Results for 'Eighteenth century'

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  1.  37
    Eighteenth Century British Aesthetics.James Shelley - 2018 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    18th-century British aesthetics addressed itself to a variety of questions: What is taste? What is beauty? Is there is a standard of taste and of beauty? What is the relation between the beauty of nature and that of artistic representation? What is the relation between one fine art and another? How ought the fine arts be ranked one against another? What is the nature of the sublime and ought it be ranked with the beautiful? What is the nature of (...)
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  2.  8
    Eighteenth-Century Attempts to Resolve the Vis Viva Controversy.Thomas Hankins - 1965 - Isis 56:281-297.
  3.  8
    Eighteenth-Century Attempts to Resolve the Vis Viva Controversy.Thomas L. Hankins - 1965 - Isis 56 (3):281-297.
  4.  31
    Eighteenth-Century French Materialism Clockwise and Anticlockwise.Timo Kaitaro - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (5):1022-1034.
    ABSTRACTBecause of their reliance on mechanistic metaphors and analogies referring to machines, the eighteenth-century materialists La Mettrie and Diderot have sometimes been described as ‘mechanistic materialists’. However, if one pays close attention to the ways in which mechanical analogies and metaphors were used in eighteenth-century French materialism, one sees that the recourse to these metaphors and comparisons in no way implies mechanism in the sense of physicalist reductionism. Instead, early instances of these comparisons appear in arguments (...)
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  5.  9
    French Eighteenth-Century Materialists and Natural Law.Ann Thomson - 2016 - History of European Ideas 42 (2).
    SummaryThis article looks at the discussions of natural law by the eighteenth-century French materialists Julien Offray de La Mettre, Denis Diderot, Paul Thiry d'Holbach and Claude-Adrien Helvétius. It is particularly concerned with their discussion of moral values and their attempt to find a materialistic basis for them as part of their rejection of religion. The discussion brings out the différences between them and analyses their dialogues on this question, including the other materialists' rejection of La Mettrie's amoralism, which (...)
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  6.  25
    The Eighteenth-Century Origins of the Concept of Scientific Revolution.I. Bernard Cohen - 1976 - Journal of the History of Ideas 37 (2):257.
  7. Eighteenth-Century British Logic and Rhetoric.Wilbur Samuel Howell - 1971 - Princeton: Princeton University Press.
     
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  8. What is Enlightenment?: Eighteenth-Century Answers and Twentieth-Century Questions.James Schmidt (ed.) - 1996 - University of California Press.
    This collection contains the first English translations of a group of important eighteenth-century German essays that address the question, "What is Enlightenment?" The book also includes newly translated and newly written interpretive essays by leading historians and philosophers, which examine the origins of eighteenth-century debate on Enlightenment and explore its significance for the present. In recent years, critics from across the political and philosophical spectrum have condemned the Enlightenment for its complicity with any number of present-day (...)
     
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  9.  85
    Performing the Categories: Eighteenth-Century Generation Theory and the Biological Roots of Kant's A Priori.Phillip R. Sloan - 2002 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (2):229-253.
    Phillip R. Sloan - Performing the Categories: Eighteenth-Century Generation Theory and the Biological Roots of Kant's A Priori - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40:2 Journal of the History of Philosophy 40.2 229-253 Preforming the Categories: Eighteenth-Century Generation Theory and the Biological Roots of Kant's A Priori Phillip R. Sloan Situating Kant's philosophical project in relation to the natural sciences of his day has been of concern to several scholars from both the history of science (...)
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  10.  8
    Theoretical Virtues in Eighteenth-Century Debates on Animal Cognition.Hein van den Berg - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (3):1-35.
    Within eighteenth-century debates on animal cognition we can distinguish at least three main theoretical positions: (i) Buffon’s mechanism, (ii) Reimarus’ theory of instincts, and (iii) the sensationalism of Condillac and Leroy. In this paper, I adopt a philosophical perspective on this debate and argue that in order to fully understand the justification Buffon, Reimarus, Condillac, and Leroy gave for their respective theories, we must pay special attention to the theoretical virtues these naturalists alluded to while justifying their position. (...)
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  11.  29
    Eighteenth-Century Anticipations of the Sociology of Conflict: The Case of Adam Ferguson.Lisa Hill - 2001 - Journal of the History of Ideas 62 (2):281-299.
  12.  14
    The Eighteenth Century Background.George H. Sabine & Basil Willey - 1942 - Philosophical Review 51 (3):335.
  13.  14
    Eighteenth-Century Uses of Vitalism in Constructing the Human Sciences.Peter Hanns Reill - 2010 - In Denis Alexander & Ronald L. Numbers (eds.), Biology and Ideology From Descartes to Dawkins. University of Chicago Press.
    In the period of the high and late Enlightenment, the human sciences were reformed based on ideas, methods, and assumptions drawn from the life sciences. The goal was to improve the human sciences by naturalizing them, injecting them with the spirit that animated the search for the principles of life in biology. Many Enlightenment thinkers took interest in the agenda set by a loose group of natural philosophers known as vitalists, which included Georges-Louis Leclerc de Buffon, Paul Barthez, Charles Bonnet, (...)
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  14. The Eighteenth-Century Background: Studies on the Idea of Nature in the Thought of the Period.Basil Willey - 1940 - Harmondsworth, Penguin.
  15.  21
    The Eighteenth Century Background.Basil Willey - 1941 - London: Chatto & Windus.
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  16.  25
    Eighteenth Century Intimations of Modernity.Michael J. Shapiro - 1993 - Political Theory 21 (2):273-293.
  17. The Cambridge History of Eighteenth-Century Philosophy.Knud Haakonssen (ed.) - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    More than thirty eminent scholars from nine different countries have contributed to The Cambridge History of Eighteenth-Century Philosophy - the most comprehensive and up-to-date history of the subject available in English. For the eighteenth century the dominant concept in philosophy was human nature and so it is around this concept that the work is centered. This allows the contributors to offer both detailed explorations of the epistemological, metaphysical and ethical themes that continue to stand at the (...)
     
