Results for 'Elizabeth Breckenridge Caldwell'

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  1.  4
    James Hart. Who One Is. Book I: Meontology of the “I”; A Transcendental Phenomenology. Phaenomenologica 189. New York: Springer, 2009. Pp. Xvi‐566. Who One Is. Book II: Existenz and Transcendental Phenomenology. Phaenomenologica 190. New York: Springer, 2009. Pp. Xviii‐649. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Breckenridge Caldwell & Robert Sokolowski - 2010 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 41 (2):277-281.
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  2.  87
    Zechariah 8:1-8.Elizabeth F. Caldwell - 2001 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 55 (2):185-187.
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  3.  15
    Encompassing Multiple Moral Paradigms: A Challenge for Nursing Educators.Elizabeth Shirin Caldwell, Hongyan Lu & Thomas Harding - 2010 - Nursing Ethics 17 (2):189-199.
    Providing ethically competent care requires nurses to reflect not only on nursing ethics, but also on their own ethical traditions. New challenges for nurse educators over the last decade have been the increasing globalization of the nursing workforce and the internationalization of nursing education. In New Zealand, there has been a large increase in numbers of Chinese students, both international and immigrant, already acculturated with ethical and cultural values derived from Chinese Confucian moral traditions. Recently, several incidents involving Chinese nursing (...)
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  4.  3
    Human Teaching and Cumulative Cultural Evolution.Christine A. Caldwell, Elizabeth Renner & Mark Atkinson - forthcoming - Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-20.
    Although evidence of teaching behaviour has been identified in some nonhuman species, human teaching appears to be unique in terms of both the breadth of contexts within which it is observed, and in its responsiveness to needs of the learner. Similarly, cultural evolution is observable in other species, but human cultural evolution appears strikingly distinct. This has led to speculation that the evolutionary origins of these capacities may be causally linked. Here we provide an overview of contrasting perspectives on the (...)
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  5.  26
    A Purely Spoken Monologue: The Poem and Heidegger's Way to Language.Elizabeth Caldwell - 2010 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 23 (4):267-284.
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  6.  32
    A Skirmish in the Popper Wars: Hutchison Versus Caldwell on Hayek, Popper, Mises, and Methodology.Bruce Caldwell - 2009 - Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (3):315-324.
    The paper is a reminiscence of T.W. Hutchison by way of a retrospective view of our debate over the relationship between the ideas of Karl Popper, F. A. Hayek, and Ludwig von Mises on methodology. Our dispute was part of a larger debate over the relevance of Popper's thought for economic methodology. Its place within the larger debate is also explored.
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  7.  51
    Malcolm and the Criterion of Sleep.Robert L. Caldwell - 1965 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 43 (3):339-352.
  8.  31
    Convergent Cultural Evolution May Explain Linguistic Universals.Christine A. Caldwell - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):515-516.
    Christiansen & Chater's (C&C's) argument rests on an assumption that convergent cultural evolution can produce similar (complex) behaviours in isolated populations. In this commentary, I describe how experiments recently carried out by Caldwell and colleagues can contribute to the understanding of such phenomena.
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  9. Visual Experience: A Semantic Approach.Wylie Breckenridge - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    Wylie Breckenridge offers a fresh understanding of the character of visual experience by deploying the methods of semantics. He develops a theory of what we mean by the 'look' sentences that we use to describe our visual experiences, and on that basis develops a theory of what it is to have a visual experience with a certain character.
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  10. Love, Death, and Revolution in Central Europe: Ludwig Feuerbach, Moses Hess, Louise Dittmar, Richard Wagner.Peter C. Caldwell - 2009 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    The philosopher of religion and critic of idealism, Ludwig Feuerbach had a far-reaching impact on German radicalism around the time of the Revolution of 1848. This intellectual history explores how Feuerbach’s critique of religion served as a rallying point for radicals, and how they paradoxically sought to create a new, post-religious form of religiosity as part of the revolutionary aim. At issue for the Feuerbachian radicals was the emergence of a humanity emancipated from the constraints of mere institutions, able to (...)
