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Elizabeth S. Radcliffe [51]Elizabeth Schmidt Radcliffe [4]
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  1.  43
    Hume, Passion, and Action.Elizabeth Schmidt Radcliffe - 2018 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    David Hume’s theory of action is well known for several provocative theses, including that passion and reason cannot be opposed over the direction of action. In Hume, Passion, and Action, the author defends an original interpretation of Hume’s views on passion, reason and motivation that is consistent with other theses in Hume’s philosophy, loyal to his texts, and historically situated. This book challenges the now orthodox interpretation of Hume on motivation, presenting an alternative that situates Hume closer to “Humeans” than (...)
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  2. Moral Internalism and Moral Cognitivism in Hume’s Metaethics.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2006 - Synthese 152 (3):353 - 370.
    Most naturalists think that the belief/desire model from Hume is the best framework for making sense of motivation. As Smith has argued, given that the cognitive state (belief) and the conative state (desire) are separate on this model, if a moral judgment is cognitive, it could not also be motivating by itself. So, it looks as though Hume and Humeans cannot hold that moral judgments are states of belief (moral cognitivism) and internally motivating (moral internalism). My chief claim is that (...)
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  3.  54
    Hume's Psychology of the Passions: The Literature and Future Directions.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2015 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 53 (4):565-605.
    in a recent article entitled “Hume on the Passions,” Stephen Buckle opens with the claim that Hume’s theory of the passions has largely been neglected. “Apart from a couple of famous sections in the Treatise concerning the sources of action,” he writes, “the subject matter has rarely excited interest.”1 His analysis of why the subject of the passions in Hume has been uninspiring points to the fact that readers have largely misunderstood the point of Hume’s theory. They usually regard the (...)
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  4. Hume on the Generation of Motives: Why Beliefs Alone Never Motivate.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 1999 - Hume Studies 25 (1-2):101-122.
    Hume’s thesis that reason alone does not motivate is taken as the ground for this theory: Reason produces beliefs only, and beliefs are mere representations of fact, which, without passions for the objects the beliefs concern, cannot move anyone at all. Discussions of the Humean theory of motivation usually begin with the motivating passions in place without asking about their genesis. This emphasis, I think, overlooks a good deal of what Hume’s thesis concerning the motivational impotence of reason is about: (...)
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  5. Hume on Motivating Sentiments, the General Point of View, and the Inculcation of "Morality".Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 1994 - Hume Studies 20 (1):37-58.
    That Hume 's theory can be interpreted in two widely divergent ways-as a version of sentimentalism and as an ideal observer theory-is symptomatic of a puzzle ensconced in Hume 's theory. How can the ground of morality be internal and motivating when an inference to the feelings of a spectator in "the general point of view" is typically necessary to get to genuine moral distinctions? This paper considers and rejects the suggestion that in moral education, for Hume, the inculcation of (...)
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  6.  88
    How Does the Humean Sense of Duty Motivate?Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 1996 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (3):383-407.
    On Hume's account, when we lack virtues that would typically prompt moral action, we can instead be motivated by the "sense of duty." Surprisingly, Hume seems to maintain that, in such cases, we are motivated by a desire to avoid the unpleasantness of "self-hatred" evoked in us when we realize we lack certain traits others possess. This account has led commentators to argue that Hume is not a moral internalist, since motivation by duty is motivation by a self-interested desire. This (...)
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  7.  56
    Reasons From The Humean Perspective.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2012 - Philosophical Quarterly 62 (249):777-796.
    Humeans about practical reasoning have tried to explain how some of our desires are reason‐giving and some are not. On one account, we act from reasons only when we act on desires that cohere in a consistent set. On another account, we act on reasons only when we act on desires that do not undermine our values. Both accounts are problematic. First, the notion of a consistent set of desires is vague and introduces a criterion not necessarily rooted in the (...)
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  8.  50
    A Companion to Hume.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (ed.) - 2008 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    Comprised of twenty-nine specially commissioned essays, _A Companion to Hume_ examines the depth of the philosophies and influence of one of history's most remarkable thinkers. Demonstrates the range of Hume's work and illuminates the ongoing debates that it has generated Organized by subject, with introductions to each section to orient the reader Explores topics such as knowledge, passion, morality, religion, economics, and politics Examines the paradoxes of Hume's thought and his legacy, covering the methods, themes, and consequences of his contributions (...)
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  9.  87
    Kantian Tunes on a Humean Instrument: Why Hume Is Not Really a Skeptic About Practical Reasoning.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 1997 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 27 (2):247 -.
    The theory that practical reasoning is wholly instrumental says that the only practical function of reason is to tell agents the means to their ends, while their ends are fixed by something other than reason itself. In this essay I argue that Hume has an instrumentalist theory of practical reasoning. This thesis may sound as unexciting as the contention that Kant is a rationalist about morality. For who would have thought otherwise? After all, isn't the ‘instrumentalist’ line in contemporary discussions (...)
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  10.  51
    Love and Benevolence in Hutcheson's and Hume's Theories of the Passions.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2004 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (4):631 – 653.
  11.  8
    Review of David Fate Norton (Ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Hume. [REVIEW]Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 1995 - Philosophical Review 104 (2):275-77.
  12.  36
    Hume’s Better Argument for Motivational Skepticism.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe & Richard McCarty - 2018 - Philosophical Explorations 21 (1):76-89.