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  18.  20
    Thinking Matter: Materialism in Eighteenth-Century Britain.John W. Yolton - 1983 - University of Minnesota Press.
    This book, a reevaluation of a major issue in modern philosophy, explores the controversy that grew out of John Locke's suggestion, in the Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690), that God could give to matter the power of thought.
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  19.  43
    Eighteenth-Century Aesthetics and the Reconstruction of Art.Paul Mattick (ed.) - 1993 - Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of essays explores the rise of aesthetics as a response to, and as a part of, the reshaping of the arts in modern society. The theories of art developed under the name of 'aesthetics' in the eighteenth century have traditionally been understood as contributions to a field of study in existence since the time of Plato. If art is a practice to be found in all human societies, then the philosophy of art is the search for (...)
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  20.  14
    The Eighteenth Century Background. Studies on the Idea of Nature in the Thought of the Period.G. B. & Basil Willey - 1941 - Journal of Philosophy 38 (22):614.
  21.  15
    The Eighteenth-Century Denudation Dilemma and the Huttonian Theory of the Earth.Gordon L. Davies - 1966 - Annals of Science 22 (2):129-138.
  22.  14
    Was EighteenthCentury Sentimentalism Unprecedented?Andrew S. Cunningham - 1998 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 6 (3):381 – 396.
    Considers whether the sentimentalism that emerged in the literature and philosophy of the eighteenth century was something new in Western thought.
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  23.  15
    Eighteenth-Century Epicureanism and Rousseau on Liberty.Jared Holley - 2011 - History of European Ideas 37 (1):81-84.
  24. Eighteenth-Century British Aesthetics.Dabney Townsend - 1999
     