     
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  11. Transforming Sacrifice: Irigaray and the Politics of Sexual Difference.Anne Caldwell - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (4):16-39.
    : This essay examines Irigaray's analysis of politics and the political implications of her critique of sacrificial orders that repress difference/matter. I suggest that her descriptions of a fluid "feminine" can be read as an alternative symbolic not dependent on repression. This idea is politically promising in opening a possibility for justice and a nonantagonistic intersubjectivity. I conclude by assessing Irigaray's concrete proposals for sexuate rights and a civil identity for women.
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  12.  28
    Drawing the Eczema Aesthetic: The Psychological Effects of Chronic Skin Disease as Depicted in the Works of John Updike, Elizabeth Bishop, and Zelda Fitzgerald. [REVIEW]Karen E. Tatum - 2010 - Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (2):127-153.
    How might the psycho-social effects of chronic skin disease, its treatments (and discontents) be figuratively expressed in writing and painting? Does the art reveal common denominators in experience and representation? If so, how do we understand the cryptic language of these expressions? By examining the works of artists with chronic skin diseases—John Updike, Elizabeth Bishop, and Zelda Fitzgerald—some common features can be noted. Chronically broken skin can fracture the ego or self-perception, resulting in a disturbed body image, which leads (...)
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  13.  15
    Whiggish History for Contemporary Audiences. Implicit Religion in Shekhar Kapur's Elizabeth and Elizabeth: The Golden Age.José Igor Prieto-Arranz - 2015 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 14 (41):52-78.
    As James Chapman has famously put it in National Identity and the British Historical Film, historical films are “as much about the present in which they are made as they are about [the] past in which they are set.” This article discusses Shekhar Kapur’s aesthetically ground-breaking Elizabeth and its sequel Elizabeth: The Golden Age focusing on two main aspects, namely national identity issues and the representation of the enemy. Kapur’s Elizabeth films will first be placed within the (...)
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  14.  44
    Elizabeth Anscombe and the New Natural Lawyers on Intentional Action.Matthew B. O'Brien - 2013 - National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly (1):47-56.
  15. Of Sad and Wished-For Years: Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Lifelong Illness.Anne Buchanan & Ellen Buchanan Weiss - 2011 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (4):479-503.
    Victorian poets Elizabeth Barrett (1806-1861) and Robert Browning (1812-1889) first fell in love through letters, which they began to write to each other in 1845 (Figures 1 and 2). Their growing relationship, slowly progressing from letter to first encounter and eventual secret marriage in 1846, is documented in two volumes of letters, with a plot that unfolds as warmly and compellingly as the best page-turner invented by a novelist. Both were master wordsmiths, so the beauty of their letters is (...)
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  16.  14
    An Interview with Elizabeth Povinelli: Geontopower, Biopolitics and the Anthropocene.Elizabeth A. Povinelli, Mathew Coleman & Kathryn Yusoff - 2017 - Theory, Culture and Society 34 (2-3):169-185.
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  17.  10
    An Interview with Elizabeth Grosz: Geopower, Inhumanism and the Biopolitical.Elizabeth Grosz, Kathryn Yusoff & Nigel Clark - 2017 - Theory, Culture and Society 34 (2-3):129-146.
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  18.  75
    The Philosophy of Elizabeth Anscombe.Roger Teichmann - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    One of the most important philosophers of recent times, Elizabeth Anscombe wrote books and articles on a wide range of topics, including the ground-breaking monograph Intention. Her work is original, challenging, often difficult, always insightful; but it has frequently been misunderstood, and its overall significance is still not fully appreciated. This book is the first major study of Anscombe's philosophical oeuvre. In it, Roger Teichmann presents Anscombe's main ideas, bringing out their interconnections, elaborating and discussing their implications, pointing out (...)
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  19. A Counterexample to the Breckenridge-Magidor Account of Instantial Reasoning.Tristan Haze - 2016 - Journal of Philosophical Research 41:539-541.
