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Elliot L. Jurist [15]Elliot Jurist [3]
  1.  20
    Critique, Norm, and Utopia: A Study of the Foundations of Critical Theory.Elliot L. Jurist - 1986. - Journal of Philosophy 86 (4):203-208.
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  2.  44
    Hegel’s Concept of Recognition.Elliot L. Jurist - 1987 - The Owl of Minerva 19 (1):5-22.
    The concept of recognition has been thrust into the center of Hegel scholarship in the last fifty years for two main reasons. First, the publication of the Jena manuscripts showed recognition to be a fundamental and pervasive theme in Hegel’s early systematic efforts. It is in fact possible to distinguish and evaluate these works according to the role that recognition plays within them. Second, the master-slave section of the Phenomenology of Spirit, in which the concept of recognition is introduced, has (...)
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  3.  7
    Review of How Emotions Are Made: The Secret Life of the Brain. [REVIEW]Elliot Jurist - 2019 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 39 (3):193-198.
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  4.  6
    Beyond Hegel and Nietzsche: Philosophy, Culture, and Agency.Elliot L. Jurist - 2002 - MIT Press.
    Are Hegel and Nietzsche philosophical opposites? Can twentieth-century Continental philosophers be categorized as either Hegelians or Nietzscheans? In this book Elliot Jurist places Hegel and Nietzsche in conversation with each other, reassessing their relationship in a way that affirms its complexity. Jurist examines Hegel's and Nietzsche's claim that philosophy and culture are linked and explicates the various meanings of "culture" in their work--in particular, the contrast both thinkers draw between ancient and modern culture. He evaluates their positions on the failure (...)
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  5.  37
    Moses Hess: Prophet of Communism and Zionism.Elliot L. Jurist - 1990 - The Owl of Minerva 22 (1):103-108.
    Avineri’s book offers a genuinely integrated portrait of Hess. It departs from Isaiah Berlin’s influential reading of Hess as a youthful socialist who, owing to the failure of revolution in 1848, matured as a Zionist. Rather, Avineri highlights both the proto-Zionist elements in Hess’ earliest works and the enduring socialist element in his most important book, Rome and Jerusalem. Hess’ distinctive contribution as a thinker is located in his resolute interest in both socialism and nationalism.
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  6.  2
    Recognizing the Past.Elliot L. Jurist - 1992 - History and Theory 31 (2):163-181.
    The philosophical past, once a thing of the past, is with us again. I examine three recent positions about how to understand the philosophical past: the presentism of Richard Rorty, the traditionalism of Alasdair MacIntyre, and the interpretism of Charles Taylor. Rorty, MacIntyre, and Taylor all acknowledge a Hegelian influence upon their views; thus, I also explore Hegel's own view of the history of philosophy. Finally, I offer my own view that our relation to the past ought to be guided (...)
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  7.  33
    The Philosophical Propaedeutic.Elliot L. Jurist - 1990 - The Owl of Minerva 21 (2):203-205.
    Hegel scholars will be pleased to discover Miller’s new translation of Hegel’s Philosophical Propaedeutic, which is a revised and completed version of W.T. Harris’ partial translation which appeared in the 1860s. PPr, discovered by Karl Rosenkranz in 1838 and published in 1840, is based upon lectures given when Hegel was Rector of the Gymnasium in Nuremberg between 1808 and 1811. Rosenkranz’s ordering of the lectures according to age levels has been preserved by the editors of the new translation, Michael George (...)
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  8.  38
    Recognition: Fichte and Hegel on the Other.Elliot L. Jurist - 1994 - The Owl of Minerva 26 (1):59-65.
    A good argument can be made for the view that the single most crucial concept in all continental philosophy is “recognition.” To defend such a view, first of all, would be one way to emphasize how indifferent analytic philosophy has been to the web of issues which recognition denotes - such as self-knowledge, alterity, intersubjectivity, and communitarianism. Indeed, the comparable analytic issues like “personal identity” and “other minds” hardly begin to address the complexity of what is at stake in recognition. (...)
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  9.  12
    Recognition: Fichte and Hegel on the Other. [REVIEW]Elliot L. Jurist - 1994 - The Owl of Minerva 26 (1):59-65.
    A good argument can be made for the view that the single most crucial concept in all continental philosophy is “recognition.” To defend such a view, first of all, would be one way to emphasize how indifferent analytic philosophy has been to the web of issues which recognition denotes - such as self-knowledge, alterity, intersubjectivity, and communitarianism. Indeed, the comparable analytic issues like “personal identity” and “other minds” hardly begin to address the complexity of what is at stake in recognition. (...)
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  10.  5
    Moses Hess: Prophet of Communism and Zionism. [REVIEW]Elliot L. Jurist - 1990 - The Owl of Minerva 22 (1):103-108.
    Avineri’s book offers a genuinely integrated portrait of Hess. It departs from Isaiah Berlin’s influential reading of Hess as a youthful socialist who, owing to the failure of revolution in 1848, matured as a Zionist. Rather, Avineri highlights both the proto-Zionist elements in Hess’ earliest works and the enduring socialist element in his most important book, Rome and Jerusalem. Hess’ distinctive contribution as a thinker is located in his resolute interest in both socialism and nationalism.
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  11.  11
    Review of Richard Boothby, Freud As Philosopher: Metapsychology After Lacan[REVIEW]Elliot L. Jurist - 2002 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (5).
  12.  2
    He Does Mind: Susan Sugarman: What Freud Really Meant: A Chronological Reconstruction of His Theory of Mind. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016, 192p, $29.99 PB.Elliot Jurist - 2016 - Metascience 25 (3):417-419.
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  13.  1
    Culture and Cognition.Elliot L. Jurist - 1995 - Metaphilosophy 26 (1-2):153-158.
  14. Affects and Agency: An Interdisciplinary, Psychoanalytic Study.Elliot L. Jurist - 1997 - Dissertation, City University of New York
    There is currently a burgeoning interest in affects across a number of disciplines--philosophy, psychology, neuroscience and psychoanalysis. Yet, it remains unclear to what extent one can infer that a common set of problems and concerns exists. In this project, therefore, I undertake an interdisciplinary inquiry with the aim of providing conceptual clarity about the meaning and function of affects. In particular, I begin with the history of philosophy; then I turn to focus upon psychology--exploring the notion of "basic emotions" as (...)
     
