Results for 'Ellen S. More'

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  1. Empathy as a Hermeneutic Practice.Ellen S. More - 1996 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 17 (3).
    This essay will argue for the centrality of empathy in the doctor-patient relationship — as a core of ethically sound, responsible therapeutics. By empathy, I intend an explicitly hermeneutic practice, informed by a reflexive understanding of patient and self. After providing an overview of the history of the concept of empathy in clinical medicine, I discuss current definitions and the use of Balint groups in residency training as a way to develop empathic competence in novice physicians.
     
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  2.  14
    Margaret W. Rossiter. Women Scientists in America. Volume 3: Forging a New World Since 1972. Xx + 426 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012. $45. [REVIEW]Ellen S. More - 2012 - Isis 103 (4):808-810.
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  3.  17
    Physicians' Attitudes Toward Disclosure of Genetic Information to Third Parties.Gail Geller, Ellen S. Tambor, Barbara A. Bernhardt, Gary A. Chase, Karen J. Hofman, Ruth R. Faden & Neil A. Holtzman - 1993 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 21 (2):238-240.
    Confidentiality is a cornerstone of the physician-patient relationship. Breaches of confidentiality in the context of genetic testing are of particular concern for a number of reasons. First, genetic testing reveals information not only about a particular patient, but also about his or her family members. Second,genetic testing can label healthy people as “at risk,” subjecting them to possible stigmatization or discrimination by third parties. Third, as genetic testing becomes more widespread and is incorporated into primary care, breaches of confidentiality (...)
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  4.  18
    Physicians' Attitudes Toward Disclosure of Genetic Information to Third Parties.Gail Geller, Ellen S. Tambor, Barbara A. Bernhardt, Gary A. Chase, Karen J. Hofman, Ruth R. Faden & Neil A. Holtzman - 1993 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 21 (2):238-240.
    Confidentiality is a cornerstone of the physician-patient relationship. Breaches of confidentiality in the context of genetic testing are of particular concern for a number of reasons. First, genetic testing reveals information not only about a particular patient, but also about his or her family members. Second,genetic testing can label healthy people as “at risk,” subjecting them to possible stigmatization or discrimination by third parties. Third, as genetic testing becomes more widespread and is incorporated into primary care, breaches of confidentiality (...)
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  5.  85
    Ethics Consultation in United States Hospitals: A National Survey.Ellen Fox, Sarah Myers & Robert A. Pearlman - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (2):13 – 25.
    Context: Although ethics consultation is commonplace in United States (U.S.) hospitals, descriptive data about this health service are lacking. Objective: To describe the prevalence, practitioners, and processes of ethics consultation in U.S. hospitals. Design: A 56-item phone or questionnaire survey of the "best informant" within each hospital. Participants: Random sample of 600 U.S. general hospitals, stratified by bed size. Results: The response rate was 87.4%. Ethics consultation services (ECSs) were found in 81% of all general hospitals in the U.S., and (...)
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  6. Knowing‐How: Problems and Considerations.Ellen Fridland - 2015 - European Journal of Philosophy 23 (3):703-727.
    In recent years, a debate concerning the nature of knowing-how has emerged between intellectualists who claim that knowledge-how is reducible to knowledge-that and anti-intellectualists who claim that knowledge-how comprises a unique and irreducible knowledge category. The arguments between these two camps have clustered largely around two issues: intellectualists object to Gilbert Ryle's assertion that knowing-how is a kind of ability, and anti-intellectualists take issue with Jason Stanley and Timothy Williamson's positive, intellectualist account of knowing-how. Like most anti-intellectualists, in this paper (...)
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  7.  94
    Questions of Proximity: “Woman's Place” in Derrick and Irigaray.Ellen T. Armour - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (1):63-78.
    This article reconsiders the issue of Luce Irigaray's proximity to Jacques Derrida on the question of woman. I use Derrida's reading of Nietzsche in Spurs: Nietzsche's Styles (1979) and Irigaray's reading of Heidegger in L'Oubli de l'air (1983) to argue that reading them as supplements to one another is more accurate and more productive for feminism than separating one from the other. I conclude by laying out the benefits for feminism that such a reading would offer.
