Results for 'Eleatics'

73 found
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  1.  13
    Pythagoreans and Eleatics.J. E. Raven - 1948 - Cambridge University Press.
  2.  6
    The Eleatics and Aristotle on Some Problems of Change.A. R. Lacey - 1965 - Journal of the History of Ideas 26 (4):451.
  3. Advice for Eleatics.Sam Cowling - forthcoming - In Chris Daly (ed.), Palgrave Handbook of Philosophical Methods.
    Eleaticism ties ontology to causality by denying the impossibility of causally inert entities. This paper examines some challenges regarding the proper formulation and general plausibility of Eleaticism. After suggesting how Eleatics ought to respond to these challenges, I consider the prospects for extending Eleaticism from ontology to ideology by requiring all primitive ideology to be causal in nature. Surprisingly enough, the resulting view delivers an eternalist and possibilist metaphysical picture in the neighborhood of Lewisian modal realism.
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  4.  21
    Pythagoreans and Eleatics.Harold Cherniss & J. E. Raven - 1950 - Philosophical Review 59 (3):375.
  5. Tasks, Super-Tasks, and the Modern Eleatics.Paul Benacerraf - 1962 - Journal of Philosophy 59 (24):765-784.
  6.  22
    The Eleatics.G. B. Kerferd - 1952 - The Classical Review 2 (02):76-.
  7.  29
    The Eleatics Jean Zafiropulo: L'École Éléate. Parménide, Zénon, Mélissos. (Collection d'Études Anciennes.) Pp. 304. Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1950. Paper. [REVIEW]G. B. Kerferd - 1952 - The Classical Review 2 (02):76-77.
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  8.  28
    Wrestling with the Eleatics in Plato's Parmenides.Heather Reid & Lidia Palumbo - 2020 - In Athletics, Gymnastics, and Agon in Plato. Sioux City, IA, USA: pp. 185-198.
    This paper interprets the Parmenides agonistically as a constructive contest between Plato’s Socrates and the Eleatics of Western Greece. Not only is the dialogue set in the agonistic context of the Panathenaic Games, it features agonistic language, employs an agonistic method, and may even present an agonistic model for participation in the forms. The inspiration for this agonistic motif may be that Parmenides and his student Zeno represent Western Greece, which was a key rival for the mainland at the (...)
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  9.  10
    Pythagoreans and Eleatics.Harold Cherniss - 1950 - Philosophical Review 59 (3):375-377.
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  10.  62
    Pythagoreans and Eleatics[REVIEW]J. Tate - 1950 - The Classical Review 64 (3-4):109-111.
  11.  39
    A Note on the Eleatics.T. Whittaker - 1924 - Mind 33 (132):428-432.
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  12. A “Philosophical Hero”? Anaxagoras and the Eleatics.Montgomery Furth - 1991 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 9:95-129.
  13.  39
    Pythagoreans and Eleatics.John F. Callahan - 1950 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 25 (4):755-758.
  14.  13
    Pythagoreans and Eleatics: An Account of the Interaction Between the Two Opposed Schools During the Fifth and Early Fourth Centuries B.C. [REVIEW]John F. Callahan - 1950 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 25 (4):755-758.
  15.  11
    Inquiry and What Is: Eleatics and Monisms.Rose Cherubin - 2003 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (1):1-26.
    While Melissus argues for a numerical monism, Parmenides and Zeno undermine claims to unconditional or transcendental knowledge. Yet the work of Parmenides and Zeno is not merely critical or eristic, and does not imply that philosophical inquiry is futile. Instead it shows the importance of reflection on the way the requisites of inquiry are represented in its results, and entrains an axiological investigation to every ontological one.
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  16.  26
    Why Matter? Aristotle, the Eleatics, and the Possibility of Explanation.Rose Cherubin - 2005 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 26 (2):1-29.
    Aristotle introduced the notion of matter to Greek philosophy. His use of the term ὕλη was essentially original, and he was the first to explore this ὕλη thematically and theoretically. Why, though, did he introduce the notion of matter? It is important to note that Aristotle first invokes ὕλη, and first lays out what he means by it, in discussions about causes. In fact, Aristotle’s interest in matter is as a cause, as responsible for the way things are, not as (...)
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  17.  8
    Why Matter? Aristotle, the Eleatics, and the Possibility of Explanation.Rose Cherubin - 2005 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 26 (2):1-29.
    Aristotle introduced the notion of matter to Greek philosophy. His use of the term ὕλη was essentially original, and he was the first to explore this ὕλη thematically and theoretically. Why, though, did he introduce the notion of matter? It is important to note that Aristotle first invokes ὕλη, and first lays out what he means by it, in discussions about causes. In fact, Aristotle’s interest in matter is as a cause, as responsible for the way things are, not as (...)
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  18.  41
    Aristotle Confronts the Eleatics: Two Arguments on 'The One'.Daniel E. Gershenson & Daniel A. Greenberg - 1962 - Phronesis 7:137.
  19.  27
    Pythagoreans and Eleatics.William A. Gerhard - 1950 - New Scholasticism 24 (3):335-336.
  20.  9
    Raven, Pythagoreans and Eleatics.Benson Mates - 1949 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 43:59.
  21.  5
    Raven, Pythagoreans and Eleatics.Benson Mates - 1949 - Classical Weekly 43:59.
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  22.  11
    The Unwritten Philosophy and Other Essays.Pythagoreans and Eleatics.D. S. M., F. M. Cornford, W. K. C. Guthrie & J. E. Raven - 1951 - Journal of Philosophy 48 (5):162.
  23.  10
    21 The Atomists' Reply to the Eleatics.David J. Furley - 1994 - In Alexander P. D. Mourelatos (ed.), The Pre-Socratics: A Collection of Critical Essays. Princeton University Press. pp. 504-526.
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  24. Studies in Presocratic Philosophy Volume 2: The Eleatics and Pluralists.David Furley & Reginald E. Allen (eds.) - 2016 - Routledge.
    The articles in this volume deal with the four major philosophical positions of the presocratic period: The arguments of Parmenides and Zeno against earlier or contemporary pluralist theories The three pluralist responses of Empedocles, Anaxagoras and the early Atomists.
     