    On a standard interpretation, Hume argued that reason is not practical, because its operations are limited to “demonstration” and “probability.” But recent critics claim that by limiting reason’s operations to only these two, his argument begs the question. Despite this, a better argument for motivational skepticism can be found in Hume’s text, one that emphasizes reason’s inability to generate motive force against contrary desires or passions. Nothing can oppose an impulse but a contrary impulse, Hume believed, and reason cannot generate (...)
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  13.  72
    The Inertness of Reason and Hume’s Legacy.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2012 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 42 (S1):117-133.
    Hume argues against the seventeenth-century rationalists that reason is impotent to motivate action and to originate morality. Hume's arguments have standardly been considered the foundation for the Humean theory of motivation in contemporary philosophy. The Humean theory alleges that beliefs require independent desires to motivate action. Recently, however, new commentaries allege that Hume's argument concerning the inertness of reason has no bearing on whether beliefs can motivate. These commentaries maintain that for Hume, beliefs about future pleasurable and painful objects on (...)
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  14. The Humean Theory of Motivation and its Critics.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2008 - In A Companion to Hume. Wiley-Blackwell.
  15. Reason, Morality, and Hume’s “Active Principles”: Comments on Rachel Cohon’s Hume’s Morality: Feeling and Fabrication.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2008 - Hume Studies 34 (2):267-276.
    Rachel Cohon's Hume is a moral sensing theorist, who holds both that moral qualities are mind-dependent and that there is such a thing as moral knowledge. He is an anti-rationalist about motivation, arguing that reason alone does not motivate, but allows that both beliefs and passions are motivating. And he is both a descriptive and a normative moral theorist who, despite having resources for putting checks on our sentimentally-based moral evaluations, does end up with a kind of a relativistic account (...)
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  16. Moral Naturalism and the Possibility of Making Ourselves Better.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2007 - In Brad Wilburn (ed.), Moral Cultivation. Lexington Books.
  17.  37
    Hutcheson's Perceptual and Moral Subjectivism.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 1986 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 3 (4):407 - 421.
  18.  3
    Editors' Introduction.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe & Mark G. Spencer - 2022 - Hume Studies 47 (1):7-8.
    This is our initial issue as co-editors of Hume Studies. We thank our predecessors, Ann Levey, Karl Schafer, and Amy M. Schmitter, for their years of editorial oversight and for their assistance in the transition. Some of the papers they began shepherding through the editorial process will be appearing in our issues.Regular readers of the journal will notice that volume 46 is dated 2020, while this first issue of volume 47 is dated April 2022. The journal has been behind the (...)
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  19. Review of Constantine Sandis, Character and Causation: Hume's Philosophy of Action. [REVIEW]Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2017 - Hume Studies 43 (1):139-42.
    This review offers an overview of Sandis's book and raises a few questions about it.
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  20.  44
    Moral Sentimentalism and the Reasonableness of Being Good.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2013 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 2013 (no. 263):9-27.
    In this paper, I discuss the implications of Hutcheson’s and Hume’s sentimentalist theories for the question of whether and how we can offer reasons to be moral. Hutcheson and Hume agree that reason does not give us ultimate ends. Because of this, on Hutcheson’s line, the possession of affections and of a moral sense makes practical reasons possible. On Hume’s view, that reason does not give us ultimate ends means that reason does not motivate on its own, and this makes (...)
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  21.  53
    Humean Nature: How Desires Explain Action, Thought, and Feeling, by Neil Sinhababu: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017, Pp. Ix + 214, £45. [REVIEW]Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2019 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 97 (1):212-212.
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  22.  22
    A Humean Explanation of Acting on Normative Reasons.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2020 - Synthese 199 (1-2):1269-1292.
    This article presents a limited defense of Humeanism about practical reason. Jonathan Dancy and other traditional objective-reasons theorists argue that all practical reasons, what we think about when we deliberate, are facts or states of affairs in the world. On the Humean view, the reasons that motivate us are belief-desire combinations, which are in the mind. Thus, Dancy and others reject Humeanism on the grounds that it cannot allow that anyone acts from a normative reason. I argue, first, that this (...)
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  23.  55
    Hume on Passion, Reason, and the Reasonableness of Ends.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 1994 - Southwest Philosophy Review 10 (2):1-11.
  24.  68
    Strength of Mind and the Calm and Violent Passions.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2015 - Res Philosophica 92 (3):1-21.
    Hume’s distinction between the calm and violent passions is one whose boundaries are not entirely clear. However, it is crucial to understanding his motivational theory and to identifying an unusual virtue he calls “strength of mind,” the motivational prevalence of the calm passions over the violent. In this paper, I investigate the boundaries of the calm passions and consider the constitution of strength of mind and why Hume regards it as an admirable trait. These are provocative issues for two reasons. (...)
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  25. Acali and Acid, Oil and Vinegar: Hume on Contrary Passions.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2017 - In Robert Stern & Alix Cohen (eds.), Thinking about the Emotions : A Philosophical History. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 150-171.
    In this paper, I present a close study of Hume’s treatment of contrary passions, asking questions about his description of the psychology of emotional difference and opposition. In treating this topic, I examine two opposed, but noteworthy, psychological functions that Hume imputes to human beings: sympathy and comparison. In brief, sympathy is the mechanism by which we share others’ feelings, and comparison is the function of our minds by which we find ourselves feeling passions opposed to others’ experiences. Sympathy can (...)
     