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  8.  44
    The Swashbuckling Anthropologist: Henrich on The Secret of Our Success. [REVIEW]Ellen Clarke & Cecilia Heyes - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (2):289-305.
    In The Secret of Our Success, Joseph Henrich claims that human beings are unique—different from all other animals—because we engage in cumulative cultural evolution. It is the technological and social products of cumulative cultural evolution, not the intrinsic rationality or ‘smartness’ of individual humans, that enable us to live in a huge range of different habitats, and to dominate most of the creatures who share those habitats with us. We are sympathetic to this general view, the latest expression of the (...)
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  9. The Stranger in Immigrant Integration.Ellen Jacobsson - 2020 - Schutzian Research 12:81-102.
    This paper suggests that Alfred Schutz’s account of systems of typi­fication together with Sara Ahmed’s account of the proximity of the stranger allows for a different understanding of social integration. The paper proposes to rethink the political and social relationship of the in-group and the stranger, approached through the face-to-face encounter between an integration counselor and an immigrant. The encounter offers a disruption of what is taken for granted by the in-group and functions as a catalyst for a system of (...)
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  10.  14
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on "Ethics Consultation in U.S. Hospitals: A National Survey".Ellen Fox, Sarah Myers & Robert Pearlman - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (2):1-3.
    Context: Although ethics consultation is commonplace in United States hospitals, descriptive data about this health service are lacking. Objective: To describe the prevalence, practitioners, and processes of ethics consultation in U.S. hospitals. Design: A 56-item phone or questionnaire survey of the “best informant” within each hospital. Participants: Random sample of 600 U.S. general hospitals, stratified by bed size. Results: The response rate was 87.4%. Ethics consultation services were found in 81% of all general hospitals in the U.S., and in 100% (...)
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  11.  30
    Consumer’s Stated Trust in the Food Industry and Meat Purchases.Larissa S. Drescher, Janneke de Jonge, Ellen Goddard & Thomas Herzfeld - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (4):507-517.
    Research indicates that consumers are particularly concerned about the safety of meat. More highly processed meat is perceived as more unsafe than fresh or natural meats, i.e., consumers trust processed meat less. This paper studies the relationship between perceived trust and day-to-day purchase behavior for meat, giving special attention to the degree of meat processing. Controlling for trust in food chain actors and demographic and socio-economic variables, actual meat purchases of Canadian households are linked to answers from a (...)
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  12.  14
    Questions of Proximity: “Woman's Place” in Derrick and Irigaray.Ellen T. Armour - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (1):63-78.
    This article reconsiders the issue of Luce Irigaray's proximity to Jacques Derrida on the question of woman. I use Derrida's reading of Nietzsche in Spurs: Nietzsche's Styles and Irigaray's reading of Heidegger in L'Oubli de l'air to argue that reading them as supplements to one another is more accurate and more productive for feminism than separating one from the other. I conclude by laying out the benefits for feminism that such a reading would offer.
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  13.  19
    Horizontal Relations: A Note on Brenner's Heresy.Ellen Meiksins Wood - 1999 - Historical Materialism 4 (1):171-180.
    One fundamental assumption seems to underlie – explicitly or implicitly – every critique of Brenner I have seen: that there can be no such thing as a Marxist theory of competition, the ‘horizontal’ relation among many capitals, that does not presuppose the ‘vertical’ class relation between capital and living labour. To start with the relation between capital and living labour is the only way to establish one's Marxist credentials. In support of that assumption, more than one critic has invoked (...)
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  14.  19
    Suturing the Body Corporate (Divine and Human) in the Brahmanic Traditions.Ellen Stansell - 2010 - Sophia 49 (2):237-259.
    In this discussion, we ponder the discourse about the ‘body of the Divine’ in the Indian tradition. Beginning with the Vedas, we survey the major eras and thinkers of that tradition, considering various notions of the Supreme Divine Being it produced. For each, we ask: is the Divine embodied? If so, then in what way? What is the nature of the body of the Divine, and what is its relationship to human bodies? What is the value of the body of (...)
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  15.  36
    Linking Future Population Food Requirements for Health with Local Production in Waterloo Region, Canada.Ellen Desjardins, Rod MacRae & Theresa Schumilas - 2010 - Agriculture and Human Values 27 (2):129-140.
