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Elena Lieven [18]Elena V. M. Lieven [11]Elena Vm Lieven [1]
  1.  50
    The development of abstract syntax: Evidence from structural priming and the lexical boost.Caroline F. Rowland, Franklin Chang, Ben Ambridge, Julian M. Pine & Elena Vm Lieven - 2012 - Cognition 125 (1):49-63.
  2.  46
    A construction based analysis of child directed speech.Thea Cameron-Faulkner, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello - 2003 - Cognitive Science 27 (6):843-873.
    The child directed speech of twelve English‐speaking motherswas analyzed in terms of utterance‐level constructions. First, the mothers' utterances were categorized in terms of general constructional categories such as Wh‐questions, copulas and transitives. Second, mothers' utterances within these categories were further specified in terms of the initial words that framed the utterance, item‐based phrases such as Are you …, I'll …, It's …, Let's …, What did … The findings were: (i) overall, only about 15% of all maternal utterances had SVO (...)
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  3.  22
    Towards a lexically specific grammar of children’s question constructions.Ewa Dąbrowska & Elena Lieven - 2005 - Cognitive Linguistics 16 (3):437-474.
    This paper examines early syntactic development from a usage-based perspective, using transcripts of the spontaneous speech of two Englishspeaking children recorded at relatively dense intervals at ages 2;0 and 3;0. We focus primarily on the children’s question constructions, in an effort to determine (i) what kinds of units they initially extract from the input (their size and degree of specificity / abstractness); (ii) what operations they must perform in order to construct novel utterances using these units; and (iii) how the (...)
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  4.  16
    Two-year-old children's production of multiword utterances: A usage-based analysis.Elena Lieven, Dorothé Salomo & Michael Tomasello - 2009 - Cognitive Linguistics 20 (3).
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  5.  18
    Some Pieces Are Missing: Implicature Production in Children.Sarah F. V. Eiteljoerge, Nausicaa Pouscoulous & Elena V. M. Lieven - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
  6.  11
    Children's understanding of the agent-patient relations in the transitive construction: Cross-linguistic comparisons between Cantonese, German, and English.Angel Chan, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello - 2009 - Cognitive Linguistics 20 (2).
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  7.  9
    The acquisition of the active transitive construction in English: A detailed case study.Anna L. Theakston, Robert Maslen, Elena V. M. Lieven & Michael Tomasello - 2012 - Cognitive Linguistics 23 (1):91-128.
    In this study, we test a number of predictions concerning children's knowledge of the transitive Subject-Verb-Object (SVO) construction between two and three years on one child (Thomas) for whom we have densely collected data. The data show that the earliest SVO utterances reflect earlier use of those same verbs, and that verbs acquired before 2;7 show an earlier move towards adult-like levels of use in the SVO construction and in object argument complexity than later acquired verbs. There is not a (...)
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  8.  20
    The discourse bases of relativization: An investigation of young German and English-speaking children's comprehension of relative clauses.Silke Brandt, Evan Kidd, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello - 2009 - Cognitive Linguistics 20 (3).
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  9.  26
    Multiunit Sequences in First Language Acquisition.Anna Theakston & Elena Lieven - 2017 - Topics in Cognitive Science 9 (3):588-603.
    Theoretical and empirical reasons suggest that children build their language not only out of individual words but also out of multiunit strings. These are the basis for the development of schemas containing slots. The slots are putative categories that build in abstraction while the schemas eventually connect to other schemas in terms of both meaning and form. Evidence comes from the nature of the input, the ways in which children construct novel utterances, the systematic errors that children make, and the (...)
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  10.  18
    Iconicity affects children’s comprehension of complex sentences: The role of semantics, clause order, input and individual differences.Laura E. de Ruiter, Anna L. Theakston, Silke Brandt & Elena V. M. Lieven - 2018 - Cognition 171 (C):202-224.
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  11.  39
    Lexically Restricted Utterances in Russian, German, and English Child‐Directed Speech.Sabine Stoll, Kirsten Abbot-Smith & Elena Lieven - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (1):75-103.
    This study investigates the child‐directed speech (CDS) of four Russian‐, six German, and six English‐speaking mothers to their 2‐year‐old children. Typologically Russian has considerably less restricted word order than either German or English, with German showing more word‐order variants than English. This could lead to the prediction that the lexical restrictiveness previously found in the initial strings of English CDS by Cameron‐Faulkner, Lieven, and Tomasello (2003) would not be found in Russian or German CDS. However, despite differences between the three (...)