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  26.  18
    Ruly and Unruly Passions: Early Modern Perspectives.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85:21-38.
    A survey of theories on the passions and action in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Britain and western Europe reveals that few, if any, of the major writers held the view that reason in any of its functions executes action without a passion. Even rationalists, like Cambridge Platonist Ralph Cudworth and English clergyman Samuel Clarke, recognized the necessity of passion to action. On the other hand, many of these intellectuals also agreed with French philosophers Jean-François Senault, René Descartes, and Nicolas Malebranche that, (...)
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  27.  33
    Kenny’s Aquinas on Dispositions for Human Acts.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 1984 - New Scholasticism 58 (4):424-446.
  28.  59
    Ruling Passions.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2011 - The Philosophers' Magazine 54 (54):85-89.
    A radical implication of Hume’s theory of motivation is that it makes no sense, strictly speaking, to call actions rational or irrational. So, he claims, it is not contrary to reason for me to prefer the destruction of the world to getting a scratch on my finger.
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  29.  18
    How Hume Influenced Contemporary Moral Philosophy.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2018 - In Andrew Valls & Angela Coventry (eds.), David Hume on Morals, Politics, and Society. New Haven: Yale University Press. pp. 265-289.
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  30. Review of DANCY, J.-Practical Reality. [REVIEW]Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2002 - Philosophical Books 43 (4):312-312.
  31. Francis Hutcheson.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2002 - In Steven Nadler (ed.), A Companion to Early Modern Philosophy. Blackwell.
     
