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Elizabeth Lanphier
Cincinnati Children's Hospital
  1.  9
    Trauma Informed Ethics Consultation.Elizabeth Lanphier & Uchenna E. Anani - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (5):45-57.
    We argue for the addition of trauma informed awareness, training, and skill in clinical ethics consultation by proposing a novel framework for Trauma Informed Ethics Consultation (TIEC). This approach expands on the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH) framework for, and key insights from feminist approaches to, ethics consultation, and the literature on trauma informed care (TIC). TIEC keeps ethics consultation in line with the provision of TIC in other clinical settings. Most crucially, TIEC (like TIC) is systematically sensitive (...)
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  2.  11
    Complicit Care: Health Care in Community.Elizabeth Lanphier - 2019 - Dissertation, Vanderbilt University
    We intuitively think and talk about health care as a human right. Moreover, we tend to talk about health in the language of basic rights or human rights without a clear sense of what such rights mean, let alone whose duty it is to fulfill them. Additionally, in the care ethics literature, we tend to think of a dividing line between care and justice. In this dissertation I aim to draw care and justice together in what I call care justice. (...)
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  3.  21
    A Problem of Self-Ownership for Reproductive Justice.Elizabeth Lanphier - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (2):312-327.
    This paper raises three concerns regarding self-ownership rhetoric to describe autonomy within healthcare in general and reproductive justice in specific. First, private property and the notion of “ownership” embedded in “self-ownership,” rely on and replicate historical injustices related to the initial acquisition of property. Second, not all individuals are recognized as selves with equal access to self-ownership. Third, self-ownership only justifies negative liberties. To fully protect healthcare access and reproductive care in specific, we must also be able to make claims (...)
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  4.  14
    Rights Don’T Stand Alone: Responsibility for Rights in a Pandemic.Takunda Matose & Elizabeth Lanphier - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (7):169-172.
    Volume 20, Issue 7, July 2020, Page 169-172.
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  5.  19
    Narrative Ethics and Intersectionality.Elizabeth Lanphier & Uchenna Anani - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (2):29-31.
    This paper responds to a proposal for an intersectional approach to the clinical encounter between patient and medical provider. We agree that an intersectional framework offers new insights and information in the clinical encounter. Intersectionality involves awareness of the physician-patient dynamic, and understanding the various privileges and disadvantages of all parties involved, at a micro and macroscopic level. Yet, this analysis alone is insufficient to aid in the clinical encounter and risks harm. We worry about a clinician making assumptions about (...)
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  6.  7
    Trading Cultural Competency for Trauma Informed Care.Uchenna Anani, Elizabeth Lanphier & Dalia Feltman - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (9):13-16.
    Berger and Miller argue that cultural competency as an educational tool for physicians-in-training fails to address structural inequality and systemic oppression. Instead, it focuses on “cul...
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  7.  11
    Ethical Home.Elizabeth Lanphier - 2020 - Social Philosophy Today 36:105-124.
    I argue for a conception of moral community as “ethical home,” in which home is a hybrid public and private concept, cohered through members’ complicit participation in the formation and endorsement of the community’s values and practices. In this essay I present and defend three premises that comprise my argument for this conception of moral community as an ethical home. First, I make a case for why “home” is an apt conception of moral community, defining the features of home relevant (...)
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  8.  11
    The Moral Weight of Preferences: Death, Sex, and Dementia.Elizabeth Lanphier & Shannon Fyfe - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (8):76-78.
    Volume 20, Issue 8, August 2020, Page 76-78.
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  9.  7
    The Strawman at the Pox Party.Elizabeth Lanphier & Kelly W. Harris - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (9):73-75.
    Volume 20, Issue 9, September 2020, Page 73-75.
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  10. An Institutional Ethic of Care.Elizabeth Lanphier - 2021 - In Elizabeth Victor & Laura K. Guidry-Grimes (eds.), Applying Nonideal Theory to Bioethics: Living and Dying in a Nonideal World. Springer. pp. 169-193.
    Care ethics has a curious relationship to justice. Care theorists alternately portray justice as separate from yet at times intersecting with, parallel and distinct from, or falling within yet secondary to care. Theories of justice tend to imagine an ideal world, and reason about justice from an imagined universal position. Care ethics, on the other hand, respond to a philosophical history in which abstract universal reasoning occludes the particular needs and contributions of marginalized or oppressed groups. I argue that care (...)
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  11.  5
    Trust, Transparency, and Trauma Informed Care.Elizabeth Lanphier - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (5):38-40.
    Not only is deception commonplace in medical encounters, according to Christopher Meyers (2021), but the clinical ethicist might have moral obligations to support and even enact deception. Descriptively Meyers is right that there are “opportunistic, self-interested and benevolent reasons” for deception through omission and commission in clinical medicine. But it is possible to retain this premise while rejecting the normative conclusion that the clinical ethicist “should sometimes be an active participant in the deception of patients and families.” One reason to (...)
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  12.  5
    Aporia of the Gift: Precision Medicine’s Obligations Without Expectations.Elizabeth Lanphier - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (4):83-85.
