Results for 'Elizabeth Tolbert'

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  1.  14
    Theorizing the musically abject.Elizabeth Tolbert - 2004 - In Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno (eds.), Bad music: the music we love to hate. New York: Routledge. pp. 104.
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  2.  11
    An ethnomusicological perspective on animal 'music'and human music: the paradox of 'the paradox of rhythm'.Elizabeth Tolbert - 2011 - In Patrick Rebuschat, Martin Rohrmeier, John A. Hawkins & Ian Cross (eds.), Language and Music as Cognitive Systems. Oxford University Press. pp. 121.
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  3. Music and meaning.Ian Cross & Tolbert & Elizabeth - 2008 - In Susan Hallam, Ian Cross & Michael Thaut (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Music Psychology. Oxford University Press.
     
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  4. Space, time, and perversion: essays on the politics of bodies.Elizabeth A. Grosz - 1995 - New York: Routledge.
    Marking a ground-breaking moment in the debate surrounding bodies and "body politics," Elizabeth Grosz's Space, Time and Perversion contends that only by resituating and rethinking the body will feminism and cultural analysis effect and unsettle the knowledges, disciplines and institutions which have controlled, regulated and managed the body both ideologically and materially. Exploring the fields of architecture, philosophy, and--in a controversial way--queer theory, Grosz shows how these fields have conceptually stripped bodies of their specificity, their corporeality, and the vestigal (...)
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  5. The Dynamics of Social Practice: Everyday Life and How It Changes.Elizabeth Shove - 2012 - Sage Publications. Edited by Mika Pantzar & Matt Watson.
    The Dynamics of Social Practice -- Introducing Theories of Practice -- Materials and Resources -- Sequence and Structure -- Making and Breaking Links -- Material, Competence and Meaning -- Car-Driving: Elements and Linkages Making Links -- Breaking Links -- Elements Between Practices -- Standardization and Diversity -- Individual and Collective Careers -- The Life of Elements -- Modes of Circulation -- Transportation and Access: Material -- Abstraction, Reversal and Migration: Competence -- Association and Classification: Meaning -- Packing and Unpacking -- (...)
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  6.  41
    Chaos, Territory, Art: Deleuze and the Framing of the Earth.Elizabeth Grosz - 2008 - Columbia University Press.
    Instead of treating art as a unique creation that requires reason and refined taste to appreciate, Elizabeth Grosz argues that art-especially architecture, music, and painting-is born from the disruptive forces of sexual selection. She approaches art as a form of erotic expression connecting sensory richness with primal desire, and in doing so, finds that the meaning of art comes from the intensities and sensations it inspires, not just its intention and aesthetic. By regarding our most cultured human accomplishments as (...)
  7. Can Atheists Have Faith?Elizabeth Jackson - forthcoming - Philosophic Exchange.
    This paper examines whether atheists, who believe that God does not exist, can have faith. Of course, atheists have certain kinds of faith: faith in their friends, faith in certain ideals, and faith in themselves. However, the question we’ll examine is whether atheists can have theistic faith: faith that God exists. Philosophers tend to fall on one of two extremes on this question: some, like Dan Howard-Snyder (2019) and Imran Aijaz (2023), say unequivocally no; others, like Robert Whitaker (2019) and (...)
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  8. Permissivist Evidentialism.Elizabeth Jackson - forthcoming - In Scott Stapleford, Kevin McCain & Matthias Steup (eds.), Evidentialism at 40: New Arguments, New Angles. Routledge.
    Many evidentialists are impermissivists. But there’s no in-principle reason for this. In this paper, I examine and motivate permissivist evidentialism. Not only are permissivism and evidentialism compatible but there are unique benefits that arise for this combination of views. In particular, permissivist evidentialism respects the importance of evidence while capturing its limitations and provides a plausible and attractive explanation of the relationship between the epistemic and non-epistemic. Permissivist evidentialism is thus an attractive option in logical space that hasn’t received enough (...)
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  9. Empathy, Motivating Reasons, and Morally Worthy Action.Elizabeth Ventham - forthcoming - Journal of Value Inquiry:1-13.
    Contemporary literature criticises a necessary link between empathy and actions that demonstrate genuine moral worth. If there is such a necessary link, many argue, it must come in the developmental stages of our moral capacities, rather than being found in the mental states that make up our motivating reasons. This paper goes against that trend, arguing that critics have not considered how wide-ranging the mental states are that make up a person’s reasons. In particular, it argues that empathy can play (...)
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  10. Direct Brain Interventions and Responsibility Enhancement.Elizabeth Shaw - 2014 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 8 (1):1-20.
    Advances in neuroscience might make it possible to develop techniques for directly altering offenders’ brains, in order to make offenders more responsible and law-abiding. The idea of using such techniques within the criminal justice system can seem intuitively troubling, even if they were more effective in preventing crime than traditional methods of rehabilitation. One standard argument against this use of brain interventions is that it would undermine the individual’s free will. This paper maintains that ‘free will’ (at least, as that (...)
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  11.  90
    The Right to Bodily Integrity and the Rehabilitation of Offenders Through Medical Interventions: A Reply to Thomas Douglas.Elizabeth Shaw - 2016 - Neuroethics 12 (1):97-106.
    Medical interventions such as methadone treatment for drug addicts or “chemical castration” for sex offenders have been used in several jurisdictions alongside or as an alternative to traditional punishments, such as incarceration. As our understanding of the biological basis for human behaviour develops, our criminal justice system may make increasing use of such medical techniques and may become less reliant on incarceration. Academic debate on this topic has largely focused on whether offenders can validly consent to medical interventions, given the (...)
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  12. Applied Ethics: An Impartial Introduction.Elizabeth Jackson, Tyron Goldschmidt, Dustin Crummett & Rebecca Chan - 2021 - Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Publishing. Edited by Tyron Goldschmidt, Dustin Crummett & Rebecca Chan.
    This book is devoted to applied ethics. We focus on six popular and controversial topics: abortion, the environment, animals, poverty, punishment, and disability. We cover three chapters per topic, and each chapter is devoted to a famous or influential argument on the topic. After we present an influential argument, we then consider objections to the argument, and replies to the objections. The book is impartial, and set up in order to equip the reader to make up her own mind about (...)
  13. The Cognitive Science of Credence.Elizabeth Jackson - forthcoming - In Neil Van Leeuwen & Tania Lombrozo (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of the Cognitive Science of Belief. Oxford University Press: Oxford.
    Credences are similar to levels of confidence, represented as a value on the [0,1] interval. This chapter sheds light on questions about credence, including its relationship to full belief, with an eye toward the empirical relevance of credence. First, I’ll provide a brief epistemological history of credence and lay out some of the main theories of the nature of credence. Then, I’ll provide an overview of the main views on how credences relate to full beliefs. Finally, I’ll turn to the (...)
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  14. Norms, Constitutive and Social, and Assertion.Elizabeth Fricker - 2017 - American Philosophical Quarterly 54 (4):397-418.
    I define a social norm as a regularity in behavior whose persistence is causally explained by the existence of sanctioning attitudes of participants toward violations—without these sanctions, individuals have motive to violate the norm. I show how a universal precept "When in circumstances S, do action F" can be sustained by the conditional preference of each to conform, given that others do, of a convention, and also reinforced by the sanctions of a norm. I observe that a precept with moral (...)
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  15.  12
    Architecture from the Outside: Essays on Virtual and Real Space.Elizabeth Grosz - 2001 - MIT Press.
    Essays at the intersection of philosophy and architecture explore how we understand and inhabit space. To be outside allows one a fresh perspective on the inside. In these essays, philosopher Elizabeth Grosz explores the ways in which two disciplines that are fundamentally outside each another—architecture and philosophy—can meet in a third space to interact free of their internal constraints. "Outside" also refers to those whose voices are not usually heard in architectural discourse but who inhabit its space—the destitute, the (...)