    In a recent paper, Breckenridge and Magidor argue for an interesting and counterintuitive account of instantial reasoning. According to this account, in arguments such as one beginning with 'There is some x such that x is mortal. Let O be such an x. ...', the 'O' refers to a particular object, although we cannot know which. I give and defend a simple counterexample involving the notion of an unreferred-to object.
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  20.  87
    In Defence of Cornell Realism: A Reply to Elizabeth Tropman.Joseph Long - 2014 - Theoria 80 (2):174-183.
    Cornell realists claim, among other things, that moral knowledge can be acquired in the same basic way that scientific knowledge is acquired. Recently in this journal Elizabeth Tropman has presented two arguments against this claim. In the present article, I attempt to show that the first argument attacks a straw man and the second mischaracterizes the Cornell realists' epistemology and ends up begging the question. I close by suggesting that, given Tropman's own apparent views, her objections are also probably (...)
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  21.  22
    The Democratic University: The Role of Justice in the Production of Knowledge*: ELIZABETH S. ANDERSON.Elizabeth S. Anderson - 1995 - Social Philosophy and Policy 12 (2):186-219.
    What is the proper role of politics in higher education? Many policies and reforms in the academy, from affirmative action and a multicultural curriculum to racial and sexual harassment codes and movements to change pedagogical styles, seek justice for oppressed groups in society. They understand justice to require a comprehensive equality of membership: individuals belonging to different groups should have equal access to educational opportunities; their interests and cultures should be taken equally seriously as worthy subjects of study, their persons (...)
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  22.  13
    Don't Shoot the Messenger: Caldwell's Hayek and the Insularity of the Austrian Project.Greg Hill - 2005 - Critical Review 17 (1-2):69-88.
    Abstract Readers looking for an articulate, well?informed exposition of Hayek's multifaceted intellectual achievement will be pleased with Bruce Cald?well's new book, Hayek's Challenge: An Intellectual Biography of F. A. Hayek. Readers interested in a more critical consideration of Hayek's ideas, or in their ability to withstand cross?examination from the positions Hayek himself criticized, are less likely to be satisfied. But even for the latter group, Caldwell has performed a useful service, compressing the varied elements of Hayek's complex thought into (...)
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  23. Elizabeth Spelman, Gender Realism, and Women.Mari Mikkola - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (4):77-96.
    : Elizabeth Spelman has famously argued against gender realism. By and large, feminist philosophers have embraced Spelman's arguments and deemed gender realist positions counterproductive. To the contrary, Mikkola shows that Spelman's arguments do not in actual fact give good reason to reject gender realism in general. She then suggests a way to understand gender realism that does not have the adverse consequences feminist philosophers commonly think gender realist positions have.
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  24.  11
    The Minority Body by Elizabeth Barnes.Ron Amundson - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (2):5-9.
    Professor Elizabeth Barnes has produced a tightly and carefully reasoned philosophical examination of the significance of disability. It provides a clear defense of certain core principles of the disability rights movement in contrast to the many professional philosophers who consider that movement to be ill-conceived. An example of this tradition can be seen in the volume From Choice to Chance: Genetics and Justice, coauthored by four of the most prominent bioethicists of the turn of the century. I confess to (...)
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  25.  10
    Direct Brain Interventions, Changing Values and the Argument From Objectification – a Reply to Elizabeth Shaw.Sebastian Holmen - 2018 - Neuroethics 11 (2):217-227.
    This paper critically discusses the argument from objectification – as recently presented by Elizabeth Shaw – against mandatory direct brain interventions targeting criminal offenders’ values as part of rehabilitative or reformative schemes. Shaw contends that such DBIs would objectify offenders because a DBI “excludes offenders by portraying them as a group to whom we need not listen” and “implies that offenders are radically defective with regard to one of the most fundamental aspects of their agency”. To ensure that offenders (...)
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  26.  31
    Frankenstein and Feminism: Contemplating The Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein.Tanya Collings - 2011 - Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (1):66-68.
