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Edward Vogel
Loyola University, Chicago
  1.  89
    Visual Working Memory Capacity: From Psychophysics and Neurobiology to Individual Differences.Steven J. Luck & Edward K. Vogel - 2013 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (8):391-400.
  2. Event-Related Potential Studies of Attention.Steven J. Luck, Geoffrey F. Woodman & Edward K. Vogel - 2000 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (11):432-440.
  3.  44
    Swapping or Dropping? Electrophysiological Measures of Difficulty During Multiple Object Tracking.Trafton Drew, Todd S. Horowitz & Edward K. Vogel - 2013 - Cognition 126 (2):213-223.
  4.  8
    Visual Working Memory Continues to Develop Through Adolescence.Elif Isbell, Keisuke Fukuda, Helen J. Neville & Edward K. Vogel - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  5.  14
    Lower Region: A New Cue for Figure-Ground Assignment.Shaun P. Vecera, Edward K. Vogel & Geoffrey F. Woodman - 2002 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 131 (2):194-205.
  6. The Visual Arrays Task: Visual Storage Capacity or Attention Control?Jessie D. Martin, Jason S. Tsukahara, Christopher Draheim, Zach Shipstead, Cody A. Mashburn, Edward K. Vogel & Randall W. Engle - 2021 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 150 (12):2525-2551.
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  7.  32
    Attention is Not Unitary.Geoffrey F. Woodman, Edward K. Vogel & Steven J. Luck - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):153-154.
    A primary proposal of the Cowan target article is that capacity limits arise in working memory because only 4 chunks of information can be attended at one time. This implies a single, unitary attentional focus or resource; we instead propose that relatively independent attentional mech- anisms operate within different cognitive subsystems depending on the demands of the current stimuli and tasks.
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