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  12. Two- and Four-Year-Olds Learn to Adapt Referring Expressions to Context: Effects of Distracters and Feedback on Referential Communication.Danielle Matthews, Jessica Butcher, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (2):184-210.
    Children often refer to things ambiguously but learn not to from responding to clarification requests. We review and explore this learning process here. In Study 1, eighty-four 2- and 4-year-olds were tested for their ability to request stickers from either (a) a small array with one dissimilar distracter or (b) a large array containing similar distracters. When children made ambiguous requests, they received either general feedback or specific questions about which of two options they wanted. With training, children learned to (...)
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  13.  9
    The acquisition of auxiliary syntax: BE and HAVE.Anna L. Theakston, Elena V. M. Lieven, Julian M. Pine & Caroline F. Rowland - 2005 - Cognitive Linguistics 16 (1):247-277.
    This study examined patterns of auxiliary provision and omission for the auxiliaries BE and HAVE in a longitudinal data set from 11 children between the ages of two and three years. Four possible explanations for auxiliary omission—a lack of lexical knowledge, performance limitations in production, the Optional Infinitive hypothesis, and patterns of auxiliary use in the input—were examined. The data suggest that although none of these accounts provides a full explanation for the pattern of auxiliary use and nonuse observed in (...)
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  14.  29
    The attention-grammar interface: Eye-gaze cues structural choice in children and adults.Paul Ibbotson, Elena V. M. Lieven & Michael Tomasello - 2013 - Cognitive Linguistics 24 (3).
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  15.  5
    Entrenchment effects in code-mixing: individual differences in German-English bilingual children.Elena Lieven, Ad Backus & Antje Endesfelder Quick - 2021 - Cognitive Linguistics 32 (2):319-348.
    Following a usage-based approach to language acquisition, lexically specific patterns are considered to be important building blocks for language productivity and feature heavily both in child-directed speech and in the early speech of children (Arnon, Inbal & Morten H. Christiansen. 2017. The role of multiword building blocks in explaining L1-L2 differences. Topics in Cognitive Science 9(3). 621–636; Tomasello, Michael. 2003. Constructing a language: A usage-based theory of language acquisition. Cambridge: Harvard University Press). In order to account for patterns, the traceback (...)
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  16. Familiar Verbs Are Not Always Easier Than Novel Verbs: How German Pre‐School Children Comprehend Active and Passive Sentences.Miriam Dittmar, Kirsten Abbot-Smith, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (1):128-151.
    Many studies show a developmental advantage for transitive sentences with familiar verbs over those with novel verbs. It might be that once familiar verbs become entrenched in particular constructions, they would be more difficult to understand (than would novel verbs) in non-prototypical constructions. We provide support for this hypothesis investigating German children using a forced-choice pointing paradigm with reversed agent-patient roles. We tested active transitive verbs in study 1. The 2-year olds were better with familiar than novel verbs, while the (...)
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  17.  42
    Semantics of the Transitive Construction: Prototype Effects and Developmental Comparisons.Paul Ibbotson, Anna L. Theakston, Elena V. M. Lieven & Michael Tomasello - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (7):1268-1288.
    This paper investigates whether an abstract linguistic construction shows the kind of prototype effects characteristic of non-linguistic categories, in both adults and young children. Adapting the prototype-plus-distortion methodology of Franks and Bransford (1971), we found that whereas adults were lured toward false-positive recognition of sentences with prototypical transitive semantics, young children showed no such effect. We examined two main implications of the results. First, it adds a novel data point to a growing body of research in cognitive linguistics and construction (...)
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  18.  14
    The Role of Animacy in Children's Interpretation of Relative Clauses in English: Evidence From Sentence–Picture Matching and Eye Movements.Ross Macdonald, Silke Brandt, Anna Theakston, Elena Lieven & Ludovica Serratrice - 2020 - Cognitive Science 44 (8):e12874.
    Subject relative clauses (SRCs) are typically processed more easily than object relative clauses (ORCs), but this difference is diminished by an inanimate head‐noun in semantically non‐reversible ORCs (“The book that the boy is reading”). In two eye‐tracking experiments, we investigated the influence of animacy on online processing of semantically reversible SRCs and ORCs using lexically inanimate items that were perceptually animate due to motion (e.g., “Where is the tractor that the cow is chasing”). In Experiment 1, 48 children (aged 4;5–6;4) (...)
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  19.  72
    “Frequent Frames” in German Child-Directed Speech: A Limited Cue to Grammatical Categories.Barbara Stumper, Colin Bannard, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (6):1190-1205.
