Results for 'Elisabeth Holzer'

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  1.  9
    Gender Differences in Digital Learning During COVID-19: Competence Beliefs, Intrinsic Value, Learning Engagement, and Perceived Teacher Support.Selma Korlat, Marlene Kollmayer, Julia Holzer, Marko Lüftenegger, Elisabeth Rosa Pelikan, Barbara Schober & Christiane Spiel - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    The spread of the COVID-19 pandemic quickly necessitated digital learning, which bore challenges for all pupils but especially for groups disadvantaged in a virtual classroom. As some studies indicate persistent differences between boys and girls in use of technologies and related skills, the aim of this study was to investigate gender differences in the digital learning environment students faced in spring 2020. Previous studies investigating gender differences in digital learning largely used biological sex as the only indicator of gender. This (...)
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  2.  14
    Covid-19 Schutzmaßnahmen in Alten- und Pflegeheimen: zwischen Autonomie und Fürsorge – Ergebnisse einer Interviewstudie.Magdalena Flatscher-Thöni, Elisabeth Holzer, Martin Pallauf & Christiane Kreyer - 2022 - Ethik in der Medizin 34 (2):221-238.
    Die vorliegende Interviewstudie untersucht ethische Herausforderungen des Pflegealltags in Einrichtungen der Langzeitpflege aus Sicht der Pflegepersonen während der Covid-19-Pandemie. Durch das explorative, wie auch deskriptive methodische Vorgehen liegen Interviewdaten vor, die vier Themenbereichen zugeordnet werden können, die eine komplexe und teilweise konfliktreiche Arbeits- und Lebenswirklichkeit der Langzeitpflege in der Pandemie aufzeigen. Zum einen werden von den Pflegepersonen die staatlich und institutionell getroffenen Schutzmaßnahmen sowie die daraus resultierenden Einschränkungen der persönlichen Freiheit der Bewohner:innen kritisch reflektiert und damit verbunden der Grad der (...)
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  3.  8
    COVID-19 protective measures in nursing homes: Between autonomy and care – Results of an interview study. [REVIEW]Magdalena Flatscher-Thöni, Elisabeth Holzer, Martin Pallauf & Christiane Kreyer - 2022 - Ethik in der Medizin 34 (2):221-238.
    Definition of the problem This interview study investigated ethical issues in long-term care facilities from the perspective of caregivers during the coronavirus disease pandemic. Due to the explorative as well as descriptive methodological approach, interview data are available and can be assigned to four central topics, which reveal a complex and sometimes conflictual reality of work and life in long-term care during the pandemic. On the one hand, the protective measures taken by the state and the institutions, as well as (...)
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  4.  10
    Elisabeth Gallas/Anna Holzer-Kawalko/Caroline Jessen/Yfaat Weiss (Hg.): Contested Heritage. Jewish Cultural Property after 1945, Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2020, 221 S. [REVIEW]Klaus-Peter Friedrich - 2022 - Zeitschrift für Religions- Und Geistesgeschichte 74 (3):289-291.
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  5.  3
    Emmanuel Levinas: ethics, justice, and the human beyond being.Elisabeth Louise Thomas - 2004 - New York: Routledge.
    This book explores Levinas's rethinking of the meaning of ethics, justice and the human from a position that affirms but goes beyond the anti-humanist philosophy of the twentieth century.
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  6.  8
    Astronomie und Anthroposophie.Elisabeth Vreede - 1980 - Dornach, Schweiz: Philosophisch-Anthroposophischer Verlag, Goetheanum.
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  7.  4
    Dauer und Wandel im Selbstverständnis der Wissenschaftsphilosophie.Elisabeth Ströker - 1988 - In Paul Hoyningen-Huene & Gertrude Hirsch (eds.), Wozu Wissenschaftsphilosophie?: Positionen und Fragen zur gegenwärtigen Wissenschaftsphilosophie. New York: W. De Gruyter. pp. 17-38.