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  16.  53
    Why We Disagree About Human Nature.Elizabeth Hannon & Tim Lewens (eds.) - 2018 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Is human nature something that the natural and social sciences aim to describe, or is it a pernicious fiction? What role, if any, does ”human nature’ play in directing and informing scientific work? Can we talk about human nature without invoking---either implicitly or explicitly---a contrast with human culture? It might be tempting to think that the respectability of ”human nature’ is an issue that divides natural and social scientists along disciplinary boundaries, but the truth is more complex. The contributors to (...)
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  17.  25
    Countable entities: Developmental changes.Elizabeth F. Shipley & Barbara Shepperson - 1990 - Cognition 34 (2):109-136.
  18. The Formal and Real Subsumption of Gender Relations.Elizabeth Portella & Larry Alan Busk - forthcoming - Historical Materialism.
    Attempts to unify Marxist and feminist social critique have been vexed by the fact that ‘patriarchy’ predates the advent of capitalism (its transhistorical status). Feminists within the Marxist, socialist, and materialist traditions have responded to this point by either granting patriarchy a certain autonomy relative to capitalism (the ‘dual/triple systems’ approach), or by suggesting that patriarchal relations have a foundational and necessary status in the history of capitalist development (which we term the ‘origins-subsistence’ approach). This paper offers an alternative account (...)
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  19.  25
    In Defence of Principlism in AI Ethics and Governance.Elizabeth Seger - 2022 - Philosophy and Technology 35 (2):1-7.
    It is widely acknowledged that high-level AI principles are difficult to translate into practices via explicit rules and design guidelines. Consequently, many AI research and development groups that claim to adopt ethics principles have been accused of unwarranted “ethics washing”. Accordingly, there remains a question as to if and how high-level principles should be expected to influence the development of safe and beneficial AI. In this short commentary I discuss two roles high-level principles might play in AI ethics and governance. (...)
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  20.  18
    The Role of Risk Climate and Ethical Self-interest Climate in Predicting Unethical Pro-organisational Behaviour.Elizabeth Sheedy, Patrick Garcia & Denise Jepsen - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (2):281-300.
    Unethical pro-organisational behaviour is an ongoing concern, prompting the need for more nuanced understanding of the workplace environment most likely to inhibit it. This study considers the role of risk climate, sometimes referred to as risk culture, as well as ethical climate, for reducing UPB. The study investigates whether four risk climate factors can, by focusing on the long-term consequences of UPB to the organisation, and providing guidance on behavioural norms, reduce UPB misconduct. Surveying employees in three financial institutions we (...)
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  21. A Dilemma for Conferralism.Elizabeth VanKammen & Michael Rea - forthcoming - Analysis.
    Conferralism is the view that social properties are neither intrinsic to the things that have them nor possessed simply by virtue of their causal or spatiotemporal relations to other things, but are somehow bestowed (intentionally or not, explicitly or not) upon them by persons who have both the capacity and the standing to bestow them. We argue that conferralism faces a dilemma: either it is viciously circular, or it is limited in scope in a way that undercuts its motivation.
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  22. What to Do with Dead Monuments.Elizabeth Scarbrough - 2020 - The Philosophers' Magazine 91:26-32.
    I propose that removed statues be placed in a monument graveyard. This would transfigure a monument, whose purpose is to honour a person or evoke a “glorious past,” into a memorial, whose purpose is to help us grieve. Thus, we dethrone the man who committed violent racists acts, like Edward Colson, and place the statue’s corpse in a graveyard. This repurposing will give old monuments new meanings more in line with our contemporary values.
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  23. The trouble with being earnest: Deliberative democracy and the sincerity Norm.Elizabeth Markovits - 2006 - Journal of Political Philosophy 14 (3):249–269.
    This paper examines the idea that straight talk can actually pose certain dangers for democracy by asking two interrelated questions. First, does our belief in the importance of sincerity necessarily improve political deliberation? Second, does our belief cause us to under-appreciate other important communicative resources? We will see that much hinges on our answers to these questions because they deal directly with whose voices are to be considered legitimate and authoritative in our public sphere. This paper begins from a deliberative (...)
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  24. The Subject in Neuropsychology: Individuating Minds in the Split‐Brain Case.Elizabeth Schechter - 2015 - Mind and Language 30 (5):501-525.
    Many experimental findings with split-brain subjects intuitively suggest that each such subject has two minds. The conceptual and empirical basis of this duality intuition has never been fully articulated. This article fills that gap, by offering a reconstruction of early neuropsychological literature on the split-brain phenomenon. According to that work, the hemispheres operate independently of each other insofar as they interact via the mediation of effection and transduction—via behavior and sensation, essentially. This is how your mind and my mind interact (...)
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  25.  6
    Expanding The Scope of The Epistemic Argument to Cover Nonpunitive Incapacitation.Elizabeth Shaw - 2024 - Diametros 21 (79):132-145.
    A growing number of theorists have launched an epistemic challenge against retributive punishment. This challenge involves the core claim that it is wrong (intentionally) to inflict serious harm on someone unless the moral argument for doing so has been established to a high standard of credibility. Proponents of this challenge typically argue that retributivism fails to meet the required epistemic standard, because retributivism relies on a contentious conception of free will, about whose existence we cannot be sufficiently certain. However, the (...)
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  26.  31
    Retributivism and the Moral Enhancement of Criminals Through Brain Interventions.Elizabeth Shaw - 2018 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 83:251-270.
    This chapter will focus on the biomedical moral enhancement of offenders – the idea that we could modify offenders’ brains in order to reduce the likelihood that they would engage in immoral, criminal behaviour. Discussions of the permissibility of using biomedical means to address criminal behaviour typically analyse the issues from the perspective of medical ethics, rather than penal theory. However, recently certain theorists have discussed whether brain interventions could be legitimately used for punitive (as opposed to purely therapeutic) purposes. (...)
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  27.  27
    The influence of positive mood on different aspects of cognitive control.Elizabeth A. Martin & John G. Kerns - 2011 - Cognition and Emotion 25 (2):265-279.
  28. Two Unities of Consciousness.Elizabeth Schechter - 2010 - European Journal of Philosophy 21 (2):197-218.
    : This paper argues for a distinction between possession of a unified consciousness and possession of a single stream of consciousness. Although the distinction has widespread applicability in discussions of the structure of consciousness and of pathologies of conscious experience, I will illustrate its importance primarily using the debate about consciousness in split-brain subjects, suggesting that those who have argued that split-brain subjects have two streams of consciousness apiece and those who have argued that they have a unified consciousness may (...)
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  29.  64
    Organizational Moral Values.Elizabeth D. Scott - 2002 - Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (1):33-55.
    Abstract:This article argues that the important organizational values to study are organizational moral values. It identifies five moral values (honest communication, respect for property, respect for life, respect for religion, and justice), which allow parallel constructs at individual and organizational levels of analysis. It also identifies dimensions used in differentiating organizations’ moral values. These are the act, actor, person affected, intention, and expected result. Finally, the article addresses measurement issues associated with organizational moral values, proposing that content analysis is the (...)
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  30.  39
    Free Will Skepticism in Law and Society: Challenging Retributive Justice.Elizabeth Shaw, Derk Pereboom & Gregg D. Caruso (eds.) - 2019 - New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
    'Free will skepticism' refers to a family of views that all take seriously the possibility that human beings lack the control in action - i.e. the free will - required for an agent to be truly deserving of blame and praise, punishment and reward. Critics fear that adopting this view would have harmful consequences for our interpersonal relationships, society, morality, meaning, and laws. Optimistic free will skeptics, on the other hand, respond by arguing that life without free will and so-called (...)
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  31.  6
    When did that happen? The dynamic unfolding of perceived musical narrative.Elizabeth Hellmuth Margulis, Jamal Williams, Rhimmon Simchy-Gross & J. Devin McAuley - 2022 - Cognition 226 (C):105180.
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  32.  85
    Varieties of Anti-Reductionism About Testimony—A Reply to Goldberg and Henderson.Elizabeth Fricker - 2006 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 72 (3):618-628.