    Regional planning for improved agricultural capacity to supply produce, legumes, and whole grains has the potential to improve population health as well as the local food economy. This case study of Waterloo Region (WR), Canada, had two objectives. First, we estimate the quantity of locally grown vegetables, fruits, legumes, and whole grains needed to help meet the Region of Waterloo population’s optimal nutritional requirements currently and in 2026. Secondly, we estimate how much of these healthy food requirements for the WR (...)
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  16.  66
    Inspiring Respect for Animals Through the Law? Current Development in the Norwegian Animal Welfare Legislation.Ellen-Marie Forsberg - 2011 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (4):351-366.
    Over the last years, Norway has revised its animal welfare legislation. As of January 1, 2010, the Animal Protection Act of 1974 was replaced by a new Animal Welfare Act. This paper describes the developments in the normative structures from the old to the new act, as well as the main traits of the corresponding implementation and governance system. In the Animal Protection Act, the basic animal ethics principles were to avoid suffering, treat animals well, and consider their natural needs (...)
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  17.  7
    Incidental Findings in Genetics Research Using Archived DNA.Ellen Wright Clayton - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):286-291.
    There are countless variations on this theme. The call can come from one of your own physicians who was called by the investigator. Your physician may or may not be well informed on what the reported finding about Disease Y means or how to respond. DNA testing can reveal more than susceptibility to disease. People can learn that they do not have the biological connections — parentage or evidence of ethnic origin — that they thought they did.Colleagues who serve (...)
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  18.  99
    Values, Authenticity, and Responsible Leadership.R. Edward Freeman & Ellen R. Auster - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (S1):15-23.
    The recent financial crisis has prompted questioning of our basic ideas about capitalism and the role of business in society. As scholars are calling for “responsible leadership” to become more of the norm, organizations are being pushed to enact new values, such as “responsibility” and “sustainability,” and pay more attention to the effects of their actions on their stakeholders. The purpose of this study is to open up a line of research in business ethics on the concept of (...)
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  19.  12
    Who's Left Out? A Rose by Any Other Name Is Still Red; Or, the Politics of Pluralism.Ellen Rooney - 1986 - Critical Inquiry 12 (3):550-563.
    The practical difficulties that trouble any effort to discuss “pluralism” in American literary studies can be glimpsed in the following exchange. In a 1980 interview in the Literary Review of Edinburgh, Ken Newton put this question to Derrida:It might be argued that deconstruction inevitably leads to pluralist interpretation and ultimately to the view that any interpretation is as good as any other. Do you believe this and how do you select some interpretations as being better than others?Derrida replied:I am not (...)
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  20.  37
    Clytemnestra at the Mall: A Plea for More Improvisational Pedagogy in the Arts.Ellen Handler Spitz - 2010 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 44 (4):33.
    A work of art no matter how old and classic is actually, not just potentially, a work of art only when it lives in some individualized experience. . . . It cannot be asserted too strongly that what is not immediate is not aesthetic. Let’s imagine a young professor who receives a poor review of her teaching because she fails, when observed, to complete what she had initially set out to accomplish in the specific class meeting under critique. Assessment, after (...)
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  21.  12
    Is It Ethical to Enroll Cognitively Impaired Adults in Research That Is More Than Minimal Risk With No Prospect of Benefit?Holly A. Taylor, Ellen Kuwana & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (10):64-65.
  22.  17
    The Relationship Between Supervisor Personality, Supervisors' Perceived Stress and Workplace Bullying.Gro Ellen Mathisen, Ståle Einarsen & Reidar Mykletun - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (4):637 - 651.
    This study investigated the relationship between supervisor personality and subordinate reports of exposure to bullying and harassment at work. Three research questions were examined: (a) Is there a direct relationship between supervisor personality and reports of workplace bullying? (b) Is there an interaction between supervisor personality and supervisors' perceived stress as predictors of workplace bullying? (c) Will subordinates who experience bullying at their workplace rate their supervisor's personality more negatively (negative halo effect)? The sample consisted of 207 supervisors and (...)
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  23.  12
    The Relationship Between Supervisor Personality, Supervisors’ Perceived Stress and Workplace Bullying.Gro Ellen Mathisen, Ståle Einarsen & Reidar Mykletun - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (4):637-651.
    This study investigated the relationship between supervisor personality and subordinate reports of exposure to bullying and harassment at work. Three research questions were examined: Is there a direct relationship between supervisor personality and reports of workplace bullying? Is there an interaction between supervisor personality and supervisors’ perceived stress as predictors of workplace bullying? Will subordinates who experience bullying at their workplace rate their supervisor’s personality more negatively? The sample consisted of 207 supervisors and employees within 70 Norwegian restaurants. Supervisors (...)
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  24. Self-Interest: Volume 14, Part 1.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 1997 - Cambridge University Press.
    '[T]he good man should be a lover of self.' Aristotle wrote. 'For he will both himself profit by doing noble acts, and will benefit his fellows … '. Yet in much of contemporary moral philosophy, concern for one's own interests is considered a non-moral issue, while concern for the interests of others is paradigmatically moral. Indeed, a central issue in ethical theory involves the proper balance to be struck between prudence and morality, between the pursuit of one's own good and (...)
     
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  25.  21
    Why Ellen Laughed.Norman N. Holland - 1980 - Critical Inquiry 7 (2):345-371.
    I propose this: Ellen [a graduate student] laughs because she is re-creating her identity. This theory differs from the others because "identity" is not simply a category that is filled or not, like "incongruity" or "superiority" which become variables in an "if this, then that" explanation. "If there is a sudden incongruity, people will laugh." Rather, identity is a further question, a way of asking, Can I understand Ellen's actions as a theme and variations? Moreover, any such interpretation (...)
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  26.  5
    Does Art Bring Us Together? An Empirical Approach to the Evolutionary Aesthetics of Ellen Dissanayake.Brady Fullerton - 2020 - Biological Theory 15 (4):188-195.
    Over the last several decades Ellen Dissanayake has developed an evolutionary theory of art that views all art as having evolved for the function of promoting group cohesion. This theory is not without its critics, yet it has received little empirical attention. In this article I propose a more modest formulation of Dissanayake’s hypothesis and proceed to test it using a cross-cultural analysis. I rely on the ethnographic databases of the electronic Human Relations Area Files as well as (...)
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  27.  17
    The Chan Mind: Transmission or Mission-of-Translation? Reading Wright's Philosophical Meditations.Ellen Zhang - 2004 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 4 (1):15-29.
    Wright maintains that tradition (including language) plays a fundamental role in the origins and shaping of the monastic world that made a unique Chan mind possible. Through a creative application of the Buddhist idea of dependent origination, Wright has broadened the hermeneutic concept of historicity in that it is more than a linear and causal relationship of contextuality (that is, the person is always a person-in-community, and the text is always a text-in-context). Instead, contextuality refers to a (w)holistic network (...)
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  28. Maternalism and Political Mobilization: How California's Postwar Child Care Campaign Was Won.Ellen Reese - 1996 - Gender and Society 10 (5):566-589.
    Unlike other states, California retained a large proportion of the child care centers that had been established during World War II. In 1946, the California state government allocated state funds for child care in response to a vigorous child care campaign. The campaign, which was, in large part, a working mothers movement, was a “transformed maternalist” movement. It used maternalist rhetoric to defend state-subsidized child care that was criticized by more traditional maternalists. Using resource mobilization theory, I explain the (...)
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  29.  52
    The Complete Works of Harriet Taylor Mill.Jo Ellen Jacobs (ed.) - 1998 - Indiana University Press.
    For 170 years, Harriet Taylor Mill has been presented as a footnote in John Stuart Mill’s life. This volume gives her a separate voice. Readers may assess for themselves the importance and influence of her ideas on "women’s" issues such as marriage and divorce, education, domestic violence, and suffrage. And they will note the overlap of her ideas on ethics, religion, arts, and socialism, written in the 1830s, with her more famous husband’s works, published 25 years later.
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  30.  16
    The Changing Composition of a Hospital Ethics Committee: A Tertiary Care Center’s Experience. [REVIEW]Andrew Courtwright, Sharon Brackett, Alexandra Cist, M. Cornelia Cremens, Eric L. Krakauer & Ellen M. Robinson - 2014 - HEC Forum 26 (1):59-68.
