7 found
Order:
  1. A Path to the Oasis: Sharī‘Ah and Reason in Islamic Moral Epistemology.Edward Omar Moad - 2007 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (3):135 - 148.
    I propose a framework for comparative Islamic—Western ethics in which the Islamic categories "Islam, Iman," and "Ihsan" are juxtaposed with the concepts of obligation, value, and virtue, respectively. I argue that "shari'a" refers to both the obligation component and the entire structure of the Islamic ethic; suggesting a suspension of the understanding of "shari'a" as simply Islamic "law," and an alternative understanding of "usul al-fiqh" as a moral epistemology of obligation. I will test this approach by addressing the question of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  97
    A Significant Difference Between Al-Ghazālī and Hume on Causation.Edward Omar Moad - 2008 - Journal of Islamic Philosophy 3:22-39.
  3.  11
    A Significant Difference Between Al-Ghazālī and Hume on Causation.Edward Omar Moad - 2008 - Journal of Islamic Philosophy 3:22-39.
  4.  14
    A Path to the Oasis: Sharī‘Ah and Reason in Islamic Moral Epistemology.Edward Omar Moad - 2007 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (3):135-148.
    I propose a framework for comparative Islamic—Western ethics in which the Islamic categories "Islam, Iman," and "Ihsan" are juxtaposed with the concepts of obligation, value, and virtue, respectively. I argue that "shari'a" refers to both the obligation component and the entire structure of the Islamic ethic; suggesting a suspension of the understanding of "shari'a" as simply Islamic "law," and an alternative understanding of "usul al-fiqh" as a moral epistemology of obligation. I will test this approach by addressing the question of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5. Al-Ghazali on Power, Causation, and 'Acquisition'.Edward Omar Moad - 2007 - Philosophy East and West 57 (1):1-13.
    : Al-Ghazali on Power, Causation, and 'Acquisition' Edward Omar Moad In Al-Iqtişādfial-I'tiqād (Moderation in belief ), at the end of his chapter on divine power, Abu Hamid al-Ghazali writes, "No created thing comes about through another [created thing]. Rather, all come about through [divine] power." A precise understanding of what al-Ghazali means by this statement requires an understanding of his conception of power. Here, we will articulate this conception of power and show how it renders a distinctive occasionalist thesis that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  61
    Al-Ghazali’s Reflections on the Metaphysics of Metaphor in the Mishkāt Al-Anwar.Edward Omar Moad - 2007 - Sophia 46 (2):163-175.
    Mythological language is sometimes understood as a way of representing, by concrete imagery, more abstract notions. In this paper, we will pose some metaphysical questions about the possibility of such a representation. These questions will serve to motivate a brief tour of Mishkāt al-Anwār (Niche of Lights)—Abu Hamid al-Ghazali’s commentary on the famous ayat al-nur (“verse of light”) of the Qur’an—wherein is discussed, among other things, how symbolic imagery is possible, and “the respect in which the spirits of the meanings (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Prolegomena to an Occasionalist Metaphysics.Edward Omar Moad - 2004 - Dissertation, University of Missouri - Columbia
    It is a fundamental doctrine of the Abrahamic religions, following from the belief in God as the creator, that He is the primary cause of all natural phenomena. Some, however, have gone further, to claim that God is the only cause. Consequently, there are no genuine created, or secondary, causes. The western tradition has coined the term 'occasionalism' for this doctrine, according to which all apparent instances of secondary causation are just that---instances of merely apparent, or occasional, causation. The idea (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark