Order:
  1.  15
    Priority setting and personal health responsibility: an analysis of Norwegian key policy documents.Gloria Traina & Eli Feiring - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (1):39-45.
    BackgroundThe idea that individuals are responsible for their health has been the focus of debate in the theoretical literature and in its concrete application to healthcare policy in many countries. Controversies persist regarding the form, substance and fairness of allocating health responsibility to the individual, particularly in universal, need-based healthcare systems.ObjectiveTo examine how personal health responsibility has been framed and rationalised in Norwegian key policy documents on priority setting.MethodsDocuments issued or published by the Ministry of Health and Care Services between (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  10
    Paper: On the relevance of personal responsibility in priority setting: a cross-sectional survey among Norwegian medical doctors.Berit Bringedal & Eli Feiring - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (6):357-361.
    The debate on responsibility for health takes place within political philosophy and in policy setting. It is increasingly relevant in the context of rationing scarce resources as a substantial, and growing, proportion of diseases in high-income countries is attributable to lifestyle. Until now, empirical studies of medical professionals' attitudes towards personal responsibility for health as a component of prioritisation have been lacking. This paper explores to what extent Norwegian physicians find personal responsibility for health relevant in prioritisation and what type (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  3.  6
    Being Healthy, Being Sick, Being Responsible: Attitudes towards Responsibility for Health in a Public Healthcare System.Gloria Traina, Pål E. Martinussen & Eli Feiring - 2019 - Public Health Ethics 12 (2):145-157.
    Lifestyle-induced diseases are becoming a burden on healthcare, actualizing the discussion on health responsibilities. Using data from the National Association for Heart and Lung Diseases ’s 2015 Health Survey, this study examined the public’s attitudes towards personal and social health responsibility in a Norwegian population. The questionnaires covered self-reported health and lifestyle, attitudes towards personal responsibility and the authorities’ responsibility for promoting health, resource-prioritisation and socio-demographic characteristics. Block-wise multiple linear regression assessed the association between attitudes towards health responsibilities and individual (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  4.  5
    Social insurance, mutualistic insurance and genetic information.Eli Feiring - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (7):486-487.
    While a number of jurisdictions internationally prohibit insuring companies to be able to use genetic information in their risk classification, a voluntary code of practice permits insurers the limited use of predictive genetic test results in the UK. Jonathan Pugh1 offers a pluralist justice-based argument in support of the UK practice. Pugh’s position is developed to avoid what he sees as flaws with the current debate on insurers’ access to genetic information, including an alleged reliance on idealised assumptions about the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  14
    Reassessing insurers' access to genetic information: Genetic privacy, ignorance, and injustice.Eli Feiring - 2008 - Bioethics 23 (5):300-310.
    Many countries have imposed strict regulations on the genetic information to which insurers have access. Commentators have warned against the emerging body of legislation for different reasons. This paper demonstrates that, when confronted with the argument that genetic information should be available to insurers for health insurance underwriting purposes, one should avoid appeals to rights of genetic privacy and genetic ignorance. The principle of equality of opportunity may nevertheless warrant restrictions. A choice-based account of this principle implies that it is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  6.  12
    Avoiding hypersensitive reluctance to address parental responsibility in childhood obesity.Eli Feiring, Gloria Traina, Joar Røkke Fystro & Bjorn Hofmann - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (1):65-69.
    Childhood obesity is an increasing health problem. Prior empirical research suggests that, although discussing lifestyle behaviours with parents could help prevent childhood obesity and its health-related consequences, physicians are reluctant to address parental responsibility in the clinical setting. Therefore, this paper questions whether parents might be responsible for their children’s obesity, and if so, whether parental responsibility ought to be addressed in the physician–patient/parent encounter. We illustrate how different ideal-typical models of the physician–patient/parent interaction emphasise different understandings of patient autonomy (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  2
    Mapping out the arguments for and against patient non-attendance fees in healthcare: an analysis of public consultation documents.Joar Røkke Fystro & Eli Feiring - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (12):844-849.
    BackgroundPatients not attending their appointments without giving notice burden healthcare services. To reduce non-attendance rates, patient non-attendance fees have been introduced in various settings. Although some argue in narrow economic terms that behavioural change as a result of financial incentives is a voluntary transaction, charging patients for non-attendance remains controversial. This paper aims to investigate the controversies of implementing patient non-attendance fees.ObjectiveThe aim was to map out the arguments in the Norwegian public debate concerning the introduction and use of patient (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  8
    On the person in personal health responsibility.Joar Røkke Fystro, Bjørn Hofmann & Eli Feiring - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1):1-7.
    In this paper, we start by comparing the two agents, Ann and Bob, who are involved in two car crashes. Whereas Ann crashes her car through no fault of her own, Bob crashes as a result of reckless driving. Unlike Ann, Bob is held criminally responsible, and the insurance company refuses to cover the car’s damages. Nonetheless, Ann and Bob both receive emergency hospital treatment that a third party covers, regardless of any assessment of personal responsibility. What warrants such apparent (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark