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Elizabeth Burns [21]Elizabeth D. Burns [4]
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Profile: Elizabeth Denise Burns (Heythrop College)
Profile: Elizabeth Finneron-Burns (Oxford University)
  1. Julian Baggini: Philosophy: Key Themes and Philosophy: Key Texts. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Burns - 2004 - Think 2 (6):103-106.
  2. Essay Writing and Exam Preparation.Elizabeth Burns & Michael Lacewing - 2004 - In Elizabeth Burns & Stephen Law (eds.), Philosophy for AS and A2. Routledge.
  3. 'Ontological' Arguments From Experience: Daniel A. Dombrowski, Iris Murdoch, and the Nature of Divine Reality.Elizabeth D. Burns - 2013 - Religious Studies 49 (4):459-480.
    Dombrowski and Murdoch offer versions of the ontological argument which aim to avoid two types of objection – those concerned with the nature of the divine, and those concerned with the move from an abstract concept to a mind-independent reality. For both, the nature of the concept of God/Good entails its instantiation, and both supply a supporting argument from experience. It is only Murdoch who successfully negotiates the transition from an abstract concept to the instantiation of that concept, however, and (...)
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  4.  72
    Iris Murdoch and the Nature of Good.Elizabeth Burns - 1997 - Religious Studies 33 (3):303-313.
    Iris Murdoch's concept of Good is a central feature of her moral theory; in Murdoch's thought, attention to the Good is the primary means of improving our moral conduct. Her view has been criticised on the grounds that the Good is irrelevant to life in this world (Don Cupitt), that the notion of a transcendent, single object of attention is incoherent (Stewart Sutherland), and that we can only understand what goodness is if we see it as an attribute of a (...)
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  5.  54
    Classical and Revisionary Theism on the Divine as Personal: A Rapprochement?Elizabeth Burns - 2015 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 78 (2):151-165.
    To claim that the divine is a person or personal is, according to Swinburne, ‘the most elementary claim of theism’. I argue that, whether the classical theist’s concept of the divine as a person or personal is construed as an analogy or a metaphor, or a combination of the two, analysis necessitates qualification of that concept such that any differences between the classical theist’s concept of the divine as a person or personal and revisionary interpretations of that concept are merely (...)
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  6.  43
    Michael Martin on Divine Omniscience (2).Elizabeth Burns - 2005 - Think 4 (10):75-78.
    A response to the preceding article by Tom Wanchick.
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  7. Daniel Garber: What Happens After Pascal's Wager: Living Faith and Rational Belief. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Burns - 2011 - Philosophical Quarterly 61 (242):218-220.
  8.  28
    Brian Davies: The Reality of God and the Problem of Evil. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Burns - 2008 - Religious Studies 44 (1):118-123.
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  9.  37
    Mark Johnston: Saving God: Religion After Idolatry. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Burns - 2009 - The Philosophers' Magazine 47 (47):110-111.
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  10.  74
    Must Theists Believe in a Personal God?Elizabeth Burns - 2009 - Think 8 (23):77-86.
    The claim that God is a person or personal is, perhaps, one of the most fundamental claims which religious believers make about God. In Hinduism, Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva are represented in person-like form. In the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament God walks in the Garden of Eden , experiences emotions , and converses with human beings . In the New Testament, God communicates with his people, usually by means of angels or visions , and retains the ability to speak audibly, as (...)
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  11.  28
    Is There a Distinctively Feminist Philosophy of Religion?Elizabeth D. Burns - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (6):422-435.
    Feminist philosophers of religion such as Grace Jantzen and Pamela Sue Anderson have endeavoured, firstly, to identify masculine bias in the concepts of God found in the scriptures of the world’s religions and in the philosophical writings in which religious beliefs are assessed and proposed and, secondly, to transform the philosophy of religion, and thereby the lives of women, by recommending new or expanded epistemologies and using these to revision a concept of the divine which will inspire both women and (...)
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  12.  13
    Pamela Sue Anderson: Re-Visioning Gender in Philosophy of Religion: Reason, Love and Epistemic Locatedness. [REVIEW]Elizabeth D. Burns - 2015 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 77 (2):187-189.
  13.  5
    Where the Conflict Really Lies: Plantinga, the Challenge of Evil, and Religious Naturalism.Elizabeth D. Burns - 2014 - Philosophia Reformata 79 (1):66-82.
    In this paper I argue that, although Alvin Plantinga’s Felix Culpa theodicy appears on only two pages of his recent book Where the Conflict Really Lies: Science, Religion and Naturalism (2011) (i.e. 58-59), it is of pivotal importance for the book as a whole. Plantinga argues that there is superficial conflict but deep concord between science and monotheism, and that there is superficial concord but deep conflict between science and naturalism. I contend that the weakness of the Felix Culpa theodicy (...)
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  14.  8
    T. J. Mawson: Belief in God: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Burns - 2006 - Religious Studies 42 (4):492-497.
  15.  2
    "No Title Available: Book Review". [REVIEW]Elizabeth Burns - 2008 - Religious Studies 44 (1):118-123.
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  16.  25
    Heather Widdows: The Moral Vision of Iris Murdoch. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Burns - 2007 - Heythrop Journal 48 (5):846–847.
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  17.  12
    T. W. Bartel (Ed): Comparative Theology: Essays for Keith Ward. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Burns - 2004 - Religious Studies 40 (4):511-515.
  18.  9
    Daniel A. Dombrowski: Rethinking the Ontological Argument: A Neoclassical Theistic Response. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Burns - 2009 - Heythrop Journal 50 (4):719-721.
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  19.  8
    Anne Rowe (Ed): Iris Murdoch: A Re-Assessment. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Burns - 2007 - Heythrop Journal 48 (5):847–849.
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  20. Hypatia of Alexandria: Mathematician and Martyr. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Burns - 2008 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 99:609-610.
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  21. Michael A. B. Deakin.Hypatia of Alexandria: Mathematician and Martyr. 231 Pp., Figs., Tables, Apps., Index. Amherst, N.Y.: Prometheus Books, 2007. $28. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Burns - 2008 - Isis 99 (3):609-610.
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  22. Julian Baggini: Philosophy: Key Themes and Philosophy: Key Texts. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Burns - 2004 - Think 2 (6):103-106.
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  23. Philosophy for AS and A2.Elizabeth Burns & Stephen Law (eds.) - 2004 - Routledge.
    Although the syllabus for AQA Advanced Subsidiary and Advanced Level Philosophy has now changed, this textbook still serves as a helpful introduction to six key topics in Philosophy. Following a lively foreword by Nigel Warburton, author of Philosophy: The Basics, a team of experienced teachers from Heythrop College, University of London, devote a chapter each to * Theory of Knowledge * Moral Philosophy * Philosophy of Religion * Philosophy of Mind * Political Philosophy and * Philosophy of Science. Each of (...)
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  24. Philosophy of Religion (Unit 2).Elizabeth Burns - 2004 - In Elizabeth Burns & Stephen Law (eds.), Philosophy for AS and A2. Routledge.
  25. Daniel A. Dombrowski: Rethinking the Ontological Argument: A Neoclassical Theistic Response. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Burns - 2009 - Heythrop Journal 50 (4):719-721.
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