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Elisabet Langmann [9]Elisabeth Langmann [3]
  1.  22
    Time for Values: Responding Educationally to the Call from the Past.Lovisa Bergdahl & Elisabet Langmann - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 37 (4):367-382.
    This paper rethinks the fostering task of the teacher in a time when it, paradoxically, has tended to become marginalized and privatized despite its public urgency. Following post-holocaust thinkers such as Hannah Arendt and Zygmunt Bauman, the position explored here is radical in the sense that it takes ‘the crisis of traditions’ and the erosion of a common moral ground or value basis seriously, and it is conservative in the sense that it insists on responding educationally to the call from (...)
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  2.  25
    ‘Where are You?’ Giving Voice to the Teacher by Reclaiming the Private/Public Distinction.Lovisa Bergdahl & Elisabet Langmann - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (2):461-475.
    In a time of cultural pluralism and legitimation crisis, there is an increasing uncertainty among teachers in Sweden about with what right they are fostering other people's children. What does it mean to teach ‘common values’ to the coming generation? How do teachers find legitimacy and authority for this endeavour, not as family members or as politicians, but as teachers? To respond to this uncertainty, the paper takes the public/private distinction as a starting-point for rethinking the place of the school. (...)
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  3.  30
    Pedagogical postures: a feminist search for a geometry of the educational relation.Lovisa Bergdahl & Elisabet Langmann - 2018 - Ethics and Education 13 (3):1-20.
    Inspired by Adriana Cavarero’s recent work on maternal inclinations as a postural term, the overall purpose of this article is to seek out a geometry of the educational relation that is alien to the masculine myth of the ‘economic man’. Drawing on Jan Masschelein and Maarten Simons’s critique of the marketization of education, reading their giving ‘shape and form’ to the scholastic school through the geometry of Cavarero’s ‘maternal inclinations’, the article shows how images and metaphors associated with the posture (...)
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  4.  10
    Vulnerability, ageism, and health: is it helpful to label older adults as a vulnerable group in health care?Elisabeth Langmann - 2023 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 26 (1):133-142.
    Despite the diversity of ageing, society and academics often describe and label older persons as a vulnerable group. As the term vulnerability is frequently interchangeably used with frailty, dependence, or loss of autonomy, a connection between older age and deficits is promoted. Concerning this, the question arises to what extent it may be helpful to refer to older persons as vulnerable specifically in the context of health care. After analyzing different notions of vulnerability, I argue that it is illegitimate to (...)
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  5.  19
    “That’s just Future Medicine” - a qualitative study on users’ experiences of symptom checker apps.Regina Müller, Malte Klemmt, Roland Koch, Hans-Jörg Ehni, Tanja Henking, Elisabeth Langmann, Urban Wiesing & Robert Ranisch - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1):1-19.
    Background Symptom checker apps (SCAs) are mobile or online applications for lay people that usually have two main functions: symptom analysis and recommendations. SCAs ask users questions about their symptoms via a chatbot, give a list with possible causes, and provide a recommendation, such as seeing a physician. However, it is unclear whether the actual performance of a SCA corresponds to the users’ experiences. This qualitative study investigates the subjective perspectives of SCA users to close the empirical gap identified in (...)
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  6.  17
    Finding one’s way: a response to the idea of an education after progress.Elisabet Langmann - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (6):1119-1126.
    Inspired by the work of Hannah Arendt, this response article focusses on the tension between hope in the future and lost hope in the present inherent in the modern idea of progress. The backdrop of the Suite ‘Education after Progress’ is some of the interrelated challenges that we are facing today, such as climate change, new pandemics, mass migration, and the rise of populism. Drawing on different philosophical concepts and strands, the five articles in the Suite explore what it would (...)
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  7.  20
    Leaving no one behind: successful ageing at the intersection of ageism and ableism.Merle Weßel & Elisabeth Langmann - 2023 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 18 (1):1-11.
    BackgroundThe concept of ‘successful ageing’ has been a prominent focus within the field of gerontology for several decades. However, despite the widespread attention paid to this concept, its intersectional implications have not been fully explored yet. This paper aims to address this gap by analyzing the potential ageist and ableist biases in the discourse of successful ageing through an intersectional lens.MethodA critical feminist perspective is taken to examine the sensitivity of the discourse of successful ageing to diversity in societies. The (...)
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  8.  10
    Welcoming Difference at the Limit of Tolerance Education.Elisabet Langmann - 2010 - Philosophy of Education 66:337-345.
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  9.  17
    My Way to You: How to Make Room for Transformative Communication in Intercultural Education.Elisabet Langmann - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (2):233-245.
    As populations around the globe become increasingly culturally diverse, just inter-personal relations seem dependent on our ability to find new ways of communicating with people from other cultures whose values and linguistic strategies may vary from our own cultural practices. Hence, in the increasing body of literature on intercultural education, intercultural education means helping students to acquire the right language and communication skills for enabling mutual understanding and transformation between cultures. However, several post-colonial scholars have pointed out that there is (...)
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  10.  16
    Sustaining What is Valuable: Contours of an Educational Language About Values.Lovisa Bergdahl & Elisabet Langmann - 2020 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 54 (5):1260-1277.
    Journal of Philosophy of Education, EarlyView.
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  11.  37
    Facing ambivalence in education: a strange(r's) hope?Niclas Månsson & Elisabet Langmann - 2011 - Ethics and Education 6 (1):15 - 25.
    This article explores how our understanding of ambivalence would shift if we saw it as an inherent and essential part of the ordinary work of education. Following Bauman's sociology of the stranger and Derrida's deconstructions of hospitality, the article unfolds in three parts. In the first part we discuss the preconditions of modern education which since the Enlightenment has been guided by the postulate that there is and ought to be a rational order in the social world. In the second (...)
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  12.  18
    Educating the Senses: Explorations in Aesthetics, Embodiment and Sensory Pedagogy.Sharon Todd, Marit Honerød Hoveid & Elisabet Langmann - 2021 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 40 (3):243-248.
    This volume takes two different, albeit intertwined approaches. The first concerns a reformulation of aesthetics in education—one which highlights the sensory dimensions of educational experience. The second concerns a turn to the body and the senses as that which is deeply involved in practices of teaching and learning.
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