22 found
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Elizabeth Fenton [18]Elizabeth M. Fenton [4]
  1.  9
    Liberal Eugenics & Human Nature: Against Habermas.Elizabeth Fenton - 2006 - Hastings Center Report 36 (6):35-42.
    In the course of developing his arguments against making genetic enhancements to one's children, Habermas assumes that a clear line can be drawn between the natural and the manufactured. But given the current state of medical science, this is precisely what we can no longer take for granted.
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  2.  9
    Bioethics & Human Rights: Access to Health-Related Goods.John D. Arras & Elizabeth M. Fenton - 2009 - Hastings Center Report 39 (5):27-38.
    There are many good reasons for a merger between bioethics and human rights. First, though, significant philosophical groundwork must be done to clarify what a human right to health would be and—if we accept that it exists—exactly how it might influence the practical decisions we face about who gets what in very different contexts.
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  3.  8
    Dispensing with liberty: Conscientious refusal and the "morning-after pill".Elizabeth Fenton & Loren Lomasky - 2005 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (6):579 – 592.
    Citing grounds of conscience, pharmacists are increasingly refusing to fill prescriptions for emergency contraception, or the "morning-after pill." Whether correctly or not, these pharmacists believe that emergency contraception either constitutes the destruction of post-conception human life, or poses a significant risk of such destruction. We argue that the liberty of conscientious refusal grounds a strong moral claim, one that cannot be defeated solely by consideration of the interests of those seeking medication. We examine, and find lacking, five arguments for requiring (...)
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  4.  11
    Bioethics and Human Rights: Curb Your Enthusiasm.Elizabeth Fenton & John D. Arras - 2010 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (1):127.
    The call has been made for global bioethics. In an age of pandemics, international drug trials, and genetic technology, health has gone global, and bioethics must follow suit. George Annas is one among a number of thinkers to recommend that bioethics expand beyond its traditional domain of patient–physician interactions to encompass a broader range of health-related matters. Medicine, Annas argues, must “develop a global language and a global strategy that can help to improve the health of all of the world's (...)
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  5.  20
    Genetic Enhancement – a Threat to Human Rights?Elizabeth Fenton - 2008 - Bioethics 22 (1):1-7.
    Genetic enhancement is the modification of the human genome for the purpose of improving capacities or ‘adding in’ desired characteristics. Although this technology is still largely futuristic, debate over the moral issues it raises has been significant. George Annas has recently leveled a new attack against genetic enhancement, drawing on human rights as his primary weapon. I argue that Annas’ appeal to human rights ultimately falls flat, and so provides no good reason to object to genetic technology. Moreover, this argument (...)
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  6.  4
    Genetic enhancement – a threat to human rights?Elizabeth Fenton - 2007 - Bioethics 22 (1):1–7.
    ABSTRACT Genetic enhancement is the modification of the human genome for the purpose of improving capacities or ‘adding in’ desired characteristics. Although this technology is still largely futuristic, debate over the moral issues it raises has been significant. George Annas has recently leveled a new attack against genetic enhancement, drawing on human rights as his primary weapon. I argue that Annas’ appeal to human rights ultimately falls flat, and so provides no good reason to object to genetic technology. Moreover, this (...)
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  7.  16
    Conditions of Global Health Crisis Decision-Making—An Ethical Analysis.Elizabeth Fenton & Kata Chillag - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (3):395-402.
    The circumstances of a public health emergency shape reasoning and decision-making in ways that deviate from routine circumstances, where adherence to established values, principles, and methodologies is expected. Understanding what drives these deviations is critical to assessing their ethical consequences. In this paper we describe four conditions that influence decision-making during PHEs, in particular regarding the deployment and conduct of research on experimental or novel biomedical interventions. These four conditions are politicization, urgency, uncertainty, and fear. We argue that taken together (...)
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  8.  12
    Ethics Preparedness for Public Health Emergencies: Recommendations From the Presidential Bioethics Commission.Elizabeth Fenton, Kata Chillag & Nelson L. Michael - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (7):77-79.
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  9. Bioethics &.John D. Arras & Elizabeth M. Fenton - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
     