    In “Obligations of the Gift” Sandra Lee (2021) suggests that social norms of reciprocity and the expectations and obligations associated with gift-giving afford a framework for addressing social justice considerations in precision medicine. Lee is particularly concerned with obligations to marginalized or oppressed racial and ethnic groups, which are also historically under-represented populations in precision medicine. Obligations arise, Lee argues, through the “gift” that research participants make when they contribute their data or biospecimens to precision medicine research. This conceptualization of (...)
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  13.  4
    Age—Not Sex or Gender—Makes the Case of Ellie Anderson Complex.Elizabeth Lanphier & Shannon Fyfe - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (4):266-267.
    In ‘The Complex Case of Ellie Anderson’, Joona Rasanen and Anna Smajdor raise several ethical questions about the case. One question asks, but does not answer, whether Ellie faced discrimination for being transgender when her mother was not allowed access to Ellie’s sperm following her death. In raising the question, the authors imply anti-trans bias may have influenced this determination. However, this inference is not supported by current ethical and legal guidance for posthumous use of gametes, with which Ellie’s case (...)
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  14.  14
    Narrative and Medicine: Premises, Practices, Pragmatism.Elizabeth Lanphier - 2021 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 64 (2):211-234.
    Narrative is now a commonly used term in medical education, ethics, and practice. Yet the concept of narrative defies singular definition, and definitional and functional pluralism about narrative in health care remains underappreciated. Diverse conceptualizations of narrative are generically grouped under umbrella terms like “medical humanities” or “narrative medicine.” Such broad grouping risks undermining attention to relevant differences in use, meaning, or theory of narrative, overestimating the scope of certain criticisms of narrative practice or use, while overlooking more insidious concerns. (...)
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  15.  5
    Pediatric Off‐Label Use of Covid‐19 Vaccines: Ethical and Legal Considerations.Elizabeth Lanphier & Shannon Fyfe - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (6):27-32.
    Can Covid-19 vaccines be used off-label? Should they be? These were questions on the minds of parents, pediatricians, and the media when the FDA fully approved the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine for people aged 16 and up. Yet the American Academy of Pediatrics cautioned against pediatric off-label use of the vaccine, and the CDC Covid-19 Vaccine Provider Agreement appears to prohibit it. After briefly contextualizing ethical and legal precedents regarding off-label use, we offer an analysis of the ethical permissibility of and (...)
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  16.  16
    Thinking About Thought Experiments in Ethics.Elizabeth Lanphier & Amy McKiernan - 2019 - Teaching Ethics 19 (1):17-34.
    In this paper, we propose some ways in which teaching thought experiments in an ethics classroom may result in marginalizing or excluding students underrepresented in philosophy. Although thought experiments are designed to strip away details and pump intuitions, we argue that they may reinforce assumptions and stereotypes. As examples, we discuss several well-known thought experiments that may typically be included in undergraduate ethics courses, such as Bernard Williams’s Gauguin and Derek Parfit’s The Young Girl’s Child. We analyze the potential value (...)
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  17. Supporting Marginalized Decision-Maker’s Autonomy.Armand H. Matheny Antommaria & Elizabeth Lanphier - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (6):22-24.
    Amy E. Caruso Brown considers situations in which a minor child’s parent or legal guardian ”) defers to another individual (the “primary decision-maker...
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  18.  3
    Friends and Citizens in Plato’s Crito.Elizabeth Lanphier - 2021 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 27 (1):44-67.
    I propose a revisionary reading of Plato’s Crito focusing on the dramatic rendering of the friendship between Crito and Socrates, which I argue affords a model for political participation in a social contract. Their friendship models how citizens can come to be conventionally related to one another, and how they should treat one another internal to that relationship. This approach is apt for contemporary democratic theory, perhaps more so than standard interpretations of the political theory traditionally mined from the text, (...)
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  19.  1
    Physician Outreach During a Pandemic: Shared or Collective Responsibility?Elizabeth Lanphier - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (7):495-496.
    In ‘Ethics of sharing medical knowledge with the community: is the physician responsible for medical outreach during a pandemic?’ Strous and Karni note that the revised physician’s pledge in the World Medical Association Declaration of Geneva obligates individual physicians to share medical knowledge, which they interpret to mean a requirement to share knowledge publicly and through outreach. In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, Strous and Karni defend a form of medical paternalism insofar as the individual physician must reach out (...)
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  20.  1
    Public Trust and Medical Ethics.Elizabeth Lanphier - 2022 - Hastings Center Report 52 (2):58-59.
    Hastings Center Report, Volume 52, Issue 2, Page 58-59, March‐April 2022.
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  21.  2
    Breaking Down Communication: Narrative Medicine and its Distinctions.Elizabeth Lanphier - 2021 - Social Philosophy Today 37:197-205.
    In “Communication Breakdown: Probing the Limits of Narrative Medicine and its Discontents”, David J. Leichter engages practical experience teaching medical ethics in the college classroom to explore opportunities—and limits—of narrative engagement within medical ethics and clinical practice. Leichter raises concerns regarding potential epistemic harms, both testimonial and hermeneutical, when individuals, or their pain, cannot be adequately recognized through expressive modes traditionally understood as “narrative.” While I largely agree with Leichter’s worries about narrative authority and limits, I challenge his characterization of (...)
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