14 found
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  1. Cognition in the Wild.Edwin Hutchins - 1995 - MIT Press.
    Hutchins examines a set of phenomena that have fallen between the established disciplines of psychology and anthropology, bringing to light a new set of relationships between culture and cognition.
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  2. Cognition in the Wild.Edwin Hutchins - 1998 - Mind 107 (426):486-492.
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  3. Distributed Cognition, Toward a New Foundation for Human-Computer Interaction Research.David Kirsh, Jim Hollan & Edwin Hutchins - 2000 - ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction 7 (2):174-196.
    We are quickly passing through the historical moment when people work in front of a single computer, dominated by a small CRT and focused on tasks involving only local information. Networked computers are becoming ubiquitous and are playing increasingly significant roles in our lives and in the basic infrastructure of science, business, and social interaction. For human-computer interaction o advance in the new millennium we need to better understand the emerging dynamic of interaction in which the focus task is no (...)
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  4. The cultural ecosystem of human cognition.Edwin Hutchins - 2014 - Philosophical Psychology 27 (1):1-16.
    Everybody knows that humans are cultural animals. Although this fact is universally acknowledged, many opportunities to exploit it are overlooked. In this article, I propose shifting our attention from local examples of extended mind to the cultural-cognitive ecosystems within which human cognition is embedded. I conclude by offering a set of conjectures about the features of cultural-cognitive ecosystems.
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  5. Cognitive Ecology.Edwin Hutchins - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (4):705-715.
    Cognitive ecology is the study of cognitive phenomena in context. In particular, it points to the web of mutual dependence among the elements of a cognitive ecosystem. At least three fields were taking a deeply ecological approach to cognition 30 years ago: Gibson’s ecological psychology, Bateson’s ecology of mind, and Soviet cultural-historical activity theory. The ideas developed in those projects have now found a place in modern views of embodied, situated, distributed cognition. As cognitive theory continues to shift from units (...)
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    How a cockpit remembers its speeds.Edwin Hutchins - 1995 - Cognitive Science 19 (3):265--288.
    Cognitive science normally takes the individual agent as its unit of analysis. In many human endeavors, however, the outcomes of interest are not determined entirely by the information processing properties of individuals. Nor can they be inferred from the properties of the individual agents, alone, no matter how detailed the knowledge of the properties of those individuals may be. In commercial aviation, for example, the successful completion of a flight is produced by a system that typically includes two or more (...)
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    Beyond Single‐Mindedness: A Figure‐Ground Reversal for the Cognitive Sciences.Mark Dingemanse, Andreas Liesenfeld, Marlou Rasenberg, Saul Albert, Felix K. Ameka, Abeba Birhane, Dimitris Bolis, Justine Cassell, Rebecca Clift, Elena Cuffari, Hanne De Jaegher, Catarina Dutilh Novaes, N. J. Enfield, Riccardo Fusaroli, Eleni Gregoromichelaki, Edwin Hutchins, Ivana Konvalinka, Damian Milton, Joanna Rączaszek-Leonardi, Vasudevi Reddy, Federico Rossano, David Schlangen, Johanna Seibtbb, Elizabeth Stokoe, Lucy Suchman, Cordula Vesper, Thalia Wheatley & Martina Wiltschko - 2023 - Cognitive Science 47 (1):e13230.
    A fundamental fact about human minds is that they are never truly alone: all minds are steeped in situated interaction. That social interaction matters is recognized by any experimentalist who seeks to exclude its influence by studying individuals in isolation. On this view, interaction complicates cognition. Here, we explore the more radical stance that interaction co-constitutes cognition: that we benefit from looking beyond single minds toward cognition as a process involving interacting minds. All around the cognitive sciences, there are approaches (...)
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  8. Anthropology in Cognitive Science.Andrea Bender, Edwin Hutchins & Douglas Medin - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):374-385.
    This paper reviews the uneven history of the relationship between Anthropology and Cognitive Science over the past 30 years, from its promising beginnings, followed by a period of disaffection, on up to the current context, which may lay the groundwork for reconsidering what Anthropology and (the rest of) Cognitive Science have to offer each other. We think that this history has important lessons to teach and has implications for contemporary efforts to restore Anthropology to its proper place within Cognitive Science. (...)
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    Culture and Inference: A Trobriand Case Study.Edwin Hutchins - 1980 - Harvard University Press.
    Explains the changing of seasons and describes how plants and animals adapt to and prepare for these changes.
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  10.  44
    I See What You Are Saying: Action as Cognition in fMRI Brain Mapping Practice.Morana Alač & Edwin Hutchins - 2004 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 4 (3-4):629-661.
    In cognitive neuroscience, functional magnetic resonance imaging is used to produce images of brain functions. These images play a central role in the practice of neuroscience. In this paper we are interested in how these brain images become understandable and meaningful for scientists. In order to explore this problem we observe how scientists use such semiotic resources as gesture, language, and material structure present in the socially and culturally constituted environment. A micro-analysis of video records of scientists interacting with each (...)
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  11. Modeling the Emergence of Language as an Embodied Collective Cognitive Activity.Edwin Hutchins & Christine M. Johnson - 2009 - Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (3):523-546.
    Two decades of attempts to model the emergence of language as a collective cognitive activity have demonstrated a number of principles that might have been part of the historical process that led to language. Several models have demonstrated the emergence of structure in a symbolic medium, but none has demonstrated the emergence of the capacity for symbolic representation. The current shift in cognitive science toward theoretical frameworks based on embodiment is already furnishing computational models with additional mechanisms relevant to the (...)
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    Auto-organization and emergence of shared language structure.Edwin Hutchins & Brian Hazlehurst - 2002 - In A. Cangelosi & D. Parisi (eds.), Simulating the Evolution of Language. Springer Verlag. pp. 279--305.
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  13. Enculturating the Supersized Mind. [REVIEW]Edwin Hutchins - 2011 - Philosophical Studies 152 (3):437 - 446.
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  14.  33
    Hands as molecules: Representational gestures used for developing theory in a scientific laboratory.L. Amaya Becvar, James Hollan & Edwin Hutchins - 2005 - Semiotica 2005 (156):89-112.
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