntactic dependencies.Edward Gibson - 1998 - Cognition 68 (1):1-76.
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  2. Number as a cognitive technology: Evidence from Pirahã language and cognition.Michael C. Frank, Daniel L. Everett, Evelina Fedorenko & Edward Gibson - 2008 - Cognition 108 (3):819-824.
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  3.  54
    The communicative function of ambiguity in language.Steven T. Piantadosi, Harry Tily & Edward Gibson - 2012 - Cognition 122 (3):280-291.
  4.  20
    Lossy‐Context Surprisal: An Information‐Theoretic Model of Memory Effects in Sentence Processing.Richard Futrell, Edward Gibson & Roger P. Levy - 2020 - Cognitive Science 44 (3):e12814.
    A key component of research on human sentence processing is to characterize the processing difficulty associated with the comprehension of words in context. Models that explain and predict this difficulty can be broadly divided into two kinds, expectation‐based and memory‐based. In this work, we present a new model of incremental sentence processing difficulty that unifies and extends key features of both kinds of models. Our model, lossy‐context surprisal, holds that the processing difficulty at a word in context is proportional to (...)
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  5.  23
    Consequences of the Serial Nature of Linguistic Input for Sentenial Complexity.Daniel Grodner & Edward Gibson - 2005 - Cognitive Science 29 (2):261-290.
    All other things being equal the parser favors attaching an ambiguous modifier to the most recent possible site. A plausible explanation is that locality preferences such as this arise in the service of minimizing memory costs—more distant sentential material is more difficult to reactivate than more recent material. Note that processing any sentence requires linking each new lexical item with material in the current parse. This often involves the construction of long‐distance dependencies. Under a resource‐limited view of language processing, lengthy (...)
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  6.  63
    Info/information theory: Speakers choose shorter words in predictive contexts.Kyle Mahowald, Evelina Fedorenko, Steven T. Piantadosi & Edward Gibson - 2013 - Cognition 126 (2):313-318.
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  7.  23
    The influence of referential processing on sentence complexity.Tessa Warren & Edward Gibson - 2002 - Cognition 85 (1):79-112.
  8.  34
    Wordform Similarity Increases With Semantic Similarity: An Analysis of 100 Languages.Isabelle Dautriche, Kyle Mahowald, Edward Gibson & Steven T. Piantadosi - 2017 - Cognitive Science:2149-2169.
    Although the mapping between form and meaning is often regarded as arbitrary, there are in fact well-known constraints on words which are the result of functional pressures associated with language use and its acquisition. In particular, languages have been shown to encode meaning distinctions in their sound properties, which may be important for language learning. Here, we investigate the relationship between semantic distance and phonological distance in the large-scale structure of the lexicon. We show evidence in 100 languages from a (...)
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  9.  16
    Words cluster phonetically beyond phonotactic regularities.Isabelle Dautriche, Kyle Mahowald, Edward Gibson, Anne Christophe & Steven T. Piantadosi - 2017 - Cognition 163 (C):128-145.
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  10.  10
    Extraction from subjects: Differences in acceptability depend on the discourse function of the construction.Anne Abeillé, Barbara Hemforth, Elodie Winckel & Edward Gibson - 2020 - Cognition 204 (C):104293.
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  11.  9
    The cultural origins of symbolic number.David M. O'Shaughnessy, Edward Gibson & Steven T. Piantadosi - 2022 - Psychological Review 129 (6):1442-1456.
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  12.  42
    Accommodating Presuppositions Is Inappropriate in Implausible Contexts.Raj Singh, Evelina Fedorenko, Kyle Mahowald & Edward Gibson - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (3):607-634.
    According to one view of linguistic information, a speaker can convey contextually new information in one of two ways: by asserting the content as new information; or by presupposing the content as given information which would then have to be accommodated. This distinction predicts that it is conversationally more appropriate to assert implausible information rather than presuppose it. A second view rejects the assumption that presuppositions are accommodated; instead, presuppositions are assimilated into asserted content and both are correspondingly open to (...)
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  13.  34
    Word Forms Are Structured for Efficient Use.Kyle Mahowald, Isabelle Dautriche, Edward Gibson & Steven T. Piantadosi - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (8):3116-3134.
    Zipf famously stated that, if natural language lexicons are structured for efficient communication, the words that are used the most frequently should require the least effort. This observation explains the famous finding that the most frequent words in a language tend to be short. A related prediction is that, even within words of the same length, the most frequent word forms should be the ones that are easiest to produce and understand. Using orthographics as a proxy for phonetics, we test (...)