    Theodore Roszak's compelling parable, The Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein, provides an (eco)-feminist view of the “Night of the Living Dead Model” and suggests that only the equal union of “masculine” and “feminine” energies will help us resolve the current eco-crisis. This article further explores the consequences of the highly masculinized post-Enlightenment rationalism as demonstrated in Roszak's novel. Although this article agrees that there is a dangerous imbalance between natural/spiritual and scientific/rational viewpoints, it also stresses that the extreme genderification of (...)
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  27. Elizabeth Anscombe's "Modern Moral Philosophy": Fifty Years Later.D. Solomon - 2008 - Christian Bioethics 14 (2):109-122.
    Extracts This article introduces an issue of Christian bioethics which examines the significance of Elizabeth Anscombe's classic article, “Modern Moral Philosophy”, on the 50th anniversary of its publication. The manifold influences of this article are explored in some detail and the current status of the three famous theses put forward by Anscombe in the article is assessed. This article also briefly introduces the other articles in this issue and loactes them within the general framework of contemporary discussions of Anscombe's (...)
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  28.  14
    I—Elizabeth Anderson: Expanding the Egalitarian Toolbox: Equality and Bureaucracy.Elizabeth Anderson - 2008 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 82 (1):139-160.
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  29.  26
    ACPQ Special Issue on Elizabeth Anscombe : Editor's Introduction.John Joseph Haldane - unknown
    Introduction to Special Issue of the American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly on The Philosophy of Elizabeth Anscombe.
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  30. Princess Elizabeth and Descartes: The Union of Soul and Body and the Practice of Philosophy.Lisa Shapiro - 1999 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (3):503 – 520.
    (1999). Princess Elizabeth and Descartes: The union of soul and body and the practice of philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 7, No. 3, pp. 503-520. doi: 10.1080/09608789908571042.
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  31.  14
    ‘Saints and Heroes’: Elizabeth M. Pybus.Elizabeth M. Pybus - 1982 - Philosophy 57 (220):193-199.
    In his article ‘Saints and Heroes’, Urmson argues that traditional moral theories allow at most for a threefold classification of actions in terms of their worth, and that they are therefore unsatisfactory. Since the conclusion of his argument has led to the widespread use of the term ‘acts of supererogation’, and since I do not believe that such acts exist, I propose to argue that the actions with which he is concerned not only can, but should, be contained within the (...)
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  32.  67
    Review: Elizabeth Brake, Minimizing Marriage: Marriage, Morality, and the Law. [REVIEW]Ralph Wedgwood - 2012 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
    This is a review of Elizabeth Brake's book Minimizing Marriage: Marriage, Morality, and the Law (Oxford University Press, 2012).
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  33.  13
    Feminist Theory and Historical Practice: Rereading Elizabeth Blackwell.Regina Morantz-Sanchez - 1992 - History and Theory 31 (4):51-69.
    This essay assesses the value of social constructivist theories of science to the history of medicine. It highlights particularly the ways in which feminist theorists have turned their attention to gender as a category of analysis in scientific thinking, producing an approach to modern science that asks how it became identified with "male" objectivity, reason, and mind, set in opposition to "female" subjectivity, feeling, and nature.In the history of medicine this new work has allowed a group of scholars to better (...)
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  34.  10
    The Role of Darwin in Elizabeth Grosz's Deleuzian Feminist Theory: Sexual Difference, Ontology, and Intervention.Tuija Pulkkinen - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (2):279-295.
    In this article on Elizabeth Grosz's philosophy and its implications for discussions about feminist theory, I first suggest that Charles Darwin plays a particular role in Grosz's recent ontological thought. This role is to provide help in joining together two incompatible sources in her work: Gilles Deleuze's monistic ontology of a constant flow of new differentiations, on the one hand, and Luce Irigaray's thought of sexual difference as the primary ontological difference, on the other. I argue that Grosz's intellectual (...)
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  35. Logic, Cause & Action: Essays in Honour of Elizabeth Anscombe.G. E. M. Anscombe & Roger Teichmann (eds.) - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    Elizabeth Anscombe is among the most distinguished and original philosophers alive today. Her work has ranged over many areas of philosophy, including metaphysics, ethics, the philosophy of mind and action, and the philosophy of religion. In each of these areas she has made seminal contributions. The essays in this book reflect the breadth of her interests and the esteem in which she is held by her colleagues. The distinguished contributors include Michael Dunnett, Nancy Cartwright, Peter Geach and Philippa Foot; (...)