    A growing body of research has demonstrated significant heterogeneity of hospital ethics committee (HEC) size, membership and training requirements, length of appointment, institutional support, clinical and policy roles, and predictors of self identified success. Because these studies have focused on HECs at a single point in time, however, little is known about how the composition of HECs changes over time and what impact these changes have on committee utilization. The current study presents 20 years of data on the evolution of (...)
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  31.  52
    Beyond Consent in Research.Emily Bell, Eric Racine, Paula Chiasson, Maya Dufourcq-Brana, Laura B. Dunn, Joseph J. Fins, Paul J. Ford, Walter Glannon, Nir Lipsman, Mary Ellen Macdonald, Debra J. H. Mathews & Mary Pat Mcandrews - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (3):361-368.
    Vulnerability is an important criterion to assess the ethical justification of the inclusion of participants in research trials. Currently, vulnerability is often understood as an attribute inherent to a participant by nature of a diagnosed condition. Accordingly, a common ethical concern relates to the participant’s decisionmaking capacity and ability to provide free and informed consent. We propose an expanded view of vulnerability that moves beyond a focus on consent and the intrinsic attributes of participants. We offer specific suggestions for how (...)
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  32.  7
    “That’s the Way We’Ve Always Done It”: A Social Practice Analysis of Farm Animal Welfare in Alberta.Emilie M. Bassi, Ellen Goddard & John R. Parkins - 2019 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 32 (2):335-354.
    Although beef and dairy production in Alberta, Canada, enjoys strong public support, there are enduring public concerns, including farm animal welfare. Evolving codes of practice and animal care councils prescribe changes and improvements to many areas of farm management, and may be seen by farmers as an appropriate response to public animal welfare concerns. However, codes of practice do not address every animal welfare concern, and new concerns can arise over time. Drawing on social practice theory and in-depth field research (...)
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  33.  95
    Blinding Me with (Queer) Science: Religion, Sexuality, and (Post?) Modernity. [REVIEW]Ellen T. Armour - 2010 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 68 (1-3):107-119.
    This essay brings to bear insights from continental philosophers Michel Foucault and Judith Butler on the science of (homo)sexuality and, more importantly, the desire to use such science to resolve contemporary conflicts over homosexuality’s acceptability. So-called queer science remains deeply beholden to modern notions of sex, gender, and sexuality, the author argues, a schematic that its premodern (Christian) roots further denaturalize. The philosophical insights drawn from this analysis are then applied to the controversy over homosexuality within global Christianity that (...)
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  34.  10
    Sex the Measure of All Things: A Life of Alfred C. Kinsey. [REVIEW]Ellen Herman - 2002 - Isis 93:134-135.
    The role of Alfred Kinsey, America's most influential sexologist, in the cultural revolution of sex and gender during the past fifty years remains as unquestionable as it has been controversial. This admiring biography argues that Kinsey also qualifies as an authentic great man of science in the tradition of Darwin. Kinsey's expert authority was recently challenged by James Jones, who claimed in his 1997 biography that Kinsey's terrible personal secrets—homosexuality and masochism—plagued his life and ruined his science. Jonathan Gathorne‐Hardy sets (...)
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  35. Negotiating Courtship: Reconciling Egalitarian Ideals with Traditional Gender Norms.Ellen Lamont - 2014 - Gender and Society 28 (2):189-211.
    Traditional courtship norms delineate distinct gendered behaviors for men and women based on the model of a dominant, breadwinning male and a passive, dependent female. Previous research shows, however, that as women have increased their access to earned income, there has been a rising ideological and behavioral commitment to egalitarian relationships. Drawing on in-depth interviews with 38 college-educated women, this article explores how women negotiate these seemingly contradictory beliefs in order to understand how and why gendered courtship conventions persist even (...)
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  36.  13
    Moral Consensus in Public Ethics: Patient Autonomy and Family Decisionmaking in the Work of One State Bioethics Commission.Ellen H. Moskowitz - 1996 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 21 (2):149-168.
    Focusing on the work of one bioethics commission, the New York State Task Force on Life and the Law, this article explores the role played by moral consensus in public ethics. Task Force members, who were appointed to represent diverse interests in New York State, identified a culturally strong value of individual autonomy as the ethical basis for their work on life-sustaining treatment. This moral consensus permitted the members to unite across their differences and develop public policy recommendations that substantially (...)