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  8.  11
    On the Passage of a Few People Through a Rather Brief Moment in Time: The Situationist International, 1957-1972.Elisabeth Sussman, Peter Wollen, Greil Marcus, Mark Francis, Tom Levin, Mirella Bandini & Troels Anderson - 1989 - MIT Press (MA).
    These photographs, essays, drawings, and original texts document the rich agit-art legacy of the Situationist International, a group of European artists and writers who emerged from such avant-garde movements as COBRA, Lettrisme, and the Imaginary Bauhaus and from the breakup of surrealism to launch a strategy of art as cultural critique.
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  9.  6
    Georg Lukács' Heidelberger Kunstphilosophie.Elisabeth Weisser - 1992 - Bonn: Bouvier.
  10.  8
    Pour une analyse informatisée du nom propre titulaire. L’exemple du roman français des Lumières.Elisabeth Zawisza - 1997 - Lumen: Selected Proceedings From the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies 16:53.
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  11.  1
    Vormoderne oder Aufbruch in die Moderne?: Studien zu Hauptströmungen des Mittelalters: ein Beitrag zur Neuverortung der Epoche im Kontext pädagogischer Forschung.Elisabeth Zwick - 2001 - Hamburg: Kovač.
  12. Intentions: The Dynamic Hierarchical Model Revisited.Elisabeth Pacherie & Myrto Mylopoulos - 2019 - WIREs Cognitive Science 10 (2):e1481.
    Ten years ago, one of us proposed a dynamic hierarchical model of intentions that brought together philosophical work on intentions and empirical work on motor representations and motor control (Pacherie, 2008). The model distinguished among Distal intentions, Proximal intentions, and Motor intentions operating at different levels of action control (hence the name DPM model). This model specified the representational and functional profiles of each type of intention, as well their local and global dynamics, and the ways in which they interact. (...)
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  13.  15
    Innovative Care in Latin America: Definition, Justification and Ethical Principles.Ignacio Mastroleo & Felicitas Holzer - 2019 - In Eduardo Rivera-López & Martin Hevia (eds.), Controversies in Latin American Bioethics. Springer Verlag. pp. 145-176.
    The term “innovation” or “innovative care” has recently gained attention in the context of the use of novel and not yet fully validated medical interventions and technologies. Most notably, there have been various incidences of medical activities insufficiently validated for its regular use in healthcare that fall into this category, such as stem cell treatments, genome sequencing for diagnostic purposes, or novel reproductive technologies. Latin American countries are among the places where new and non-validated medical activities take place, notably due (...)
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  14. Slurring Perspectives.Elisabeth Camp - 2013 - Analytic Philosophy 54 (3):330-349.
  15.  21
    ‘VaxTax’: a follow-up proposal for a global vaccine pandemic response fund.Federico Germani, Felicitas Holzer, Ivette Ortiz, Nikola Biller-Andorno & Julian W. März - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (3):160-164.
    Equal access to vaccines has been one of the key ethical challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic. Most scholars consider the massive purchase and hoarding of vaccines by high-income countries, especially at the beginning of the pandemic, to be unjust towards the vulnerable living in low-income countries. A recent proposal by Andreas Albertsen of a vaccine tax has been put forward to remedy this problem. Under such a scheme, high-income countries would pay a contribution, conceptualised as a vaccine tax, dedicated to (...)
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  16. Marburg neo-Kantianism: The Evolution of Rationality and Genealogical Critique.Elisabeth Widmer - forthcoming - In Cambridge Handbook of Continental Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
  17. Thinking with maps.Elisabeth Camp - 2007 - Philosophical Perspectives 21 (1):145–182.
    Most of us create and use a panoply of non-sentential representations throughout our ordinary lives: we regularly use maps to navigate, charts to keep track of complex patterns of data, and diagrams to visualize logical and causal relations among states of affairs. But philosophers typically pay little attention to such representations, focusing almost exclusively on language instead. In particular, when theorizing about the mind, many philosophers assume that there is a very tight mapping between language and thought. Some analyze utterances (...)
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  18.  37
    A Descriptive Analysis of Environmental Disclosure: A Longitudinal Study of French Companies.Elisabeth Albertini - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 121 (2):233-254.
    For the last 15 years, companies have extensively increased their environmental disclosure relative to their environmental strategy in response to institutional pressures. Based on a computerized content analysis of the annual reports of the 55 largest French industrial companies, we describe environmental disclosure with respect to the different strategies implemented by companies over a period of 6 years. The results show that environmental disclosure becomes more and more technical and precise for all the companies. Environmental innovations are presented as a (...)
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  19. Perspectives in imaginative engagement with fiction.Elisabeth Camp - 2017 - Philosophical Perspectives 31 (1):73-102.
    I take up three puzzles about our emotional and evaluative responses to fiction. First, how can we even have emotional responses to characters and events that we know not to exist, if emotions are as intimately connected to belief and action as they seem to be? One solution to this puzzle claims that we merely imagine having such emotional responses. But this raises the puzzle of why we would ever refuse to follow an author’s instructions to imagine such responses, since (...)
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  20.  17
    Feminist Perspectives on Ethics.Elisabeth J. Porter - 1999 - Longman.
    Elisabeth Porter's guide to the development of feminist thought on ethics & moral agency surveys feminist debates on the nature of feminist ethics, intimate relationships, professional ethics, politics, sexual politics, abortion and reproductive choices.
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  21. Contextualism, metaphor, and what is said.Elisabeth Camp - 2006 - Mind and Language 21 (3):280–309.
    On a familiar and prima facie plausible view of metaphor, speakers who speak metaphorically say one thing in order to mean another. A variety of theorists have recently challenged this view; they offer criteria for distinguishing what is said from what is merely meant, and argue that these support classifying metaphor within 'what is said'. I consider four such criteria, and argue that when properly understood, they support the traditional classification instead. I conclude by sketching how we might extract a (...)
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  22. Sarcasm, Pretense, and The Semantics/Pragmatics Distinction.Elisabeth Camp - 2011 - Noûs 46 (4):587 - 634.
    Traditional theories of sarcasm treat it as a case of a speaker's meaning the opposite of what she says. Recently, 'expressivists' have argued that sarcasm is not a type of speaker meaning at all, but merely the expression of a dissociative attitude toward an evoked thought or perspective. I argue that we should analyze sarcasm in terms of meaning inversion, as the traditional theory does; but that we need to construe 'meaning' more broadly, to include illocutionary force and evaluative attitudes (...)
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  23.  15
    Sex differences in shock thresholds in rats and gerbils and the day-night cycle.William W. Beatty & Gerald A. Holzer - 1978 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 11 (2):71-72.
  24.  14
    Influence of luminance on hemispheric processing.Justine Sergent & Barbara A. Holzer - 1982 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 20 (4):221-223.
  25.  6
    Philosophie in Aktion: Demokratie - Rassismus - Österreich.Silvia Stoller, Elisabeth Nemeth & Gerhard Unterthurner (eds.) - 2000 - Wien: Turia + Kant.
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  26. Normenfragen der Wissenschaftstheorie.Elisabeth Ströker - 1984 - In Odo Marquard (ed.), Ethik der Wissenschaften? Philosophische Fragen. W. Fink.
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  27.  4
    Hegels Vorlesungen über die Philosophie der Weltgeschichte.Elisabeth Weisser-Lohmann & Dietmar Köhler (eds.) - 1998 - Bonn: Bouvier.
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  28. Putting Thoughts to Work: Concepts, Systematicity, and Stimulus‐Independence.Elisabeth Camp - 2009 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 78 (2):275-311.
    I argue that we can reconcile two seemingly incompatible traditions for thinking about concepts. On the one hand, many cognitive scientists assume that the systematic redeployment of representational abilities suffices for having concepts. On the other hand, a long philosophical tradition maintains that language is necessary for genuinely conceptual thought. I argue that on a theoretically useful and empirically plausible concept of 'concept', it is necessary and sufficient for conceptual thought that a thinker be able to entertain many of the (...)