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  32. Francis Hutcheson's Moral Theory. [REVIEW]Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 1992 - Ethics 102:882.
     
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  33. Hutcheson's Contributions to Action Theory.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2022 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 20 (2):103-120.
    Jonathan Dancy charges that Hutcheson's distinction between justifying reasons and motivating reasons is unimportant: it is simply between moral reasons and other good reasons. I argue that the distinction is between propositions with different presuppositions and different functions. One identifies qualities of objects that we desire; the other identifies qualities that we approve. I situate Hutcheson in the current debate about the nature of practical reasons. I argue that he avoids problems posed for factivists and for Humeans. On Hutcheson's view, (...)
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  34. Hume on the Nature of Morality.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2022 - Cambridge University Press.
    David Hume's moral system involves considerations that seem at odds with one another. He insists on the reality of moral distinctions, while showing that they are founded on the human constitution. He notes the importance to morality of the consequences of actions, while emphasizing that motives are the subjects of moral judgments. He appeals to facts about human psychology as the basis for an argument that morality is founded, not on reason, but on sentiment. Yet, he insists that no “ought” (...)
     
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  35. Is Physicalism Near Enough? On Jaegwon Kim’s ‘Physicalism or Something Near Enough’.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2004 - In João Sàágua (ed.), A Explicação da Interpretação Humana/The Explanation of Human Interpretation. Edições Colibri. pp. 111-16.
  36. Late Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe, Richard McCarty, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Jayprakash Vaidya (eds.) - 2007 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    Part of the Blackwell Readings in the History of Philosophy series, this survey of late modern philosophy focuses on the key texts and philosophers of the period whose beliefs changed the course of western thought.
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  37.  32
    Moral and Scientific Realism: Essays in Honor of Richard N. Boyd and Nicholas L. Sturgeon (Philosophical Studies 172:4).Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (ed.) - 2015 - Springer Netherlands.
    Introduction to an issue on moral and scientific realism in honor of Richard N. Boyd and Nicholas L. Sturgeon (Elizabeth S. Radcliffe, guest editor).
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  38. On Hume.Elizabeth Schmidt Radcliffe - 2000 - Wadsworth.
    This brief text assists students in understanding Hume's philosophy and thinking so that they can more fully engage in useful, intelligent class dialogue and improve their understanding of course content. Part of the "Wadsworth Philosophers Series,", ON HUME is written by a philosopher deeply versed in the philosophy of this key thinker. Like other books in the series, this concise book offers sufficient insight into the thinking of a notable philosopher better enabling students to engage in the reading and to (...)
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  39. Philosophical Studies, Selected Papers From the Pacific Division American Philosophical Association Meeting 1999, 99:1.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (ed.) - 2000 - Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.
    A special issue of Philosophical Studies containing selected papers from the 1999 meeting of the Pacific Division American Philosophical Association (Elizabeth S. Radcliffe, guest editor).
     
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  40. Morality (Ethics).Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 1997 - In Edward Barbarell Don Garrett (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Empiricism (Greenwood Press). pp. 269-73.
     
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  41. Review of D.D. Raphael, Adam Smith (Oxford University Press, 1985). [REVIEW]Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 1987 - Philosophical Review:612-15.
     
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  42. The Nature of Morals Founded on the Human Fabric.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2021 - In Esther Kroeker & Willem Lemmens (eds.), Hume's Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals: A Critical Guide. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 13-32.
    In section 1 of An Enquiry concerning the Principles of Morals, Hume claims that those who deny the reality of morals are disingenuous. He also notes that philosophy has had a history of disagreements about whether morals originate in reason or in sentiment. Throughout his book, Hume applies an experimental method to find the “universal principles” from which morality is ultimately derived. Then, in Appendix 1, he then argues for the origin of these principles in sentiment or taste, a product (...)
     
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  43.  31
    The British Moralists and the Internal 'Ought': 1640-1740. [REVIEW]Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 1997 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (3):470-472.
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  44. Hume and the Passions as Original Existences.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2012 - In Lorenzo Greco & Alessio Vaccari (ed.), Hume Readings. Edizioni di Storia e Letteratura.
     
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  45. Passionate Regulation and the Practicality of Reason.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2018 - In Philip Reed & Rico Vitz (eds.), Hume’s Moral Philosophy and Contemporary Psychology. Routledge.
    The author presents a reading of Hume’s theory of passionate self-moderation and explore its application to the question of whether Hume accords any practicality to reason. One of Hume’s well-known arguments concludes that reason cannot exercise control over the passions, many of which cause or motivate action. So, it looks as though actions are inevitable results of unruly passions. Hume’s theory of action, however, embodies principles by which certain passions can moderate the effects of other passions. The goal in this (...)
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  46.  35
    Review of Michael B. Gill, The British Moralists on Human Nature and the Birth of Secular Ethics[REVIEW]Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2007 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (8).
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  47.  7
    Introduction, Moral and Scientific Realism: Essays in Honor of Richard N. Boyd and Nicholas L. Sturgeon.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (4):841-841.
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  48.  59
    Introduction.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2004 - Utilitas 16 (2):119-123.
  49.  19
    Hume's Theory of Moral Judgment: A Study in the Unity of A Treatise of Human Nature (Review). [REVIEW]Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 1994 - Hume Studies 19 (2):324-326.
  50.  21
    A Cultivated Reason: An Essay on Hume and Humeanism. [REVIEW]Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (3):443-446.
    The main aim of Christopher Williams’s book is to develop and advocate a Humean account of what it is to be a “reasonable” person. The project is motivated by the fact that Hume depicts reason paradoxically as both a source of skepticism and as a source of belief, as both enslaved to the passions and as important to establishing which passions are morally significant. In his preface, Williams tell us that genre matters to philosophy; how it matters, he says, “is (...)
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