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  37.  15
    Rights and Reason: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Rights.Ellen Frankel Paul - 2005 - Review of Metaphysics 58 (4):896-898.
    Of the historical figures that Gorman examines, none is more antithetical to the pluralist account of often antagonistic and conflicting rights that he favors than John Locke. To the questions that he poses for Plato and Hobbes—about how rights can be authoritative, how individual choices can be constrained by rights, how rights can be justified, and how can such moral considerations motivate people—he finds in Locke the most simplistic and unsatisfactory answers. Locke’s reliance on both God and reason to (...)
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  38.  29
    A Psychoanalytic Approach to Fieldwork.Ellen Ramvi - 2012 - Journal of Research Practice 8 (2):Article - M8.
    This article focuses on what both psychoanalysis and anthropology have in common: the emphasis on the researcher's own experience. An ethnographic fieldwork will be used to illustrate how a psychoanalytical approach unfolds the material when studying conditions for learning from experience among teachers in two Norwegian junior high schools, and also the strong methodological implications of this approach. The researcher's struggle to remain open is elaborated. Here "openness" is regarded as something more than a principle for research practice. It (...)
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  39.  1
    A Guardian of the UN Charter: The UN Secretary-General at Seventy-Five.Ellen J. Ravndal - 2020 - Ethics and International Affairs 34 (3):297-304.
    Over the past seventy-five years, the UN secretary-general has come to occupy a highly visible position in world politics. While the UN Charter describes the post merely as the “chief administrative officer” of the organization, today it is widely recognized that the secretary-general also plays a central role in political matters. What makes the role of the UN secretary-general special? Where does the office's authority come from? As part of the special issue on “The United Nations at Seventy-Five: Looking Back (...)
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  40. Invisible Victims? Where Are Male Victims of Conflict-Related Sexual Violence in International Law and Policy?Ellen Anna Philo Gorris - 2015 - European Journal of Women's Studies 22 (4):412-427.
    In this article the author argues that men and boys have been historically and structurally rendered an invisible group of victims in international human rights and policy responses towards conflict-related sexual violence stemming from the United Nations. The apparent female-focused approach of instruments on sexual violence is criticized followed by a discussion – through analysis and interviews with legal scholars and champions for the recognition of male survivors’ experiences – of the first ‘emergence’ of male victims in these instruments and (...)
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  41.  11
    Natural Settings Trials ? Improving the Introduction of Clinical Genetic Tests.Carol L. Freund, Ellen W. Clayton & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (1):106-110.
    Many new genetic tests are used in clinical practice, and the number of available tests is growing. Two important health policy questions arise as these genetic tests become available. The first question, whether a new test should be made available, has been the focus of much recent discussion. The second question concerns defining the appropriate standards surrounding the use of these tests, including patient selection, education, informed consent, test interpretation and counseling.Genetic tests currently move from the research arena, where strategies (...)
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  42.  12
    Natural Settings Trials — Improving the Introduction of Clinical Genetic Tests.Carol L. Freund, Ellen W. Clayton & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (1):106-110.
    Many new genetic tests are used in clinical practice, and the number of available tests is growing. Two important health policy questions arise as these genetic tests become available. The first question, whether a new test should be made available, has been the focus of much recent discussion. The second question concerns defining the appropriate standards surrounding the use of these tests, including patient selection, education, informed consent, test interpretation and counseling.Genetic tests currently move from the research arena, where strategies (...)
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  43.  18
    Horizontal Relations: A Note on Brenner's Heresy.Ellen Meiksins Wood - 1999 - Historical Materialism 4 (1):171-179.
    One fundamental assumption seems to underlie – explicitly or implicitly – every critique of Brenner I have seen: that there can be no such thing as a Marxist theory of competition, the ‘horizontal’ relation among many capitals, that does not presuppose the ‘vertical’ class relation between capital and living labour. To start with the relation between capital and living labour is the only way to establish one's Marxist credentials. In support of that assumption, more than one critic has invoked (...)
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  44.  31
    How We Count Hunger Matters.Frances Moore Lappé, Jennifer Clapp, Molly Anderson, Robin Broad, Ellen Messer, Thomas Pogge & Timothy Wise - 2013 - Ethics and International Affairs 27 (3):251-259.