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  25. Structure and Relevance of the Aristotelian Critic Toward the Eleatics.Enrico Volpe - 2016 - Peitho 7 (1):149-166.
    The first book of the Aristotelian Physics may be considered as a sort of general introduction to the whole work. In particular, chapters 2 and 3 result very interesting for the foundation of the science of nature accord­ing to Aristotle; indeed, in these two chapters, the Stagirite criticizes the position of the Eleates Parmenides and Melissus. These two philoso­phers are considered as those who claim that change does not exist because the existence of the not-being is impossible to suppose. For (...)
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  26.  11
    The Unwritten Philosophy and Other Essays.Pythagoreans and Eleatics.D. S. M. - 1951 - Journal of Philosophy 48 (5):162-164.
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  27.  23
    Presocratic Studies - R. E. Allen, David J. Furley: Studies in Presocratic Philosophy, Vol. Ii: Eleatics and Pluralists. Pp. Viii + 440. London: Routledge, 1975. Cloth, £7·95. [REVIEW]G. B. Kerferd - 1978 - The Classical Review 28 (01):79-80.
  28. Tasks, Subtasks and the Modern Eleatics.Jon Laraudogoitia - 2016 - In Fabrice Pataut (ed.), Truth, Objects, Infinity. Springer Verlag.
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  29.  1
    Idealism in Early Greek Philosophy: The Case of Pythagoreans and Eleatics.Andrei Lebedev - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy 2 (1):25-35.
    1. There is a commonly held endoxon that idealism did not exist and could not exist before Plato, since the «Presocratics» did not yet distinguish between the material and the ideal etc. This preconception is based on the misleading conception of «Presocratics» as physicalists and the simplistic evolutionist scheme of Aristotle’s Metaph. A. In fact, religious and idealist metaphysics are attested in different archaic traditions before Plato, whereas «simple» physical theories of elements of the Milesian type did not exist before (...)
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  30. RAVEN, J. E. - Pythagoreans and Eleatics[REVIEW]A. C. Lloyd - 1950 - Mind 59:117.
     
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  31. Studies in Presocratic Philosophy. Volume II: Eleatics and Pluralists by R. E. Allen; David J. Furley. [REVIEW]Alexander Nehamas - 1977 - Isis 68:470-471.
     