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  29. Why metaphors make good insults: perspectives, presupposition, and pragmatics.Elisabeth Camp - 2017 - Philosophical Studies 174 (1):47--64.
    Metaphors are powerful communicative tools because they produce ”framing effects’. These effects are especially palpable when the metaphor is an insult that denigrates the hearer or someone he cares about. In such cases, just comprehending the metaphor produces a kind of ”complicity’ that cannot easily be undone by denying the speaker’s claim. Several theorists have taken this to show that metaphors are engaged in a different line of work from ordinary communication. Against this, I argue that metaphorical insults are rhetorically (...)
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  30. The Phenomenology of Action: A Conceptual Framework.Elisabeth Pacherie - 2008 - Cognition 107 (1):179 - 217.
    After a long period of neglect, the phenomenology of action has recently regained its place in the agenda of philosophers and scientists alike. The recent explosion of interest in the topic highlights its complexity. The purpose of this paper is to propose a conceptual framework allowing for a more precise characterization of the many facets of the phenomenology of agency, of how they are related and of their possible sources. The key assumption guiding this attempt is that the processes through (...)
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  31. Why maps are not propositional.Elisabeth Camp - 2018 - In Alex Grzankowski & Michelle Montague (eds.), Non-Propositional Intentionality. Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.
     
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  32. Jewellery as an indicator of gender subjectivity.Elisabeth G. Sledziewski - 2011 - In Wilhelm Lindemann & Joan Clough (eds.), Thinkingjewellery: On the Way Towards a Theory of Jewellery = Schmuckdenken: Unterwegs Zu Einer Theorie des Schmucks. Acc Distribution [Distributor].
     
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  33.  5
    Le xxie siècle peut-il être métaphysicien?Elisabeth G. Sledziewski - 1993 - Revue de Synthèse 114 (2):231-239.
    La métaphysique fut souvent critiquée depuis le développement du rationalisme moderne. Les postmodernes vont-ils continuer les critiques portées contre sa rigidité épistémologique, vont-ils répéter les attaques contre son totalitarisme éthique et politique? Beaucoup de philosophes contemporains le pensent. Mais ils peuvent se tromper. Notre temps a besoin d'une nouvelle définition de l'élément humain qui s'accorderait avec l’humanisme démocratique. Seule la métaphysique est capable de poser les fondations d’une philosophie des droits de l’homme, établissant l’égale dignité des personnes et des peuples (...)
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  34. The Prospects of Artificial Consciousness: Ethical Dimensions and Concerns.Elisabeth Hildt - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 14 (2):58-71.
    Can machines be conscious and what would be the ethical implications? This article gives an overview of current robotics approaches toward machine consciousness and considers factors that hamper an understanding of machine consciousness. After addressing the epistemological question of how we would know whether a machine is conscious and discussing potential advantages of potential future machine consciousness, it outlines the role of consciousness for ascribing moral status. As machine consciousness would most probably differ considerably from human consciousness, several complex questions (...)
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  35. A language of baboon thought.Elisabeth Camp - 2009 - In Robert W. Lurz (ed.), The Philosophy of Animal Minds. Cambridge University Press. pp. 108--127.
    Does thought precede language, or the other way around? How does having a language affect our thoughts? Who has a language, and who can think? These questions have traditionally been addressed by philosophers, especially by rationalists concerned to identify the essential difference between humans and other animals. More recently, theorists in cognitive science, evolutionary biology, and developmental psychology have been asking these questions in more empirically grounded ways. At its best, this confluence of philosophy and science promises to blend the (...)
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  36. Two Varieties of Literary Imagination: Metaphor, Fiction, and Thought Experiments.Elisabeth Camp - 2009 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 33 (1):107-130.