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  10.  4
    Equity and preventive regulations.Elizabeth Fenton - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (5):329-330.
    In ‘Obesity, equity and choice’, Timothy Wilkinson argues that preventive regulations to address obesity, such as taxes on sugary drinks, are at worst inequitable and at best fail to increase or improve equity. He concludes that we do not yet have good reasons to adopt them. I argue that equity considerations are not as problematic for preventive regulations as Wilkinson suggests.
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  11.  2
    Access to Health‐Related Goods.John D. Arras & Elizabeth M. Fenton - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 39 (5):27-38.
    There are many good reasons for a merger between bioethics and human rights. First, though, significant philosophical groundwork must be done to clarify what a human right to health would be and—if we accept that it exists—exactly how it might influence the practical decisions we face about who gets what in very different contexts.
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  12.  19
    Wrong Again—Rejoinder to Annas.Elizabeth Fenton & John D. Arras - 2010 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (1):141.
    It is clear from George Annas's response to our arguments that he has misunderstood and misrepresented our positions on several key points. We suspect that this may be due in part to significant differences between our respective agendas and points of view, so we begin this exchange with an exploration of these differences.
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  13.  7
    The precautionary principle in public health emergency regime: Ethical and legal examinations of Vietnamese and global response to COVID‐19.Hai Doan, Jing-Bao Nie & Elizabeth Fenton - 2023 - Bioethics 38 (1):11-23.
    Responses to the COVID-19 pandemic have been widely criticized for being too delayed and indecisive. As a result, the precautionary principle has been endorsed, applauded, and proposed to guide future responses to global public health emergencies. Drawing from controversial issues in response to COVID-19, especially in Vietnam, this paper critically discusses some key ethical and legal issues of employing the precautionary principle in public health emergencies. Engaging with discussions concerning this principle, especially in environmental law where the precautionary principle first (...)
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  14. Routledge Companion to Bioethics.John Arras, Rebecca Kukla & Elizabeth Fenton (eds.) - 2015 - New York, NY: Routledge.
    The Routledge Companion to Bioethics is a comprehensive reference guide to a wide range of contemporary concerns in bioethics. The volume orients the reader in a changing landscape shaped by globalization, health disparities, and rapidly advancing technologies. Bioethics has begun a turn toward a systematic concern with social justice, population health, and public policy. While also covering more traditional topics, this volume fully captures this recent shift and foreshadows the resulting developments in bioethics. It highlights emerging issues such as climate (...)
     
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  15. The Routledge Companion to Bioethics.John D. Arras, Elizabeth Fenton & Rebecca Kukla (eds.) - 2014 - New York, NY: Routledge.
    The Routledge Companion to Bioethics is a comprehensive reference guide to a wide range of contemporary concerns in bioethics. The volume orients the reader in a changing landscape shaped by globalization, health disparities, and rapidly advancing technologies. Bioethics has begun a turn toward a systematic concern with social justice, population health, and public policy. While also covering more traditional topics, this volume fully captures this recent shift and foreshadows the resulting developments in bioethics. It highlights emerging issues such as climate (...)
     
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  16.  2
    Conscience and Health.Elizabeth Fenton - 2013 - Ethical Perspectives 20 (1):132-143.
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  17.  8
    Arras and Fenton reply.John Arras & Elizabeth Fenton - 2010 - Hastings Center Report 40 (3):5-6.
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  18.  1
    Above the Decent Minimum: Problems of Justice for Two-Tiered Health Care.Elizabeth Fenton - 2015 - Jurisprudence 6 (1):125-130.
  19. Back to the future: Habermas's The Future of Human Nature-Reply.Elizabeth Fenton - 2007 - Hastings Center Report 37 (2):6-6.
     
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  20.  11
    Raymond G. de Vries is a professor at.Elizabeth M. Fenton, Kyle L. Galbraith, Susan Dorr Goold, Elisa J. Gordon, Lawrence O. Gostin, Hilde Lindemann, Anna C. Mastroianni, Mary Faith Marshall, Howard Minkoff & Joshua E. Perry - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
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  21.  7
    We want to help: ethical challenges of medical migration and brain waste during a pandemic.Elizabeth Fenton & Kata Chillag - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (9):607-610.
    Health worker shortages in many countries are reaching crisis levels, exacerbated by factors associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. In New Zealand, the medical specialists union has called for a health workforce emergency to be declared, yet at the same time, many foreign-trained healthcare workers are unable to stay in the country or unable to work. While their health systems differ, countries such as New Zealand, the USA and the UK at least partially rely on international medical graduates (IMGs) to ensure (...)
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  22.  93
    Why Tolerate Religion? by Brian Leiter, 2013 Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Pressxv + 187 pp, £16.95 (hb). [REVIEW]Elizabeth Fenton - 2013 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (3):283-285.
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