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  1.  17
    The Moral Limits of the Market: Science Commercialization and Religious Traditions.Jared L. Peifer, David R. Johnson & Elaine Howard Ecklund - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 157 (1):183-197.
    Entrepreneurs of contested commodities often face stakeholders engaged in market excluding boundary work driven by ethical considerations. For example, the conversion of academic scientific knowledge into technologies that can be owned and sold is a growing global trend and key stakeholders have different ethical responses to this contested commodity. Commercialization of science can be viewed as a good thing because people believe it bolsters economic growth and broadly benefits society. Others view it as bad because they believe it discourages basic (...)
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  2.  20
    Ethical Ambiguity in Science.David R. Johnson & Elaine Howard Ecklund - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (4):989-1005.
    Drawing on 171 in-depth interviews with physicists at universities in the United States and the UK, this study examines the narratives of 48 physicists to explain the concept of ethical ambiguity: the border where legitimate and illegitimate conduct is blurred. Researchers generally assume that scientists agree on what constitutes both egregious and more routine forms of misconduct in science. The results of this study show that scientists perceive many scenarios as ethically gray, rather than black and white. Three orientations to (...)
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  3.  10
    Is the Market Perceived to be Civilizing or Destructive? Scientists’ Universalism Values and Their Attitudes Towards Patents.Jared L. Peifer, David R. Johnson & Elaine Howard Ecklund - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (2):253-267.
    Is the market civilizing or destructive? The increased salience of science commercialization is forcing scientists to address this question. Benefiting from the sociology of morality literature’s increased attention to specific kinds of morality and engaging with economic sociology’s moral markets literature, we generate competing hypotheses about scientists’ value-driven attitudes toward patenting. The Civilizing Market thesis suggests scientists who prioritize universalism will tend to support patenting. The Destructive Market thesis, by contrast, suggests universalism will be correlated with opposition to patenting. We (...)
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  4.  1
    Gender Segregation in Elite Academic Science.Cassandra Tansey, Anne E. Lincoln & Elaine Howard Ecklund - 2012 - Gender and Society 26 (5):693-717.
    Efforts to understand gender segregation within and among science disciplines have focused on both supply- and demand-side explanations. Yet we know little about how academic scientists themselves view the sources of such segregation. Utilizing data from a survey of scientists at thirty top U.S. graduate programs in physics and biology and semistructured interviews with 150 of them, this article examines the reasons academic scientists provide for differences in the distribution of women in biology and physics. In quantitative analyses, gender is (...)
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  5. Korean American Evangelicals: New Models for Civic Life.Elaine Howard Ecklund - 2006
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  6. Science–Religion Boundaries in Indian Scientific Workplaces.Simranjit Khalsa, Brenton Kalinowski, Brandon Vaidyanathan & Elaine Howard Ecklund - 2022 - Zygon 57 (2):322-343.
    Zygon®, Volume 57, Issue 2, Page 322-343, June 2022.
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  7.  12
    A Way Forward for Sociological Research on Science and Religion: A Review and a Riff.Elaine Howard Ecklund, Sharan Kaur Mehta & Daniel Bolger - 2019 - Zygon 54 (3):634-647.
    John Evans’s new book Morals Not Knowledge pushes scholars to rethink contemporary debates about religion and science by moving past the rhetoric of societal elites to examine the perspectives of everyday Americans, identifying the moral conflicts at the heart of debates. We review Evans’s key contributions while also extending and challenging his arguments, urging consideration of how renewed moral debates might be informed by a broader set of U.S. “publics.” Drawing on empirical research, we highlight four sets of voices that (...)
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  8.  1
    Book Review: Being Muslim: A Cultural History of Women of Color in American Islam by Sylvia Chan-Malik. [REVIEW]Elaine Howard Ecklund, Sharan Kaur Mehta & Jauhara Ferguson - 2019 - Gender and Society 33 (4):656-658.
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