    Recently, philosophers have discovered that they have a lot to learn from, or at least to ponder about, fiction. Many metaphysicians are attracted to fiction as a model for our talk about purported objects and properties, such as numbers, morality, and possible worlds, without embracing a robust Platonist ontology. In addition, a growing group of philosophers of mind are interested in the implications of our engagement with fiction for our understanding of the mind and emotions: If I don’t believe that (...)
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  37. Metaphor and that certain 'je ne sais quoi'.Elisabeth Camp - 2006 - Philosophical Studies 129 (1):1 - 25.
    Philosophers have traditionally inclined toward one of two opposite extremes when it comes to metaphor. On the one hand, partisans of metaphor have tended to believe that metaphors do something different in kind from literal utterances; it is a ‘heresy’, they think, either to deny that what metaphors do is genuinely cognitive, or to assume that it can be translated into literal terms. On the other hand, analytic philosophers have typically denied just this: they tend to assume that if metaphors (...)
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  38.  22
    Music Interventions and Child Development: A Critical Review and Further Directions.Elisabeth Dumont, Elena V. Syurina, Frans J. M. Feron & Susan van Hooren - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  39. Beyond Automaticity: The Psychological Complexity of Skill.Elisabeth Pacherie & Myrto Mylopoulos - 2020 - Topoi 40 (3):649-662.
    The objective of this paper is to characterize the rich interplay between automatic and cognitive control processes that we propose is the hallmark of skill, in contrast to habit, and what accounts for its flexibility. We argue that this interplay isn't entirely hierarchical and static, but rather heterarchical and dynamic. We further argue that it crucially depends on the acquisition of detailed and well-structured action representations and internal models, as well as the concomitant development of metacontrol processes that can be (...)
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  40. The generality constraint and categorial restrictions.Elisabeth Camp - 2004 - Philosophical Quarterly 54 (215):209–231.
    We should not admit categorial restrictions on the significance of syntactically well formed strings. Syntactically well formed but semantically absurd strings, such as ‘Life’s but a walking shadow’ and ‘Caesar is a prime number’, can express thoughts; and competent thinkers both are able to grasp these and ought to be able to. Gareth Evans’ generality constraint, though Evans himself restricted it, should be viewed as a fully general constraint on concept possession and propositional thought. For (a) even well formed but (...)
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  41. Mood and gradability: An investigation of the subjunctive mood in spanish.Elisabeth Villalta - 2008 - Linguistics and Philosophy 31 (4):467-522.
    In Spanish (and other Romance languages) certain predicates select the subjunctive mood in the embedded clause, while others select the indicative mood. In this paper, I present a new analysis for the predicates that select the subjunctive mood in Spanish that is based on a semantics of comparison. The main generalization proposed here is the following: in Spanish, a predicate selects the subjunctive mood in its embedded proposition if the proposition is compared to its contextual alternatives on a scale introduced (...)
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  42.  35
    Redoing Care: Societal Transformation through Critical Practice.Elisabeth Conradi - 2015 - Ethics and Social Welfare 9 (2):113-129.
  43.  8
    Rebound and Spillovers: Prosumers in Transition.Elisabeth Dütschke, Ray Galvin & Iska Brunzema - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Generating energy by renewable sources like wind, sun or water has led to the emergence of “clean” energy that is generally available at low cost to the environment and is generated from seemingly unbounded resources. Many countries have implemented schemes to support the diffusion of renewable energies. The diffusion of micro-generation technologies like roof-top photovoltaics is one of the success stories within the energy transition and has been significantly driven—at least in countries such as Germany—by households. As these households usually (...)
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  44.  14
    Etisk kompetanseheving i norske kommuner – hva er gjort, og hva har vært levedyktig over tid?Elisabeth Gjerberg, Lillian Lillemoen, Anne Dreyer, Reidar Pedersen & Reidun Førde - 2014 - Etikk I Praksis - Nordic Journal of Applied Ethics 2 (2):31-49.