    Mintz (2003) found that in English child-directed speech, frequently occurring frames formed by linking the preceding (A) and succeeding (B) word (A_x_B) could accurately predict the syntactic category of the intervening word (x). This has been successfully extended to French (Chemla, Mintz, Bernal, & Christophe, 2009). In this paper, we show that, as for Dutch (Erkelens, 2009), frequent frames in German do not enable such accurate lexical categorization. This can be explained by the characteristics of German including a less restricted (...)
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  20.  18
    Productivity of Noun Slots in Verb Frames.Anna L. Theakston, Paul Ibbotson, Daniel Freudenthal, Elena V. M. Lieven & Michael Tomasello - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (6):1369-1395.
    Productivity is a central concept in the study of language and language acquisition. As a test case for exploring the notion of productivity, we focus on the noun slots of verb frames, such as __want__, __see__, and __get__. We develop a novel combination of measures designed to assess both the flexibility and creativity of use in these slots. We do so using a rigorously controlled sample of child speech and child directed speech from three English-speaking children between the ages of (...)
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  21.  42
    Children's Acquisition of the English Past‐Tense: Evidence for a Single‐Route Account From Novel Verb Production Data.Ryan P. Blything, Ben Ambridge & Elena V. M. Lieven - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (S2):621-639.
    This study adjudicates between two opposing accounts of morphological productivity, using English past-tense as its test case. The single-route model posits that both regular and irregular past-tense forms are generated by analogy across stored exemplars in associative memory. In contrast, the dual-route model posits that regular inflection requires use of a formal “add -ed” rule that does not require analogy across regular past-tense forms. Children saw animations of an animal performing a novel action described with a novel verb. Past-tense forms (...)
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  22.  30
    The Effects of Animacy and Syntax on Priming: A Developmental Study.Leone Buckle, Elena Lieven & Anna L. Theakston - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  23.  13
    The semantics of the transitive causative construction: Evidence from a forced-choice pointing study with adults and children.Ben Ambridge, Claire H. Noble & Elena V. M. Lieven - 2014 - Cognitive Linguistics 25 (2):293-311.
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  24. Analogical structure mapping and the formation of abstract constructions : a novel construction learning study.Ben Ambridge, Micah B. Goldwater & Elena V. M. Lieven - 2018 - In Kristen Surett & Sudha Arunachalam (eds.), Semantics in language acquisition. John Benjamins.
     
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  25.  22
    German children's productivity with simple transitive and complement-clause constructions: Testing the effects of frequency and variability.Silke Brandt, Arie Verhagen, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello - 2011 - Cognitive Linguistics 22 (2):325-357.
    The development of abstract schemas and productive rules in language is affected by both token and type frequencies. High token frequencies and surface similarities help to discover formal and functional commonalities between utterances and categorize them as instances of the same schema. High type frequencies and diversity help to develop slots in these schemas, which allow the production and comprehension of novel utterances. In the current study we looked at both token and type frequencies in two related constructions in German (...)
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  26.  7
    Interactions between givenness and clause order in children’s processing of complex sentences.Laura E. de Ruiter, Elena V. M. Lieven, Silke Brandt & Anna L. Theakston - 2020 - Cognition 198 (C):104130.
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  27.  15
    German children use prosody to identify participant roles in transitive sentences.Thomas Grünloh, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello - 2011 - Cognitive Linguistics 22 (2):393-419.
    Most studies examining children's understanding of transitive sentences focus on the morphosyntactic properties of the construction and ignore prosody. But adults use prosody in many different ways to interpret ambiguous sentences. In two studies we investigated whether 5-year-old German children use prosody to determine participant roles in object-first (OVS) sentences with novel verbs (i.e., whether they use prosodic marking to overrule word order as a cue). Results showed that children identify participant roles better in this atypically ordered construction when sentences (...)
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  28.  17
    Developing constructions.Elena Lieven - 2009 - Cognitive Linguistics 20 (1).
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  29.  20
    Pronoun co-referencing errors: Challenges for generativist and usage-based accounts.Danielle Matthews, Elena Lieven, Anna Theakston & Michael Tomasello - 2009 - Cognitive Linguistics 20 (3).
  30.  21
    Discourse Particles and Belief Reasoning: The Case of German doch.Daniel Schmerse, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello - 2014 - Journal of Semantics 31 (1):fft001.
    Next SectionDiscourse particles typically express the attitudes of interlocutors with respect to the propositional content of an utterance – for example, marking whether or not a speaker believes the content of the proposition that she uttered. In German, the particle doch – which has no direct English translation – is commonly used to correct a belief that is thought to be common ground among those present. We asked whether German adults and 5-year-olds are able to infer that a speaker who (...)
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