Results for 'Elliott Lieb'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Probabilistic coherence and proper scoring rules.Joel Predd, Robert Seiringer, Elliott Lieb, Daniel Osherson, H. Vincent Poor & Sanjeev Kulkarni - 2009 - IEEE Transactions on Information Theory 55 (10):4786-4792.
    We provide self-contained proof of a theorem relating probabilistic coherence of forecasts to their non-domination by rival forecasts with respect to any proper scoring rule. The theorem recapitulates insights achieved by other investigators, and clarifi es the connection of coherence and proper scoring rules to Bregman divergence.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   68 citations  
  2.  63
    Financial Conflicts of Interest and Criteria for Research Credibility.Kevin C. Elliott - 2014 - Erkenntnis 79 (S5):917-937.
    The potential for financial conflicts of interest (COIs) to damage the credibility of scientific research has become a significant social concern, especially in the wake of high-profile incidents involving the pharmaceutical, tobacco, fossil-fuel, and chemical industries. Scientists and policy makers have debated whether the presence of financial COIs should count as a reason for treating research with suspicion or whether research should instead be evaluated solely based on its scientific quality. This paper examines a recent proposal to develop criteria for (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  3.  9
    Althusser: the detour of theory.Gregory Elliott - 1987 - New York: Verso.
    First published in 1987, Althusser, The Detour of Theory was widely received as the fullest account of its subject to date. Drawing on a wide range of hitherto untranslated material, it examined the political and intellectual contexts of Althusser's `return to Marx' in the mid-1960s and proclamaed of a `crisis of Marxism'. It concluded with a balance-sheet of Althusser's contribution to historical materialism. In this second edition, Gregory Elliott has added a substantial postscript in which he surveys the posthumous (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  4. Ecological complexity.Alkistis Elliott-Graves - 2023 - New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
    How does the complex nature of ecological systems affect ecologists' ability to study them? This Element argues that ecological systems are complex in a rather special way: they are causally heterogeneous. The author presents an updated philosophical account with an optimistic outlook of the methods and status of ecological research.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  49
    Conceptual Issues in Evolutionary Biology.Elliott Sober (ed.) - 1994 - The Mit Press. Bradford Books.
    Changes and additions in the new edition reflect the ways in which the subject has broadened and deepened on several fronts; more than half of the-chapters are ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   88 citations  
  6. Moral Kombat: Analytic Naturalism and Moral Disagreement.Edward Elliott & Jessica Isserow - forthcoming - Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
    Moral naturalists are often said to have trouble making sense of inter-communal moral disagreements. The culprit is typically thought to be the naturalist’s metasemantics and its implications for sameness of meaning across communities. The most familiar incarnation of this metasemantic challenge is the Moral Twin Earth argument. We address the challenge from the perspective of analytic naturalism, and argue that making sense of inter-communal moral disagreement creates no special issues for this view.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. The procreation asymmetry, improvable-life avoidance and impairable-life acceptance.Elliott Thornley - 2023 - Analysis 83 (3):517-526.
    Many philosophers are attracted to a complaints-based theory of the procreation asymmetry, according to which creating a person with a bad life is wrong (all else equal) because that person can complain about your act, whereas declining to create a person who would have a good life is not wrong (all else equal) because that person never exists and so cannot complain about your act. In this paper, I present two problems for such theories: the problem of impairable-life acceptance and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8. Fitness and the Twins.Elliott Sober - 2020 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 12 (1):1-13.
    Michael Scriven’s (1959) example of identical twins (who are said to be equal in fitness but unequal in their reproductive success) has been used by many philosophers of biology to discuss how fitness should be defined, how selection should be distinguished from drift, and how the environment in which a selection process occurs should be conceptualized. Here it is argued that evolutionary theory has no commitment, one way or the other, as to whether the twins are equally fit. This is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  9. What is wrong with intelligent design?Elliott Sober - 2007 - Quarterly Review of Biology 82 (1):3-8.
    This article reviews two standard criticisms of creationism/intelligent design (ID): it is unfalsifiable, and it is refuted by the many imperfect adaptations found in nature. Problems with both criticisms are discussed. A conception of testability is described that avoids the defects in Karl Popper’s falsifiability criterion. Although ID comes in multiple forms, which call for different criticisms, it emerges that ID fails to constitute a serious alternative to evolutionary theory.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  10. Natural selection, causality, and laws: What Fodor and piatelli-palmarini got wrong.Elliott Sober - 2010 - Philosophy of Science 77 (4):594-607.
    In their book What Darwin Got Wrong, Jerry Fodor and Massimo Piattelli-Palmarini construct an a priori philosophical argument and an empirical biological argument. The biological argument aims to show that natural selection is much less important in the evolutionary process than many biologists maintain. The a priori argument begins with the claim that there cannot be selection for one but not the other of two traits that are perfectly correlated in a population; it concludes that there cannot be an evolutionary (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  11. Holism, Individualism, and the Units of Selection.Elliott Sober - 1980 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1980:93 - 121.
    Developing a definition of group selection, and applying that definition to the dispute in the social sciences between methodological holists and methodological individualists, are the two goals of this paper. The definition proposed distinguishes between changes in groups that are due to group selection and changes in groups that are artefacts of selection processes occurring at lower levels of organization. It also explains why the existence of group selection is not implied by the mere fact that fitness values of organisms (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  12. The contest between parsimony and likelihood.Elliott Sober - 2004 - Systematic Biology 53 (4):644-653.
    Maximum Parsimony (MP) and Maximum Likelihood (ML) are two methods for evaluating which phlogenetic tree is best supported by data on the characteristics of leaf objects (which may be species, populations, or individual organisms). MP has been criticized for assuming that evolution proceeds parsimoniously -- that if a lineage begins in state i and ends in state j, the way it got from i to j is by the smallest number of changes. MP has been criticized for needing to assume (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  13.  61
    Six sayings about adaptationism.Elliott Sober - 1998 - In David L. Hull & Michael Ruse (eds.), The philosophy of biology. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 72--86.
    Adaptationism is a doctrine that has meant different things to different people. In this essay, I want to isolate and discuss a reading of adaptationism that makes it a non-trivial empirical thesis about the history of life. I'll take adaptationism to be the following claim: natural selection has been the only important cause of most of the phenotypic traits found in most species. I won't try to determine whether adaptationism, so defined, is true. Rather, my task will be one of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  14. Three differences between deliberation and evolution.Elliott Sober - 1998 - In Peter Danielson (ed.), Modeling rationality, morality, and evolution. New York: Oxford University Press.
    In this paper, I'll explore three contexts in which the heuristic of personification yields the wrong answer. They all come from game theoretic discussion of altruism and the Prisoner's Dilemma. Whether it is applied to evolution or to rational deliberation, game theory models situations that involve frequency dependence. In the evolutionary case, how fit a trait is, and whether it is more or less fit than the alternatives, depends on the composition of the population (Maynard Smith 1982). In the case (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  15. Contemporary social theory: an introduction.Anthony Elliott - 2009 - New York: Routledge.
    Preface to second edition -- The textures of society -- The contemporary relevance of the classics -- The frankfurt school -- Structuralism -- Post-structuralism -- Theories of structuration -- Contemporary critical theory -- Feminism and post-feminist theory -- Postmodernity -- Networks, risks, liquids -- Globalization -- Afterword.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  16.  9
    Profiles in contemporary social theory.Anthony Elliott & Bryan S. Turner (eds.) - 2001 - Thousand Oaks, Calif.: SAGE.
    This is an indispensible book for students, teachers and professional researchers in sociology, cultural studies, politics, feminism and philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  17. Coincidences and how to reason about them.Elliott Sober - 2012 - In Henk W. De Regt, Stephan Hartmann & Samir Okasha (eds.), EPSA Philosophy of Science: Amsterdam 2009. Springer. pp. 355-374.