    De senere år har pleie- og omsorgstjenesten i mange norske kommuner startet med ulike former for etikkarbeid, oftest initiert av KS’ prosjekt “Samarbeid om etisk kompetanseheving”. Hensikten med vår studie var å evaluere innsatsen i de kommunene som deltok i prosjektet fra starten av, med vekt på hvilke tiltak som var iverksatt, hvilke virksomheter dette omfattet, og om tiltakene har fortsatt utover prosjektperioden. Studien har et kvalitativt design. Materialet er hovedsakelig basert på telefonintervjuer med kontaktpersoner for etikksatsingen i 34 kommuner. (...)
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  45.  54
    Simple and Compound Drugs in Late Renaissance Medicine: The Pharmacology of Andrea Cesalpino (1593).Elisabeth Moreau - 2023 - In Fabrizio Baldassarri & Craig Edwin Martin (eds.), Andrea Cesalpino and Renaissance Aristotelianism. New York: Bloomsbury. pp. 209-223.
    From antiquity, Galenic physicians extensively discussed the active powers of simple and compound drugs. In their views, simple drugs, that is, single ingredients, acted according to their material qualities and the properties of their substance. As for compound drugs, their efficacy resulted from the mutual interaction of their ingredients and their modes of preparation. In the late Renaissance, Galenic physicians and naturalists, such as Leonhart Fuchs and Pietro Andrea Mattioli, attempted to explain these pharmacological properties or “faculties” at the intersection (...)
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  46.  18
    Can Politics Practice Compassion?Elisabeth Porter - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (4):97-123.
    On realist terms, politics is about power, security, and order, and the question of whether politics can practice compassion is irrelevant. The author argues that a politics of compassion is possible and necessary in order to address human security needs. She extend debates on care ethics to develop a politics of compassion, using the example of asylum seekers to demonstrate that politics can practice compassion with attentiveness to the needs of vulnerable people who are suffering, an active listening to the (...)
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  47. Instrumental Reasoning in Nonhuman Animals.Elisabeth Camp & Eli Shupe - 2017 - In Kristin Andrews & Jacob Beck (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Animal Minds. Routledge. pp. 100-118.
  48.  16
    Charity or empowerment? The role of COVAX for low and middle‐income countries.Felicitas Holzer, Tania Manríquez Roa, Federico Germani, Nikola Biller-Andorno & Florencia Luna - 2022 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (1):59-66.
    What has the past reaction to the COVID-19 pandemic taught us? We have seen that many low and middle-income countries (LMICs) still lack access to vaccines, and it seems little progress has been made in the last few months and year. This article discusses whether the current strategies, most notably, vaccine donations by the international community and the COVID-19 global access facility COVAX, offer meaningful solutions to tackle the problem. At the centre of our analysis, we compare the concepts of (...)
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  49.  30
    Staff and family relationships in end-of-life nursing home care.Elisabeth Gjerberg, Reidun Førde & Arild Bjørndal - 2011 - Nursing Ethics 18 (1):42-53.
    This article examines the involvement of residents and their relatives in end-of-life decisions and care in Norwegian nursing homes. It also explores challenges in these staff—family relationships. The article is based on a nationwide survey examining Norwegian nursing homes’ end-of-life care at ward level. Only a minority of the participant Norwegian nursing home wards ‘usually’ explore residents’ preferences for care and treatment at the end of their life, and few have written procedures on the involvement of family caregivers when their (...)
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  50. Showing, telling and seeing.Elisabeth Camp - 2007 - The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 3 (1):1-24.
    Theorists often associate certain “poetic” qualities with metaphor – most especially, producing an open-ended, holistic perspective which is evocative, imagistic and affectively-laden. I argue that, on the one hand, non-cognitivists are wrong to claim that metaphors only produce such perspectives: like ordinary literal speech, they also serve to undertake claims and other speech acts with propositional content. On the other hand, contextualists are wrong to assimilate metaphor to literal loose talk: metaphors depend on using one thing as a perspective for (...)
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