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  32.  3
    Studies in Presocratic Philosophy. Volume II: Eleatics and PluralistsR. E. Allen David J. Furley.Alexander Nehamas - 1977 - Isis 68 (3):470-471.
  33. The Legacy of Parmenides: Eleatic Monism and Later Presocratic Thought.Patricia Curd - 2004 - Parmenides Publishing.
    Parmenides of Elea was the most important and influential philosopher before Plato. He rejected as impossible the scientific inquiry practiced by the earlier Presocratic philosophers and held that generation, destruction, and change are unreal and that only one thing exists. In this book, Patricia Curd argues that Parmenides sought to reform rather than to reject scientific inquiry, and she offers a more coherent account of his influence on later philosophers._ _The Legacy of Parmenides_ examines Parmenides' arguments, considering his connection to (...)
     
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  34.  25
    The Eleatic Challenge in Aristotle’s Physics I.8.Scott O’Connor - 2017 - Rhizomata 5 (1):25-50.
    In Physics I.8, Aristotle outlines and responds to an Eleatic argument against the reality of change. I defend a new reading according to which the argu- ment assumes Predicational Monism, the claim that each being can possess only one property. In Phys. I.2, Aristotle responds to Predicational Monism, which he attributes to the Eleatics; I argue that he uses this response to distinguish coin- cidental from non-coincidental becoming, a distinction he employs in Phys I.8 to resolve the argument against (...)
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  35.  62
    Parmenides and Presocratic Philosophy.John Palmer - 2009 - Oxford University Press UK.
    John Palmer develops and defends a modal interpretation of Parmenides, according to which he was the first philosopher to distinguish in a rigorous manner the fundamental modalities of necessary being, necessary non-being or impossibility, and non-necessary or contingent being. This book accordingly reconsiders his place in the historical development of Presocratic philosophy in light of this new interpretation. Careful treatment of Parmenides' specification of the ways of inquiry that define his metaphysical and epistemological outlook paves the way for detailed analyses (...)
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  36.  19
    Gli Eleati: Testimonianze E Frammenti.D. S. M. - 1940 - Journal of Philosophy 37 (2):51-51.
  37.  25
    Aristotle and the Eleatic One.Timothy Clarke - 2019 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    In this book Timothy Clarke examines Aristotle's response to Eleatic monism, the theory of Parmenides of Elea and his followers that reality is 'one'. Clarke argues that Aristotle interprets the Eleatics as thoroughgoing monists, for whom the pluralistic, changing world of the senses is a mere illusion. Understood in this way, the Eleatic theory constitutes a radical challenge to the possibility of natural philosophy. Aristotle discusses the Eleatics in several works, including De Caelo, De Generatione et Corruptione, and (...)
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  38. The Cambridge Companion to Early Greek Philosophy.A. A. Long (ed.) - 1999 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Western tradition of philosophy began in Greece with a cluster of thinkers often called the Presocratics, whose influence has been incalculable. They include the early Ionian cosmologists, Pythagoras, Heraclitus, the Eleatics , Empedocles, Anaxagoras, the atomists and the sophists. All these thinkers are discussed in this 1999 volume both as individuals and collectively in chapters on rational theology, epistemology, psychology, rhetoric and relativism, justice, and poetics. A chapter on causality extends the focus to include historians and medical writers.
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  39.  86
    The Eleatic and the Indispensabilist.Russell Marcus - 2015 - Theoria : An International Journal for Theory, History and Fundations of Science 30 (3):415-429.
    The debate over whether we should believe that mathematical objects exist quickly leads to the question of how to determine what we should believe. Indispensabilists claim that we should believe in the existence of mathematical objects because of their ineliminable roles in scientific theory. Eleatics argue that only objects with causal properties exist. Mark Colyvan’s recent defenses of Quine’s indispensability argument against some contemporary eleatics attempt to provide reasons to favor the indispensabilist’s criterion. I show that Colyvan’s argument (...)
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  40. Acosmism or Weak Individuals?: Hegel, Spinoza, and the Reality of the Finite.Yitzhak Y. Melamed - 2010 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (1):pp. 77-92.
    Like many of his contemporaries, Hegel considered Spinoza a modern reviver of ancient Eleatic monism, in whose system “all determinate content is swallowed up as radically null and void”. This characterization of Spinoza as denying the reality of the world of finite things had a lasting influence on the perception of Spinoza in the two centuries that followed. In this article, I take these claims of Hegel to task and evaluate their validity. Although Hegel’s official argument for the unreality of (...)
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  41. By Being, It Is: The Thesis of Parmenides.Nestor-Luis Cordero - 2004 - Parmenides.
    The adventure of philosophy began in Greece, where it was gradually developed by the ancient thinkers as a special kind of knowledge by which to explain the totality of things. In fact, the Greek language has always used the word onta , "beings," to refer to things. At the end of the sixth century BCE, Parmenides wrote a poem to affirm his fundamental thesis upon which all philosophical systems should be based: that there are beings. In By Being, It Is (...)
     