    One of the central points of contention in the epistemology of testimony concerns the uniqueness (or not) of the justification of beliefs formed through testimony-whether such justification can be accounted for in terms of, or 'reduced to,' other familiar sort of justification, e.g. without relying on any epistemic principles unique to testimony. One influential argument for the reductionist position, found in the work of Elizabeth Fricker, argues by appeal to the need for the hearer to monitor the testimony for (...)
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  33.  31
    Infants’ prosocial behavior is governed by cost-benefit analyses.Jessica A. Sommerville, Elizabeth A. Enright, Rachel O. Horton, Kelsey Lucca, Miranda J. Sitch & Susanne Kirchner-Adelhart - 2018 - Cognition 177 (C):12-20.
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  34.  27
    Task effects reveal cognitive flexibility responding to frequency and predictability: Evidence from eye movements in reading and proofreading.Elizabeth R. Schotter, Klinton Bicknell, Ian Howard, Roger Levy & Keith Rayner - 2014 - Cognition 131 (1):1-27.
  35.  32
    Core knowledge, language learning, and the origins of morality and pedagogy: Reply to reviews of What babies know.Elizabeth S. Spelke - 2023 - Mind and Language 38 (5):1336-1350.
    The astute reviews by Hamlin and by Revencu and Csibra provide compelling arguments and evidence for the early emergence of moral evaluation, communication, and pedagogical learning. I accept these conclusions but not the reviewers' claims that infants' talents in these domains depend on core systems of moral evaluation or pedagogical communication. Instead, I suggest that core knowledge of people as agents and as social beings, together with infants' emerging understanding of their native language, support learning about people as moral agents, (...)
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  36.  46
    What Is Energy For? Social Practice and Energy Demand.Elizabeth Shove & Gordon Walker - 2014 - Theory, Culture and Society 31 (5):41-58.
    Energy has an ambivalent status in social theory, variously figuring as a driver or an outcome of social and institutional change, or as something that is woven into the fabric of society itself. In this article the authors consider the underlying models on which different approaches depend. One common strategy is to view energy as a resource base, the management and organization of which depends on various intersecting systems: political, economic and technological. This is not the only route to take. (...)
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  37. Formulating Moral Objectivity.Elizabeth Tropman - 2018 - Philosophia 46 (4):1023-1040.
    Objective moral facts are supposed to be independent from us, but it has proven difficult to provide a clear account of this independence condition. Objective moral facts cannot be overly independent of us, as even an objective morality would depend, in important respects, on features of us. The challenge is to respect these moral mind-dependencies without inappropriately counting too many moral facts as objective. In this paper, I delineate and evaluate several different versions of the independence condition in moral objectivity. (...)
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  38. The switch model of split-brain consciousness.Elizabeth Schechter - 2012 - Philosophical Psychology 25 (2):203 - 226.
    The attempt to model the structure of consciousness in split-brain subjects is ongoing. This paper concerns the recently proposed ?switch model? of split-brain consciousness, according to which a split-brain subject possesses only a single stream of consciousness, unified at and across time, that shifts from one hemisphere to the other from moment to moment. The paper argues that while the central explanatory element of the switch model may account for some aspects of split-brain consciousness, the best general picture of split-brain (...)
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  39. Individuating mental tokens: The split-brain case.Elizabeth Schechter - 2010 - Philosophia 38 (1):195-216.
    Some philosophers have argued that so long as two neural events, within a subject, are both of the same type and both carry the same content, then these events may jointly constitute a single mental token, regardless of the sort of causal relation to each other that they bear. These philosophers have used this claim—which I call the “singularity-through-redundancy” position—in order to argue that a split-brain subject normally has a single stream of consciousness, disjunctively realized across the two hemispheres. This (...)
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  40.  21
    Pronunciation difficulty, temporal regularity, and the speech-to-song illusion.Elizabeth H. Margulis, Rhimmon Simchy-Gross & Justin L. Black - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6:122027.
    The speech-to-song illusion ( Deutsch et al., 2011 ) tracks the perceptual transformation from speech to song across repetitions of a brief spoken utterance. Because it involves no change in the stimulus itself, but a dramatic change in its perceived affiliation to speech or to music, it presents a unique opportunity to comparatively investigate the processing of language and music. In this study, native English-speaking participants were presented with brief spoken utterances that were subsequently repeated ten times. The utterances were (...)
