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Eilidh Beaton
University of Pennsylvania
  1.  38
    Crisis Nationalism: To What Degree Is National Partiality Justifiable During a Global Pandemic?Eilidh Beaton, Mike Gadomski, Dylan Manson & Kok-Chor Tan - 2021 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 24 (1):285-300.
    Are countries especially entitled, if not obliged, to prioritize the interests or well-being of their own citizens during a global crisis, such as a global pandemic? We call this partiality for compatriots in times of crisis “crisis nationalism”. Vaccine nationalism is one vivid example of crisis nationalism during the COVID-19 pandemic; so is the case of the US government’s purchasing a 3-month supply of the global stock of the antiviral Remdesivir for domestic use. Is crisis nationalism justifiable at all, and, (...)
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  2.  36
    Against the Alienage Condition for Refugeehood.Eilidh Beaton - 2020 - Law and Philosophy 39 (2):147-176.
    Under the 1951 Refugee Convention, there are two necessary conditions for refugeehood: a well-founded fear of persecution for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion and alienage – that is, being outside of one’s country of nationality or habitual residence. In 1985 Andrew Shacknove famously argued that both of these conditions should be rejected. Shacknove’s paper prompted much debate about the suitability of the persecution condition, but his rejection of the alienage requirement has (...)
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  3.  2
    The Right to Refuge, and What Happens Next.Eilidh Beaton - 2020 - Dissertation, University of Pennsylvania
    This dissertation concerns the rights of refugees. It is a project of two parts. Part One provides an account of the scope of the right to refuge in international law. Here, I reject both the alienage and persecution requirements for refugee-status-eligibility outlined in the 1951 Refugee Convention. Instead, I defend a definition that extends the right to refuge to any individual whose human rights are urgently threatened, who has no effective recourse to their home government, and whose interests can only (...)
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  4.  11
    Replacing the Persecution Condition for Refugeehood.Eilidh Beaton - 2020 - Archiv Fuer Rechts Und Sozialphilosphie 106 (1):4-18.
    In order to be eligible for refugee status under the 1951 Refugee Convention, an individual must have a well-founded fear of persecution for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion. A major problem with this condition for refugee status is that it leaves significant protection gaps, for it is generally agreed that individuals fleeing indiscriminate violence or generalized harm do not satisfy this requirement. In this paper, I evaluate existing arguments both defending and (...)
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  5.  2
    The Wrong of Removing the Long-Settled.Eilidh Beaton - 2021 - Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche 11 (1):183-215.
    In Chapter 5 of Justice for People on the Move, Gillian Brock argues that legitimate states may not remove long-settled undocumented immigrants. In this paper, I show that Brock’s claims in this chapter are compelling but limited in scope. Across each of the real-world examples she engages with throughout the chapter, there are clear and widely-acceptable case-specific reasons to think that these groups of undocumented people should be excused for violating immigration law. Partly as a result of her focus on (...)
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  6. The Right to Family Unification for Refugees.Eilidh Beaton - forthcoming - Social Theory and Practice.
    A handful of scholars have offered explanations for why states with otherwise restrictive immigration laws should relax their demands for people applying to immigrate for family reasons, but much less has been said about the family unification rights of refugees. This paper extends this existing discussion on family-based immigration to refugees, arguing that: (1) states have stronger duties to reunite refugee families; (2) some refugees should be entitled to reunite with “extended” family; (3) refugee family reunion should not be subject (...)
     
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