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  25. Of Liberty and Necessity: The Free Will Debate in Eighteenth-Century British Philosophy.James A. Harris - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    The eighteenth century was a time of brilliant philosophical innovation in Britain. In Of Liberty and Necessity James A. Harris presents the first comprehensive account of the period's discussion of what remains a central problem of philosophy, the question of the freedom of the will. He offers new interpretations of contributions to the free will debate made by canonical figures such as Locke, Hume, Edwards, and Reid, and also discusses in detail the arguments of some less familiar writers. (...)
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  26.  15
    Christian Deism in Eighteenth Century England.Joseph Waligore - 2014 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 75 (3):205-222.
    In eighteenth century England, there were thinkers who said they were Christian deists and claimed pure, original Christianity was deism. Most scholars do not believe these thinkers were sincere about their religious beliefs, but there are many good reasons to believe they were. Three English deists have the best claim to be considered Christian deists because they alone called themselves Christian deists or called their ideas those of a Christian deist. These three thinkers, Matthew Tindal, Thomas Morgan, and (...)
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  27.  69
    Eighteenth Century Elysiums: The Rôle of "Association" in the Landscape Movement.H. F. Clark - 1943 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 6:165-189.
  28.  18
    Eighteenth-Century Print Culture and the "Truth" of Fictional Narrative.Lisa Zunshine - 2001 - Philosophy and Literature 25 (2):215-232.
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  29.  18
    The Eighteenth Century Background. Studies on the Idea of Nature in the Thought of the Period. [REVIEW]B. G. - 1941 - Journal of Philosophy 38 (22):614-614.
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  30.  37
    Newton and Newtonianism in Eighteenth-Century British Thought.Eric Schliesser - 2013 - In James A. Harris (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century. Oxford University Press. pp. 41.
    This chapter describes various aspects of the impact on philosophy of Newton’s Principia. It shows how Newton’s achievement dramatically influenced debates over the way subsequent philosophers conceived of their activity, and thus prepared the way for an institutional and methodological split between philosophy and science. These large-scale themes are illustrated by attention to a number of detailed debates over the nature and importance of Newton’s legacy: debates concerning gravity and matter theory, the status of Newton’s “laws of motion”, the role (...)
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  31.  12
    Eighteenth-Century Aesthetics and the Reconstruction of Art.Paul Mattick - 1994 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 52 (4):489-490.
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  32.  8
    The Challenge of Colour: Eighteenth-Century Botanists and the Hand-Colouring of Illustrations.Kärin Nickelsen - 2006 - Annals of Science 63 (1):3-23.
    Summary Colourful plant images are often taken as the icon of natural history illustration. However, so far, little attention has been paid to the question of how this beautiful colouring was achieved. At a case study of the eighteenth-century Nuremberg doctor and botanist, Christoph Jacob Trew, the process of how illustrations were hand-coloured, who was involved in this work, and how the colouring was supervised and evaluated is reconstructed, mostly based on Trew's correspondence with the engraver and publisher (...)
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  33. Six Varieties of Cosmopolitanism in Late Eighteenth-Century Germany.Pauline Kleingeld - 1999 - Journal of the History of Ideas 60 (3):505-524.
    Cosmopolitanism is not a single encompassing idea but rather comes in at least six different varieties, which have often been conflated in previous literature. This is shown on the basis of the discussion in late eighteenth-century Germany (roughly, 1780-1800). The six varieties are: (1) moral cosmopolitanism, the view that all humans belong to a single moral community; political cosmopolitanism, which advocates (2) reform of the international political and legal order or (3) a strong notion of human rights; (4) (...)
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  34.  26
    Physics at Seventeenth and Eighteenth-Century Leiden: Philosophy and the New Science in the University.Edward G. Ruestow - 1973 - The Hague: M. Nijhoff.
    CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION: A NEW UNIVERSITY AND THE CHALLENGE OF THE NEW SCIENCE Despite the recent and continuing controversy concerning the proper role of ...
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  35.  6
    Networked names: synonyms in eighteenth-century botany.Bettina Dietz - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (4):1-20.
    This paper addresses early modern botanical nomenclature, the practices of identifying and publishing synonyms in particular, as a collaborative “information science”. Before Linnaean nomenclature became the lingua franca of botany, it was inevitable that, over time, the same plant was given several names by different people, which created confusion and made communication among botanists increasingly difficult. What names counted as synonyms and actually referred to the same plant had to be identified by meticulously comparing living and dried specimens of this (...)
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  36. Counter-Enlightenments: From the Eighteenth-Century to the Present.Graeme Garrard - 2005 - Routledge.
    The Enlightenment and its legacy are still actively debated, with the Enlightenment acting as a key organizing concept in philosophy, social theory and the history of ideas. Counter-Enlightenments is the first full-length study to deal with the history and development of the Counter-Enlightenment thought from its inception in the eighteenth century right through to the present. Engaging in a critical dialogue with Isiah Berlin's work, this book analyses the concept of Counter-Enlightenment and some of the most important conceptual (...)
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  37.  11
    Thinking Matter: Materialism in Eighteenth-Century Britain.Daniel Garber - 1985 - Journal of Philosophy 82 (12):729-734.
  38.  19
    Political Economy in the Eighteenth Century: Popular or Despotic? The Physiocrats Against the Right to Existence.Florence Gauthier - 2015 - Economic Thought 4 (1):47-66.
    Control over food supply was advanced in the kingdom of France in the Eighteenth century by Physiocrat economists under the seemingly advantageous label of 'freedom of grain trade'. In 1764 these reforms brought about a rise in grain prices and generated an artificial dearth that ruined the poor, some of whom died from malnutrition. The King halted the reform and re-established the old regime of regulated prices; in order to maintain the delicate balance between prices and wages, the (...)
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  39.  25
    Inventing Human Science: Eighteenth Century Domains.Christopher Fox, Roy Porter & Robert Wokler (eds.) - 1995 - University of California Press.
    A work of remarkable cross-disciplinary scholarship, this volume illuminates the origins of the human sciences and offers a new view of the Enlightenment that ...
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  40.  5
    An Eighteenth-Century View of Animal Communication.W. Keith Percival - 1982 - Semiotica 39 (1-2).
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  41. Distributive Justice Before the Eighteenth Century: The Right of Necessity.Siegfried Van Duffel & Dennis Yap - 2011 - History of Political Thought 32 (3):449-464.
    Until recently, few people would have doubted that the idea of distributive justice is old, indeed ancient. Several authors have now challenged this assumption. Most prominently, Samuel Fleischacker argued that distributive justice originates in the eighteenth century. If accurate, this would upset much of what we have taken for granted about an important part of the history of Western political thought. However, the thesis is manifestly flawed; and since it has already proven influential, it is important to set (...)
     