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  36.  37
    Reply to Amini and Caldwell, “Boghossian’s Refutation of Relativism”.Paul Boghossian - 2012 - International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 2 (1):45-49.
    Majid Amini and Christopher Caldwell charge that I misconstrue the relation between relativism and constructivism, on the one hand, and between relativism and skepticism, on the other. In this brief response, I rebut their charges.
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  37.  67
    Commentary on Elizabeth Corey's Interpretation of Michael Oakeshott.Efraim Podoksik - 2009 - Zygon 44 (1):223-226.
    Elizabeth Corey suggests that in order to understand Michael Oakeshott's worldview one should pay special attention to two subjects, religion and aesthetics, and analyze the connection between these two realms and the idea of practical life in general and of politics in particular. Her book provides a sympathetic but also critical conversation with Oakeshott's ideas, ultimately offering us a coherent picture of the place of the religious, poetical, and political in the totality of his thought. Corey persuasively shows that (...)
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  38.  7
    A Counter-Colonial Speculation on Elizabeth Rata’s –Ism.Mika Carl - 2016 - Journal of World Philosophies 1 (1).
    In Maori thought, the possibility exists for a sort of lateral thinking that does not necessarily directly respond to another’s utterance or opinion but that considers some of the creative and arbitrary themes that arise. In this article, I employ this counter-colonial speculation, keeping in mind a Maori worldview whilst thinking in the wake of Elizabeth Rata’s “Ethnic Ideologies in New Zealand Education: What’s Wrong with Kaupapa Maori?” The speculative powers that Maori have at our disposal here have undoubtedly (...)
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  39.  22
    CQ Interview: Stem Cell Science and Politics: A Talk with Elizabeth Blackburn.Steve Heilig - 2005 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (2):214-217.
    Elizabeth H. Blackburn, Ph.D., is a leader in the area of telomere and telomerase research—in fact, in 1984 she codiscovered the ribonucleoprotein enzyme telomerase, opening up new potentials in cancer research and therapy. This and subsequent work has earned her numerous honors, not the least of which are the National Academy of Science Award in Molecular Biology, an Honorary Doctorate of Science from Yale University, the American Cancer Society Medal of Honor, and many more awards. Dr. Blackburn is a (...)
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  40.  24
    Hume the Moral Historian: Queen Elizabeth I.Wade L. Robison - 2013 - The European Legacy 18 (5):576-587.
    Hume was accused of partiality as soon as the first volume of his Histories reached the public. No better test can be found for whether he was partial than by looking at how he writes of Queen Elizabeth I. If his history is biased, we would expect her sex to make a difference to the history. We shall find, however, that Hume treats Elizabeth as a rational being who is a sovereign, and that he achieves, insofar as he (...)
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  41.  15
    ACPQ Special Issue on Elizabeth Anscombe.John Haldane - 2016 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 90 (2):171-180.
    Introduction to Special Issue of the American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly on The Philosophy of Elizabeth Anscombe.
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  42.  28
    Review of Elizabeth A. Wilson, Neural Geographies: Feminism and the Microstructure of Cognition. [REVIEW]John Sutton - 1999 - Philosophy in Review/ Comptes Rendus Philosophiques:299-301.
    Writing within and against the set critical practices of psychoanalytic-deconstructive-Foucauldian-feminist cultural theory, Elizabeth Wilson demonstrates, in this provocative and original book, the productivity and the pleasure of direct, complicitous engagement with the contemporary cognitive sciences. Wilson forges an eclectic method in reaction to the 'zealous but disavowed moralism' of those high cultural Theorists whose 'disciplining compulsion' concocts a monolithic picture of science in order to keep their 'sanitizing critical practice' untainted by its sinister reductionism. Her unsettling accounts of texts (...)
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  43.  26
    Conservatism, Feminism, and Elizabeth Fox-Genovese.Amy R. Baehr - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (2):101 - 124.