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  42.  28
    Atomism's Eleatic Roots.David Sedley - 2008 - In Patricia Curd & Daniel W. Graham (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Presocratic Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Presocratic atomism was one of the most influential of the early theories: both Plato and Aristotle thought of it as a major competing theory, and it was an important source for post-Aristotelian Hellenistic theories. It has been commonplace that the atomism developed first by Leucippus of Abdera and then by Democritus of Abdera was a reaction to the Eleatic arguments of Zeno and Melissus, but the details of that influence have sometimes seemed rather hazy. This article brings them into sharper (...)
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  43.  29
    The Eleatic and the Indispensabilist.Russell Marcus - manuscript
    The debate over whether we should believe that mathematical objects exist quickly leads to the question of how to determine what we should believe. Indispensabilists claim that we should believe in the existence of mathematical objects because of their ineliminable roles in scientific theory. Eleatics argue that only objects with causal properties exist. Mark Colyvan’s recent defenses of Quine’s indispensability argument against some contemporary eleatics attempt to provide reasons to favor the indispensabilist’s criterion. I show that Colyvan’s argument (...)
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  44.  45
    Aristotle’s Solution for Parmenides’ Inconclusive Argument in Physics I.3.Lucas Angioni - forthcoming - Eleatic Ontology and Aristotle.
    I discuss the argument Aristotle ascribes to Parmenides at Physics 186a23-32. I discuss (i) the reasons why Aristotle considers it as eristic and inconclusive and (i) the solution (lusis) Aristotle proposes against it.
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  45. Parmenides, Melissus, Gorgias.Johannes Hubertus Mathias Marie Loenen - 1959 - Assen, Netherlands, Royal Vangorcum.
  46.  29
    Parmenides and Plato's Parmenides.J. M. Rist - 1970 - Classical Quarterly 20 (2):221-229.
    In two of his dialogues especially, the Sophist and the Parmenides, Plato concerns himself at length with problems presented by the Eleatics. Despite difficulties in the interpretation of individual passages, the Sophist has in general proved the less difficult to understand, and since some of the problems at issue in the two works indicate the same or similar preoccupations in Plato's mind, it is worth considering how far an interpretation of the ‘easier’ dialogue can be used to forward an (...)
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  47. The Sirens of Elea: Rationalism, Monism and Idealism in Spinoza.Yitzhak Melamed - 2012 - In Antonia Lolordo & Duncan Stewart (eds.), Debates in Early Modern Philosophy. Blackwell.
    The main thesis of Michael Della Rocca’s outstanding Spinoza book (Della Rocca 2008a) is that at the very center of Spinoza’s philosophy stands the Principle of Sufficient Reason (PSR): the stipulation that everything must be explainable or, in other words, the rejection of any brute facts. Della Rocca rightly ascribes to Spinoza a strong version of the PSR. It is not only that the actual existence and features of all things must be explicable, but even the inexistence – as well (...)
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  48. Plato’s Parmenides.Samuel Scolnicov - 2003 - University of California Press.
    Of all Plato’s dialogues, the _Parmenides_ is notoriously the most difficult to interpret. Scholars of all periods have disagreed about its aims and subject matter. The interpretations have ranged from reading the dialogue as an introduction to the whole of Platonic metaphysics to seeing it as a collection of sophisticated tricks, or even as an elaborate joke. This work presents an illuminating new translation of the dialogue together with an extensive introduction and running commentary, giving a unified explanation of the (...)
     
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  49. Platon Und der Logische Eleatismus.Gerold Prauss - 1966 - Walter de Gruyter.
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  50. De Logos a Physis: Estudio Sobre El Poema de Parménides.José Solana Dueso - 2006 - Mira Editores.
    Parménides es uno de los pensadores más influyentes de la filosofía occidental. El presente libro ofrece una hipótesis hermenéutica que se puede resumir en dos afirmaciones esenciales: primera, Parménides, como todos los pensadores de su tiempo, era ante todo un físico o fisiólogo (como los denominó Aristóteles), cuyas inquietudes y aportaciones se expresan en la segunda parte de su poema Sobre la naturaleza. Esa parte, escasamente representada en los fragmentos conservados, exponía una teoría original que se caracterizaba por defender una (...)
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