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  42.  4
    Eighteenth-Century Science and Radical Social Theory: The Case of Joseph Priestley's Scientific Liberalism.Isaac Kramnick - 1992 - In Edna Ullmann-Margalit (ed.), The Scientific Enterprise. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 1--31.
  43.  2
    Networked names: synonyms in eighteenth-century botany.Bettina Dietz - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (4):1-20.
    This paper addresses early modern botanical nomenclature, the practices of identifying and publishing synonyms in particular, as a collaborative “information science”. Before Linnaean nomenclature became the lingua franca of botany, it was inevitable that, over time, the same plant was given several names by different people, which created confusion and made communication among botanists increasingly difficult. What names counted as synonyms and actually referred to the same plant had to be identified by meticulously comparing living and dried specimens of this (...)
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  44.  1
    Some Eighteenth Century Ideas Concerning Aqueous Vapour and Evaporation.S. A. Dyment - 1937 - Annals of Science 2 (4):465-473.
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  45. The Concept of Disinterestedness in Eighteenth-Century British Aesthetics.Miles Rind - 2002 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (1):67-87.
    British writers of the eighteenth century such as Shaftesbury and Hutcheson are widely thought to have used the notion of disinterestedness to distinguish an aesthetic mode of perception from all other kinds. This historical view originates in the work of Jerome Stolnitz. Through a re-examination of the texts cited by Stolnitz, I argue that none of the writers in question possessed the notion of disinterestedness that has been used in later aesthetic theory, but only the ordinary, non-technical concept, (...)
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  46.  21
    The History of Eighteenth-Century Philosophy: History or Philosophy?K. Haakonssen - unknown
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  47.  45
    Liberalism and Enlightenment in EighteenthCentury Germany.James Schmidt - 1999 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 13 (1-2):31-53.
    Abstract The eighteenth?century controversy among Moses Mendelssohn, Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi, and Immanuel Kant undermines the tendency to equate liberalism with the Enlightenment. While the defender of the Enlightenment, Mendelssohn, championed defended such traditional liberal values as religious toleration, his arguments were often illiberal. In contrast, many of the views of his anti? Establishment opponent, Jacobi, are remarkably liberal. Kant's essays from the mid?i78os advanced a liberal conception of politics but a view of Enlightenment that was quite distant from (...)
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  48. David Hume and Eighteenth-Century America.Mark G. Spencer - 2005 - University of Rochester Press.
    Hume's works in Colonial and early Revolutionary America -- Historiographical context for Hume's reception in eighteenth-century America -- Hume's earliest reception in Colonial America -- Hume's impact on the prelude to American independence -- Humean origins of the American Revolution -- Hume and Madison on faction -- Was Hume a liability in late eighteenth-century America? -- Explaining "Publius's" silent use of Hume -- The reception of Hume's politics in late eighteenth-century America.
     
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  49.  14
    Some Theoretical Aspects of Eighteenth-Century Tables of Affinity—I.A. M. Duncan - 1962 - Annals of Science 18 (3):177-194.
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  50. Sensibility as Vital Force or as Property of Matter in Mid-Eighteenth-Century Debates.Charles T. Wolfe - 2014 - In Henry Martyn Lloyd (ed.), The Discourse of Sensibility: The Knowing Body in the Enlightenment. Springer. pp. 147-170.
    Sensibility, in any of its myriad realms – moral, physical, aesthetic, medical and so on – seems to be a paramount case of a higher-level, intentional property, not a basic property. Diderot famously made the bold and attributive move of postulating that matter itself senses, or that sensibility (perhaps better translated ‘sensitivity’ here) is a general or universal property of matter, even if he at times took a step back from this claim and called it a “supposition.” Crucially, sensibility is (...)
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