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  1.  6
    Mary Shelley’s ‘Romantic Spinozism’.Eileen Hunt Botting - forthcoming - History of European Ideas:1-18.
    ABSTRACT Mary Shelley (1797–1851) developed a ‘Romantic Spinozism’ from 1817 to 1848. This was a deterministic worldview that adopted an ethical attitude of love toward the world as it is, must be, and will be. Resisting the psychological despair and political inertia of fatalism, her ‘Romantic Spinozism’ affirmed the forward-looking responsibility of people to love their neighbors and sustain the world, including future generations, even in the face of seeming apocalypse. This history of Shelley’s reception of Spinoza begins with the (...)
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  2.  7
    The Early Rousseau’s Egalitarian Feminism: A Philosophical Convergence with Madame Dupin and ‘The Critique of the Spirit of the Laws’.Eileen Hunt Botting - 2017 - History of European Ideas 43 (7):732-744.
    ABSTRACTFeminists have long criticized Rousseau for his patriarchal political theory. But when his lesser-known writings on women from the 1740s are taken into account, including a nearly 900-page manuscript critiquing Montesquieu from a feminist perspective, we see how the early Rousseau robustly converged in feminist ideas with his employer Madame Louise Dupin, before he gradually diverged from this egalitarian school of thought over the course of the 1750s. I add to the evidence of the early Rousseau’s egalitarian response to ‘the (...)
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  3. Wollstonecraft, Mill, and Women's Human Rights.Eileen Hunt Botting - 2016 - Yale University Press.
    How can women’s rights be seen as a universal value rather than a Western value imposed upon the rest of the world? Addressing this question, Eileen Hunt Botting offers the first comparative study of writings by Mary Wollstonecraft and John Stuart Mill. Although Wollstonecraft and Mill were the primary philosophical architects of the view that women’s rights are human rights, Botting shows how non-Western thinkers have revised and internationalized their original theories since the nineteenth century. Botting explains why this revised (...)
     
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  4.  48
    Westernization and Women’s Rights.Eileen Hunt Botting & Sean Kronewitter - 2012 - Political Theory 40 (4):466-496.
    The publication in 1869 of Mill's Subjection ofWomen gave rise to philosophical and political responses beyond Western Europe on the relationship between Westernization and women's rights in developing, colonial, and post-colonial countries. Through the first comparative study of the Subjection of Women alongside the forewords to six of its earliest non-Western European editions, we explore how this book provoked local intellectuals in Russia, Chile, and India to engage its liberal utilitarian, imperial, Orientalist, and feminist ideas. By showing how Mill's Western (...)
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  5. New Directions in Theorizing Human Rights.Eileen Hunt Botting - 2016 - Journal of International Political Theory 12 (1):3-9.
    An introduction to a symposium of new articles on human rights, situating them in trends in contemporary human rights theory more broadly, including debates on moral versus political rights, women's human rights, children's rights, and disability rights. Symposium includes articles by feminist political theorists Brooke Ackerly, Nancy Hirschmann, Regina Kreide, Marina Calloni, and Eileen Hunt Botting.
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  6.  17
    Religion and Women’s Rights: Susan Moller Okin, Mary Wollstonecraft, and the Multiple Feminist Liberal Traditions.Eileen Hunt Botting & Ariana Zlioba - 2018 - History of European Ideas 44 (8):1169-1188.
    ABSTRACTWe trace Susan Moller Okin’s reception of Mary Wollstonecraft with respect to the relationship between religion and feminist liberalism, by way of manuscripts housed at Somerville College, Oxford and Harvard University. These unpublished documents – dated from 1967 to 1998 – include her Somerville advising file, with papers dated from 1967 to 1979; her 1970 Oxford B.Phil. thesis on the feminist political theory of Wollstonecraft, William Thompson, and J.S. Mill; her teaching notes on Wollstonecraft originating in 1978, for her course (...)
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  7.  28
    Wollstonecraft in Europe, 1792–1904: A Revisionist Reception History.Eileen Hunt Botting - 2013 - History of European Ideas 39 (4):503-527.
    Summary It has often been repeated that Wollstonecraft was not read for a century after her death in 1797 due to the negative impact of her husband William Godwin's Memoirs of the Author of a Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1798) on her posthumous reputation. By providing the first full-scale reception history of Wollstonecraft in continental Europe in the long nineteenth century?drawing on rare book research, translations of understudied primary sources, and Wollstonecraft scholarship from the nineteenth century to the (...)
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  8.  14
    Women’s Human Rights, Then and Now: Symposium on Eileen Hunt Botting’s Wollstonecraft, Mill, and Women’s Human Rights.Ruth Abbey, Linda M. G. Zerilli, Alasdair MacIntyre & Eileen Hunt Botting - 2018 - Political Theory 46 (3):426-454.
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  9.  12
    Symposium on Eileen Hunt Botting’s Wollstonecraft, Mill, and Women’s Human Rights.Ruth Abbey, Linda M. G. Zerilli, Alasdair MacIntyre & Eileen Hunt Botting - forthcoming - Political Theory:009059171772531.
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  10.  13
    Women’s Human Rights May Be Unicorns, but They Can Fight Wicked Witches.Eileen Hunt Botting - 2016 - Journal of International Political Theory 12 (1):58-66.
  11. A Vindication of the Rights of Woman.Eileen Hunt Botting (ed.) - 2014 - Yale University Press.
    Mary Wollstonecraft’s visionary treatise, originally published in 1792, was the first book to present women’s rights as an issue of universal human rights. Ideal for coursework and classroom study, this comprehensive edition of Wollstonecraft’s groundbreaking feminist argument includes illuminating essays by leading scholars that highlight the author’s significant contributions to modern political philosophy, making a powerful case for her as one of the most substantive political thinkers of the Enlightenment era. No other scholarly work to date has examined as closely (...)
     
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  12. The Wollstonecraftian Mind.Alan M. S. J. Coffee, Sandrine Berges & Eileen Hunt Botting - 2019 - London: Routledge.
    There has been a rising interest in the study of Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797) in philosophy, political theory, literary studies and the history of political thought in recent decades. The Wollstonecraftian Mind seeks to provide a comprehensive survey of her work, not only placing it in its historical context but also exploring its contemporary significance. Comprising 38 chapters by a team of international contributors this handbook covers: -/- the background to Wollstonecraft’s work Wollstonecraft’s major works the relationship between Wollstonecraft and other (...)
     
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  13. Feminist Interpretations of Alexis de Tocqueville.Jill Locke & Eileen Hunt Botting (eds.) - 2009 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    This book moves beyond traditional readings of Alexis de Tocqueville and his relevance to contemporary democracy by emphasizing the relationship of his life and work to modern feminist thought. Within the resurgence of political interest in Tocqueville during the past two decades, especially in the United States, there has been significant scholarly attention to the place of gender, race, and colonialism in his work. This is the first edited volume to gather together a range of this creative scholarship. It reveals (...)
     
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