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  15.  7
    Beyond Hegel and Nietzsche: Philosophy, Culture, and Agency.Elliot L. Jurist - 2000 - MIT Press.
    Are Hegel and Nietzsche philosophical opposites? Can twentieth-century Continental philosophers be categorized as either Hegelians or Nietzscheans? In this book Elliot Jurist places Hegel and Nietzsche in conversation with each other, reassessing their relationship in a way that affirms its complexity. Jurist examines Hegel's and Nietzsche's claim that philosophy and culture are linked and explicates the various meanings of "culture" in their work--in particular, the contrast both thinkers draw between ancient and modern culture. He evaluates their positions on the failure (...)
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  16. Hegel's Concept of Recognition: Its Origins, Development and Significance.Elliot L. Jurist - 1983 - Dissertation, Columbia University
    The fundamental aim of this study will be to offer a precise account of the meaning of Hegel's concept of recognition as it is found in the early Jena-Schriften and the Phenomenology of Spirit . However, in locating the origins of the concept in Greek tragedy, we will also be led beyond the meaning of the concept to its significance. Its significance is established most clearly insofar as the concept can be used to form the basis of an overall interpretation (...)
     
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  17. Reflective Authenticity: Rethinking the Project of Modernity. [REVIEW]Elliot Jurist - 1999 - Radical Philosophy 97.
     
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  18. Ronald Schleifer, Robert Con Davis, and Nancy Mergler, "Culture and Cognition".Elliot L. Jurist - 1995 - Metaphilosophy 26 (1):153.
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