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Elizabeth Scarbrough
Florida International University
  1. The Ruins of War.Elizabeth Scarbrough - 2020 - In Jeanette Bicknell, Jennifer Judkins & Carolyn Korsmeyer (eds.), Philosophical Perspectives on Ruins, Monuments, and Memorials. New York and London: pp. 228-240.
    Ruins are evocative structures, and we value them in different ways for the various things they mean to us. Ruins can be aesthetically appreciated, but they are also valued for their historical importance, what they symbolize to different cultures and communities, and as lucrative objects, i.e., for tourism. However, today an increasing number of ancient ruins have been damaged or completely destroyed by acts of war. In 2001 the Taliban struck a major blow to cultural heritage by blasting the Bamiyan (...)
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  2.  34
    Visiting the Ruins of Detroit: Exploitation or Cultural Tourism?Elizabeth Scarbrough - 2018 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (3):549-566.
    Are Detroit ruin tours a form of morally permissible cultural tourism, or do these tours amount to a form of exploitation? To answer this question I compare Detroit ruin tours with ‘slum tours’ – guided tours of slums in the world's major cities. I argue that exploitation of the sort we find in slum tourism also exists, to a lesser extent, in Detroit ruin tours. To show this I detail two different accounts of exploitation and argue that Ruth Sample's account (...)
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    What Makes Nature Beautiful?Elizabeth Scarbrough - 2021 - Introduction to Philosophy: Aesthetic Theory and Practice. Introduction to Philosophy: Aesthetic Theory and Practice.
    I present a brief overview of different theories of the beauty of nature. I will start by discussing two historical accounts that I believe have most impacted our current conception of the beauty in nature: the picturesque and the sublime. I then turn to a discussion of contemporary accounts of the beauty of nature, dividing these accounts into conceptual accounts, non-conceptual accounts, and hybrid accounts of nature appreciation. What I hope to show is that there is no one-principle-fits-all solution for (...)
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    Unimagined Beauty.Elizabeth Scarbrough - 2014 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (4):445-449.
    Ghost, lost, and ruinated things are important but under-theorized objects of aesthetic appreciation. Both Jeanette Bicknell and Jennifer Judkins rely on “imaginative reconstruction” to explain the aesthetic interest in experiencing these places. This paper presents three critical reflections on Bicknell’s and Judkins’ accounts. First, I argue that it is unnecessary to know or value what is missing to appreciate what remains. Second, Bicknell and Judkins overemphasize the importance of imaginative reconstruction to our aesthetic engagement with these structures. Third, they do (...)
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  5. Ruminations on Ruinations.Elizabeth Scarbrough - 2018 - The Philosophers' Magazine 81:62-67.
    We can see ruins as objects that have a foot in three different times: the past, the present, and the future. This is the nature of the ruin: they help us imagine the past, affords us interesting aesthetic opportunities in the present, and asks us to project ourselves (and it) into the future. We think about those who once lived, our own current experience, and what will be. There are two kinds of aesthetic experiences of ruins that are often conflated: (...)
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  6.  57
    What to Do with Dead Monuments.Elizabeth Scarbrough - 2020 - The Philosophers' Magazine 91:26-32.
    I propose that removed statues be placed in a monument graveyard. This would transfigure a monument, whose purpose is to honour a person or evoke a “glorious past,” into a memorial, whose purpose is to help us grieve. Thus, we dethrone the man who committed violent racists acts, like Edward Colson, and place the statue’s corpse in a graveyard. This repurposing will give old monuments new meanings more in line with our contemporary values.
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    Things: In Touch with the Past. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Scarbrough - 2019 - British Journal of Aesthetics 59 (4):488-491.
    Things: In Touch with the PastKorsmeyerCarolynOUP. 2019. PP. 224. £32.99.
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  8. Are Archaeological Parks the New Amusement Parks? UNESCO World Heritage Status and Tourism.Elizabeth Scarbrough - 2021 - In Sean Allen-Hermanson Anton Killin (ed.), Explorations in Archaeology and Philosophy. Synthese Library (Studies in Epistemology, Logic, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science).
    In this chapter I address the concern that UNESCO World Heritage designation leads to unregulated tourism. I argue that heritage tourism not only has a negative impact on the site but may adversely impact local populations and descendant communities. I detail two related worries, UNESCO-cide and the Disneyfication of cultural heritage. The term ‘UNESCO-cide’ was coined by Marco d’Eramo to describe the role overtourism has played in the death of cities listed on UNESCO’s World Heritage list. Disneyfication is the process (...)
     
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    MCMAHON, JENNIFER A., Ed. Social Aesthetics and Moral Judgment: Pleasure, Reflection and Accountability. Abingdon, UK: Routledge, 2018, 230 Pp., 10 B&W and 5 Color Illus., $140.00 Cloth. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Scarbrough - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 77 (3):336-339.
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    Are Archaeological Parks the New Amusement Parks? UNESCO World Heritage Status and Tourism.Elizabeth Scarbrough - 2021 - In Sean Allen-Hermanson Anton Killin (ed.), Explorations in Archaeology and Philosophy. Synthese Library. Springer Verlag. pp. 235-261.
    In this chapter I address the concern that UNESCO World Heritage designation leads to unregulated tourism. I argue that heritage tourism not only has a negative impact on the site but may adversely impact local populations and descendant communities. I detail two related worries, UNESCO-cide and the Disneyfication of cultural heritage. The term ‘UNESCO-cide’ was coined by Marco d’Eramo to describe the role overtourism has played in the death of cities listed on UNESCO’s World Heritage list. Disneyfication is the process (...)
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    Beauty Unlimited - Review. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Scarbrough - 2014 - Hypatia Reviews Online 1.
    Peg Zeglin Brand (editor) Beauty Unlimited BLOOMINGTON AND INDIANAPOLIS: INDIANA UNIVERSITY PRESS, 2013 (ISBN 987-0-253-00642-4 ) Reviewed by Elizabeth Scarbrough, 2014 Narrated by Miranda Pilipchuk.
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