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  14.  17
    Comprehenders model the nature of noise in the environment.Rachel Ryskin, Richard Futrell, Swathi Kiran & Edward Gibson - 2018 - Cognition 181 (C):141-150.
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  15.  11
    Communication efficiency of color naming across languages provides a new framework for the evolution of color terms.Bevil R. Conway, Sivalogeswaran Ratnasingam, Julian Jara-Ettinger, Richard Futrell & Edward Gibson - 2020 - Cognition 195 (C):104086.
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  16.  36
    Processing relative clauses in Chinese.Franny Hsiao & Edward Gibson - 2003 - Cognition 90 (1):3-27.
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  17.  27
    Recency preference in the human sentence processing mechanism.Edward Gibson, Neal Pearlmutter, Enriqueta Canseco-Gonzalez & Gregory Hickok - 1996 - Cognition 59 (1):23-59.
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  18.  18
    Grammatical cues to subjecthood are redundant in a majority of simple clauses across languages.Kyle Mahowald, Evgeniia Diachek, Edward Gibson, Evelina Fedorenko & Richard Futrell - 2023 - Cognition 241 (C):105543.
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  19.  24
    How do you know that? Automatic belief inferences in passing conversation.Paula Rubio-Fernández, Francis Mollica, Michelle Oraa Ali & Edward Gibson - 2019 - Cognition 193 (C):104011.
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  20.  14
    Reading relative clauses in English.Edward Gibson, Timothy Desmet, Daniel Grodner, Duane Watson & Kara Ko - 2005 - Cognitive Linguistics 16 (2):313-353.
    Two self-paced reading experiments investigated several factors that influence the comprehension complexity of singly-embedded relative clauses (RCs) in English. Three factors were manipulated in Experiment 1, resulting in three main effects. First, object-extracted RCs were read more slowly than subject-extracted RCs, replicating previous work. Second, RCs that were embedded within the sentential complement of a noun were read more slowly than comparable RCs that were not embedded in this way. Third, and most interestingly, object-modifying RCs were read more slowly than (...)
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  21.  4
    Infants' ability to connect gaze and emotional expression to intentional action.Trey Hedden, Jun Zhang, Annt Phillips, Henry M. Wellman, Elizabeth S. Spelke, Tessa Warren & Edward Gibson - 2002 - Cognition 85 (1):53-78.
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  22.  30
    The processing of extraposed structures in English.Roger Levy, Evelina Fedorenko, Mara Breen & Edward Gibson - 2012 - Cognition 122 (1):12-36.
  23.  57
    Poor writing, not specialized concepts, drives processing difficulty in legal language.Eric Martínez, Francis Mollica & Edward Gibson - 2022 - Cognition 224 (C):105070.
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  24.  12
    The effect of context on noisy-channel sentence comprehension.Sihan Chen, Sarah Nathaniel, Rachel Ryskin & Edward Gibson - 2023 - Cognition 238 (C):105503.
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  25.  11
    A verb-frame frequency account of constraints on long-distance dependencies in English.Yingtong Liu, Rachel Ryskin, Richard Futrell & Edward Gibson - 2022 - Cognition 222 (C):104902.
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  26.  37
    An On‐Line Study of Japanese Nesting Complexity.Kentaro Nakatani & Edward Gibson - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (1):94-112.
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  27.  9
    A noisy-channel approach to depth-charge illusions.Yuhan Zhang, Rachel Ryskin & Edward Gibson - 2023 - Cognition 232 (C):105346.
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  28.  17
    The influence of contextual contrast on syntactic processing: evidence for strong-interaction in sentence comprehension.Daniel Grodner, Edward Gibson & Duane Watson - 2005 - Cognition 95 (3):275-296.
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  29.  51
    Direct Evidence of Memory Retrieval as a Source of Difficulty in Non-Local Dependencies in Language.Evelina Fedorenko, Rebecca Woodbury & Edward Gibson - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (2):378-394.
    Linguistic dependencies between non‐adjacent words have been shown to cause comprehension difficulty, compared with local dependencies. According to one class of sentence comprehension accounts, non‐local dependencies are difficult because they require the retrieval of the first dependent from memory when the second dependent is encountered. According to these memory‐based accounts, making the first dependent accessible at the time when the second dependent is encountered should help alleviate the difficulty associated with the processing of non‐local dependencies. In a dual‐task paradigm, participants (...)
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  30. Processing Relative Clauses in Supportive Contexts.Evelina Fedorenko, Steve Piantadosi & Edward Gibson - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (3):471-497.
