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Elisabeth Boetzkes [13]Elisabeth Airini Boetzkes [1]Elisabeth A. Boetzkes [1]
  1.  1
    Readings in Health Care Ethics.Elisabeth Airini Boetzkes & Wilfrid J. Waluchow (eds.) - 2000 - Broadview Press.
    Readings in Health Care Ethics provides a wide-ranging selection of important and engaging contributions to the field of health care ethics. The second edition adds a chapter on health care in Canada, and the introduction has been expanded to include discussion of a new direction in feminist naturalized ethics. The book presupposes no prior knowledge, only an interest in the bioethical issues that are shaping our world.
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  2.  14
    Genetic Knowledge and Third-Party Interests.Elisabeth Boetzkes - 1999 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (3):386-392.
    Recent discussions of genetic information have highlighted the need for ethical disclosure guidelines. For instance, the (Canadian) Royal Commission on New Reproductive Technologies points out the range of third-party interests in genetic information and the lack of clear ethical and professional guidelines governing its dissemination. Among the more worrying interests are those of insurance companies and prospective employers. However, also worrisome is the problem of negotiating the first-party interest in privacy (from which the professional obligation of confidentiality arises) and strong (...)
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  3.  27
    If You're an Egalitarian, How Come You're So Rich? G. A. Cohen Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2000, Xii + 233 Pp., $35.00. [REVIEW]Elisabeth Boetzkes - 2002 - Dialogue 41 (2):386-388.
    If You're an Egalitarian, How Come You're So Rich? is a persuasive extension of Cohen's critique of Rawls's egalitarianism, embedded in reflections on the inadequacies of Marxist theory, on the rationality of "nurtured" beliefs, on Cohen's own personal and intellectual journey, and, finally, on the issue named in the title, the responsibility of the wealthy just in an unjust society. It is an uneven, but highly readable, book. Based on Cohen's 1996 Gifford Lectures, the book is divided into a Prospectus (...)
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  4.  3
    Editors' Introduction: Toward an Inclusive Health Ethic for Humans and Ecosystems.Elisabeth A. Boetzkes & Jason Scott Robert - 2000 - Ethics and the Environment 5 (2):143-151.
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  5. Jonathan Glover and Others, Ethics of New Reproductive Technologies Reviewed By.Elisabeth Boetzkes - 1990 - Philosophy in Review 10 (8):311-313.
     
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  6. James M. Humber and Robert F. Almeder, Eds., Reproduction, Technology, and Rights Reviewed By.Elisabeth Boetzkes - 1996 - Philosophy in Review 16 (3):171-173.
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  7. Larry Gostin, Ed., Surrogate Motherhood: Politics and Privacy Reviewed By.Elisabeth Boetzkes - 1991 - Philosophy in Review 11 (2):99-101.
  8. Michael J. Coughlan, The Vatican, the Law and the Human Embryo Reviewed By.Elisabeth Boetzkes - 1991 - Philosophy in Review 11 (5):304-306.
     
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  9.  34
    Privacy, Property, and the Family in the Age of Genetic Testing: Observations From Transformative Feminism.Elisabeth Boetzkes - 2001 - Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (3):301–316.
  10. Robert F. Schopp, Automatism, Insanity, and the Psychology of Criminal Responsibility Reviewed By.Elisabeth Boetzkes - 1992 - Philosophy in Review 12 (4):294-296.
     
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  11.  6
    Secrecy, Integrity, Agency: Nurses and Genetic Terminations.Elisabeth Boetzkes, Deirdre Robert & Catherine Swanson - 2002 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 13 (2):124.
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