    This paper is a philosophical reconstruction of Elizabeth Fox-Genovese's thinking about women and feminism, and an inquiry into whether there is a conservative form of feminism. The paper argues that Fox-Genovese's endorsement of conventional social forms (like traditional marriage, motherhood, and sexual morality) contrasts strongly with feminism's criticism of these forms, and feminism's claim that they should be transformed. The paper concludes, however, that one need not call Fox-Genovese's thought "feminist" to recognize it as serious advocacy on behalf of (...)
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  44.  10
    Intolerable Wrong and Punishment: Elizabeth H. Wolgast.Elizabeth H. Wolgast - 1985 - Philosophy 60 (232):161-174.
    A common justification for retributive views of punishment is the idea that injustice is intolerable and must be answered. For instance F. H. Bradley writes: Why … do I merit punishment? It is because I have been guilty. I have done ‘wrong’… Now the plain man may not know what he means by ‘wrong’, but he is sure that, whatever it is, it ‘ought’ not to exist, that it calls and cries for obliteration; that, if he can remove it, it (...)
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  45.  8
    On Reuniting Poetry and Science: A Memoir of Elizabeth Sewell, 1919-2001.David Schenck & Phil Mullins - 2000 - Tradition and Discovery 27 (3):16-18.
    This essay is an obituary notice for Elizabeth Sewell, a long-time friend of Michael Polanyi and a well-known poet, novelist and critic.
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  46. Elizabeth A. Wilson, Neural Geographies: Feminism and the Microstructure of Cognition Reviewed By.John Sutton - 1999 - Philosophy in Review 19 (4):299-301.
    Writing within and against the set critical practices of psychoanalytic-deconstructive-Foucauldian-feminist cultural theory, Elizabeth Wilson demonstrates, in this provocative and original book, the productivity and the pleasure of direct, complicitous engagement with the contemporary cognitive sciences. Wilson forges an eclectic method in reaction to the 'zealous but disavowed moralism' of those high cultural Theorists whose 'disciplining compulsion' concocts a monolithic picture of science in order to keep their 'sanitizing critical practice' untainted by its sinister reductionism. Her unsettling accounts of texts (...)
     
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  47.  24
    Study Project in Phenomenology of the Body Elizabeth A. Behnke, Ph. D.Elizabeth A. Behnke - 1992 - Man and World 25 (521).
  48.  25
    Deities, Devils, and Dams: Elizabeth I, Dover Harbour and the Family of Love.David Wootton - 2009 - In Proceedings of the British Academy, Volume 162, 2008 Lectures. pp. 45.
    This lecture presents the text of the speech about Elizabeth I Queen of England delivered by the author at the 2008 Raleigh Lecture on History held at the British Academy. It explores the religious movement called the Family of Love and discusses Sir Walter Raleigh's knowledge about the discourse on Dover Harbour, which was later spuriously attributed to him. The lecture provides an excerpt and interpretation of Queen Elizabeth's poem titled On Monsieur's Departure.
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  49.  51
    The Knowledge Argument: A Response to Elizabeth Schier.David Hodgson - 2008 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (4):112-115.
    I much appreciated Elizabeth Schier's paper on Frank Jackson's knowledge argument, published in the January 2008 issue of Journal of Consciousness Studies (Schier, 2008) -- in part, I confess, because of resonances with my gestalt argument for free will (Hodgson, 2001; 2002; 2005; 2007a,b). I would like to offer two comments on this paper.
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  50.  7
    Elizabeth Anscombe's “Modern Moral Philosophy”: Fifty Years Later: Articles.David Solomon - 2008 - Christian Bioethics 14 (2):109-122.
    Extracts This article introduces an issue of Christian bioethics which examines the significance of Elizabeth Anscombe's classic article, “Modern Moral Philosophy”, on the 50th anniversary of its publication. The manifold influences of this article are explored in some detail and the current status of the three famous theses put forward by Anscombe in the article is assessed. This article also briefly introduces the other articles in this issue and loactes them within the general framework of contemporary discussions of Anscombe's (...)
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