    Results from two self-paced reading experiments in English are reported in which subject- and object-extracted relative clauses (SRCs and ORCs, respectively) were presented in contexts that support both types of relative clauses (RCs). Object-extracted versions were read more slowly than subject-extracted versions across both experiments. These results are not consistent with a decay-based working memory account of dependency formation where the amount of decay is a function of the number of new discourse referents that intervene between the dependents (Gibson, 1998; (...)
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  31.  15
    Cross-linguistic gestures reflect typological universals: A subject-initial, verb-final bias in speakers of diverse languages.Richard Futrell, Tina Hickey, Aldrin Lee, Eunice Lim, Elena Luchkina & Edward Gibson - 2015 - Cognition 136 (C):215-221.
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  32.  27
    The Processing and Acquisition of Reference.Edward Gibson & Neal J. Pearlmutter (eds.) - 2011 - MIT Press.
    How people refer to objects in the world, how people comprehend reference, and how children acquire an understanding of and an ability to use reference.
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  33. Constraints on sentence processing.Edward Gibson & Neal J. Pearlmutter - 1998 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (7):262-268.
  34.  21
    Interpretative and post-interpretative processes in sentence comprehension.Edward Gibson & Rose Roberts - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (1):100-101.
    We discuss several issues raised by Caplan & Waters's distinction between interpretative and post-interpretative processes in sentence comprehension, including the nature and properties of the two systems, problems with measuring their respective capacities, and the relationship between the hypothesized separate-language-interpretation-resource (SLIR) and the general verbal working memory system that supports post-interpretive processing.
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  35.  12
    Structural priming is most useful when the conclusions are statistically robust.Kyle Mahowald, Ariel James, Richard Futrell & Edward Gibson - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  36.  22
    9. How recursive is language? A Bayesian exploration.Amy Perfors, Joshua B. Tenenbaum, Edward Gibson & Terry Regier - 2010 - In Harry van der Hulst (ed.), Recursion and Human Language. De Gruyter Mouton. pp. 159-176.
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  37.  60
    Quantitative Standards for Absolute Linguistic Universals.Steven T. Piantadosi & Edward Gibson - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (4):736-756.
    Absolute linguistic universals are often justified by cross-linguistic analysis: If all observed languages exhibit a property, the property is taken to be a likely universal, perhaps specified in the cognitive or linguistic systems of language learners and users. In many cases, these patterns are then taken to motivate linguistic theory. Here, we show that cross-linguistic analysis will very rarely be able to statistically justify absolute, inviolable patterns in language. We formalize two statistical methods—frequentist and Bayesian—and show that in both it (...)
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  38. Parsing: overview.Florian Wolf & Edward Gibson - 2003 - In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
     
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  39.  8
    Word Order Predicts Cross‐Linguistic Differences in the Production of Redundant Color and Number Modifiers.Sarah A. Wu & Edward Gibson - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (1):e12934.
    When asked to identify objects having unique shapes and colors among other objects, English speakers often produce redundant color modifiers (“the red circle”) while Spanish speakers produce them less often (“el circulo (rojo)”). This cross‐linguistic difference has been attributed to a difference in word order between the two languages, under the incremental efficiency hypothesis (Rubio‐Fernández, Mollica, & Jara‐Ettinger, 2020). However, previous studies leave open the possibility that broad language differences between English and Spanish may explain this cross‐linguistic difference such that (...)
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  40.  2
    Rational Sentence Interpretation in Mandarin Chinese.Meilin Zhan, Sihan Chen, Roger Levy, Jiayi Lu & Edward Gibson - 2023 - Cognitive Science 47 (12):e13383.
    Previous work has shown that English native speakers interpret sentences as predicted by a noisy‐channel model: They integrate both the real‐world plausibility of the meaning—the prior—and the likelihood that the intended sentence may be corrupted into the perceived sentence. In this study, we test the noisy‐channel model in Mandarin Chinese, a language taxonomically different from English. We present native Mandarin speakers sentences in a written modality (Experiment 1) and an auditory modality (Experiment 2) in three pairs of syntactic alternations. The (...)
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  41.  7
    Scalar Implicature is Sensitive to Contextual Alternatives.Zheng Zhang, Leon Bergen, Alexander Paunov, Rachel Ryskin & Edward Gibson - 2023 - Cognitive Science 47 (2):e13238.
    The quantifier “some” often elicits a scalar implicature during comprehension: “Some of today's letters have checks inside” is often interpreted to mean that not all of today's letters have checks inside. In previous work, Goodman and Stuhlmüller (G&S) proposed a model that predicts that this implicature should depend on the speaker's knowledgeability: If the speaker has only examined some of the available letters (e.g., two of three letters), people are less likely to infer that “some” implies “not all” than if (...)
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