    Hunger continues to be one of humanity's greatest challenges despite the existence of a more-than-adequate global food supply equal to 2,800 kilocalories for every person every day. In measuring progress, policy-makers and concerned citizens across the globe rely on information supplied by the Food and Agriculture Organization , an agency of the United Nations. In 2010 the FAO reported that in the wake of the 2007–2008 food-price spikes and global economic crisis, the number of people experiencing hunger worldwide since (...)
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  45.  5
    The Role of a Hospital Ethics Consultation Service in Decision-Making for Unrepresented Patients.Andrew M. Courtwright, Joshua Abrams & Ellen M. Robinson - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (2):241-250.
    Despite increased calls for hospital ethics committees to serve as default decision-makers about life-sustaining treatment for unrepresented patients who lack decision-making capacity or a surrogate decision-maker and whose wishes regarding medical care are not known, little is known about how committees currently function in these cases. This was a retrospective cohort study of all ethics committee consultations involving decision-making about LST for unrepresented patients at a large academic hospital from 2007 to 2013. There were 310 ethics committee consultations, twenty-five of (...)
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  46.  27
    Correction and Use of Biomedical Literature Affected by Scientific Misconduct.Anne Victoria Neale, Justin Northrup, Rhonda Dailey, Ellen Marks & Judith Abrams - 2007 - Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (1):5-24.
    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe published research articles that were named in official findings of scientific misconduct and to investigate compliance with the administrative actions contained in these reports for corrections and retractions, as represented in PubMed. Between 1993 and 2001, 102 articles were named in either the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts (“Findings of Scientific Misconduct”) or the U.S. Office of Research Integrity annual reports as needing retraction or correction. In 2002, 98 of (...)
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  47.  14
    Reactions of Potential Jurors to a Hypothetical Malpractice Suit Alleging Failure to Perform a Prostate-Specific Antigen Test.Michael J. Barry, Pamela H. Wescott, Ellen J. Reifler, Yuchaio Chang & Benjamin W. Moulton - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):396-402.
    Screening for prostate cancer with the prostate-specific antigen blood test is controversial, as evidence to date has not demonstrated such screening does more good than harm. While the potential benefit of PSA screening on reducing prostate cancer mortality has not been documented in randomized trials, many risks of PSA screening have been well documented. These risks include a substantially higher risk of a prostate cancer diagnosis over a screenee’s lifetime, false-positive and false-negative test results, possible complications from biopsies done (...)
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  48.  5
    The Under-Representation of African American Employees in Animal Welfare Organizations in the United States.Sue-Ellen Brown - 2005 - Society and Animals 13 (2):153-162.
    The purpose of this research was to document the alleged underrepresentation of African Americans employed in U.S. nonhuman animal welfare organizations. A telephone survey of 32 animal welfare organizations yielded responses from 13 with 1,584 employees. Almost all organizations were reluctant to respond. Of the 13 organizations responding, 62% had no African American employees. African Americans made up 4% of the total number of employees with only 0.8% at the top levels . African Americans never made up more than (...)
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  49.  8
    The Feminist Imagination.Jan Ellen Lewis - 2004 - Modern Intellectual History 1 (3):411-425.
    Barbara Taylor, Mary Wollstonecraft and the Feminist Imagination Ruth H. Bloch, Gender and Morality in Anglo-American Culture, 1650–1800 Barbara Taylor entitles her new book Mary Wollstonecraft and the Feminist Imagination. The imagination in question is Wollstonecraft's, but, like Wollstonecraft, Taylor is interested in the imagination more generally, both the problems that the imagination gets women into and the ways in which the feminist imagination can get women out of those problems and help them imagine a more just and (...)
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  50.  25
    Experimental Arrest of Cerebral Blood Flow in Human Subjects: The Red Wing Studies Revisited.Brian A. Smith, Ellen Wright Clayton & David Robertson - 2011 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (2):121-131.
    Aircraft with increasingly high performance were important to the war effort in World War II. Changes in technology allowed aircraft to reach faster speeds and to complete missions at higher altitudes. With these changes came new obstacles for pilots who had to tolerate these stresses. Of primary concern to the U.S. War Department was the loss of consciousness that often occurred with high-speed maneuvers and especially during pull-up after dive-bombing missions. In some cases, pilots would experience up to 9G of (...)
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