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  41.  22
    Farewell to an Idea: Episodes from a History of ModernismModernism's History: A Study in Twentieth-Century Art.Elizabeth Mansfield, T. J. Clark & Bernard Smith - 2000 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (4):411.
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  42. The unity of consciousness: subjects and objectivity.Elizabeth Schechter - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 165 (2):671-692.
    This paper concerns the role that reference to subjects of experience can play in individuating streams of consciousness, and the relationship between the subjective and the objective structure of consciousness. A critique of Tim Bayne’s recent book indicates certain crucial choices that works on the unity of consciousness must make. If one identifies the subject of experience with something whose consciousness is necessarily unified, then one cannot offer an account of the objective structure of consciousness. Alternatively, identifying the subject of (...)
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  43.  31
    Suspending the next turn as a form of repair initiation: evidence from Argentine Sign Language.Elizabeth Manrique & N. J. Enfield - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  44. Rereading Rawls on self-respect : feminism, family law, and the social bases of self-respect.Elizabeth Brake - 2013 - In Ruth Abbey (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of John Rawls. University Park, Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  45.  33
    Identifying phenomenal consciousness.Elizabeth Schier - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (1):216-222.
    This paper examines the possibility of finding evidence that phenomenal consciousness is independent of access. The suggestion reviewed is that we should look for isomorphisms between phenomenal and neural activation spaces. It is argued that the fact that phenomenal spaces are mapped via verbal report is no problem for this methodology. The fact that activation and phenomenal space are mapped via different means does not mean that they cannot be identified. The paper finishes by examining how data addressing this theoretical (...)
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  46. The implications of free will skepticism for establishing criminal liability.Elizabeth Shaw - 2019 - In Elizabeth Shaw, Derk Pereboom & Gregg D. Caruso (eds.), Free Will Skepticism in Law and Society: Challenging Retributive Justice. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
     
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  47.  12
    Michael Oakeshott on Religion, Aesthetics, and Politics.Elizabeth Campbell Corey - 2006 - University of Missouri.
    For much of his career, British political philosopher Michael Oakeshott was identified with Margaret Thatcher’s conservative policies. He has been called by some a guru to the Tories, while others have considered him one of the last proponents of British Idealism. Best known for such books as _Experience and Its Modes_ and _Rationalism in Politics_, Oakeshott has been the subject of numerous studies, but always with an emphasis on his political thought. Elizabeth Campbell Corey now makes the case that (...)
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  48.  39
    Visiting the Ruins of Detroit: Exploitation or Cultural Tourism?Elizabeth Scarbrough - 2018 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (3):549-566.
    Are Detroit ruin tours a form of morally permissible cultural tourism, or do these tours amount to a form of exploitation? To answer this question I compare Detroit ruin tours with ‘slum tours’ – guided tours of slums in the world's major cities. I argue that exploitation of the sort we find in slum tourism also exists, to a lesser extent, in Detroit ruin tours. To show this I detail two different accounts of exploitation and argue that Ruth Sample's account (...)
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  49.  87
    The knowledge argument and the inadequacy of scientific knowledge.Elizabeth Schier - 2008 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (1):39-62.
    Recently a number of authors have responded to the knowl-edge argument by suggesting that Mary could learn about new physi-cal facts upon release (Flanagan, 1992; Mandik, 2001; Stoljar, 2001; Van Gulick, 1985). A key step in achieving this is a demonstration that there are facts that can be known via colour experience that cannot be learnt scientifically. In this paper I develop an account of scientific and visual knowledge on which there is a difference between the knowledge provided by science (...)
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  50.  11
    ‘Empathy and the boundaries of interpersonal understanding’ – introduction.Katharina Anna Sodoma, Elizabeth Ventham & Christiana Werner - 2024 - Philosophical Explorations 27 (2):123-127.
    One of the reasons why empathy is a topic of enduring interest is the role it can play in understanding others. Empathy can help us to predict each other’s future actions and explain past ones; to...
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