    The naïve see causal connections everywhere. Consider the fact that Evelyn Marie Adams won the New Jersey lottery twice. The naïve find it irresistible to think that this cannot be a coincidence. Maybe the lottery was rigged or perhaps some uncanny higher power placed its hand upon her brow. Sophisticates respond with an indulgent smile and ask the naïve to view Adams’ double win within a larger perspective. Given all the lotteries there have been, it isn’t at all surprising that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  18.  52
    What is a Person? Evidence on Mind Perceptions from Natural Language.Elliott Ash, Dominik Stammbach & Kevin Tobia - manuscript
    Recent psychology research has established that people do not employ a simple unidimensional scale for attributions of personhood, increasing from non-sentient rocks to mentally complex humans. Rather, there are two personhood dimensions: agency (e.g. planning, deciding, acting) and experience (e.g. feeling, desiring, experiencing). Here we show that this subtle distinction also occurs in the semantic space of natural language. We develop computational-linguistics tools for measuring variation in agency and experience in language and validate the measures against human judgments. To demonstrate (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  22
    Roles for Socially Engaged Philosophy of Science in Environmental Policy.Kevin C. Elliott - unknown - In David Boonin, Katrina L. Sifferd, Tyler K. Fagan, Valerie Gray Hardcastle, Michael Huemer, Daniel Wodak, Derk Pereboom, Stephen J. Morse, Sarah Tyson, Mark Zelcer, Garrett VanPelt, Devin Casey, Philip E. Devine, David K. Chan, Maarten Boudry, Christopher Freiman, Hrishikesh Joshi, Shelley Wilcox, Jason Brennan, Eric Wiland, Ryan Muldoon, Mark Alfano, Philip Robichaud, Kevin Timpe, David Livingstone Smith, Francis J. Beckwith, Dan Hooley, Russell Blackford, John Corvino, Corey McCall, Dan Demetriou, Ajume Wingo, Michael Shermer, Ole Martin Moen, Aksel Braanen Sterri, Teresa Blankmeyer Burke, Jeppe von Platz, John Thrasher, Mary Hawkesworth, William MacAskill, Daniel Halliday, Janine O’Flynn, Yoaav Isaacs, Jason Iuliano, Claire Pickard, Arvin M. Gouw, Tina Rulli, Justin Caouette, Allen Habib, Brian D. Earp, Andrew Vierra, Subrena E. Smith, Danielle M. Wenner, Lisa Diependaele, Sigrid Sterckx, G. Owen Schaefer, Markus K. Labude, Harisan Unais Nasir, Udo Schuklenk, Benjamin Zolf & Woolwine (eds.), The Palgrave Handbook of Philosophy and Public Policy. Springer Verlag. pp. 767-778.
    In recent years, philosophers of science have taken renewed interest in pursuing scholarship that is “socially engaged.” As a result, this scholarship has become increasingly relevant to public policy. In order to illustrate the ways in which the philosophy of science can inform public policy, this chapter focuses specifically on environmental research and policy. It shows how philosophy can assist with environmental policy making in three ways: clarifying the roles of values in policy-relevant science; addressing scientific dissent, especially in response (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  20. Critical Levels, Critical Ranges, and Imprecise Exchange Rates in Population Axiology.Elliott Thornley - 2022 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 22 (3):382–414.
    According to Critical-Level Views in population axiology, an extra life improves a population only if that life’s welfare exceeds some fixed ‘critical level.’ An extra life at the critical level leaves the new population equally good as the original. According to Critical-Range Views, an extra life improves a population only if that life’s welfare exceeds some fixed ‘critical range.’ An extra life within the critical range leaves the new population incommensurable with the original. -/- In this paper, I sharpen some (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  21. Deterministic Chaos and the Evolution of Meaning.Elliott O. Wagner - 2012 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 63 (3):547-575.
    Common wisdom holds that communication is impossible when messages are costless and communicators have totally opposed interests. This article demonstrates that such wisdom is false. Non-convergent dynamics can sustain partial information transfer even in a zero-sum signalling game. In particular, I investigate a signalling game in which messages are free, the state-act payoffs resemble rock–paper–scissors, and senders and receivers adjust their strategies according to the replicator dynamic. This system exhibits Hamiltonian chaos and trajectories do not converge to equilibria. This persistent (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  22. Research on Fair Trade Consumption—A Review.Veronika A. Andorfer & Ulf Liebe - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 106 (4):415-435.
    An overview and assessment of the current state of research on individual consumption of Fair Trade (FT) products is given on the basis of 51 journal publications. Arranging this field of ethical consumption research according to key research objectives, theoretical approaches, methods, and study population, the review suggests that most studies apply social psychological approaches focusing mainly on consumer attitudes. Fewer studies draw on economic approaches focusing on consumers’ willingness to pay ethical premia for FT products or sociological approaches relying (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  23. Force and disposition in evolutionary theory.Elliott Sober - 1984 - In Christopher Hookway (ed.), Minds, Machines, and Evolution: Philosophical Studies. Cambridge University Press.
  24. A dilemma for lexical and Archimedean views in population axiology.Elliott Thornley - 2022 - Economics and Philosophy 38 (3):395-415.
    Lexical views in population axiology can avoid the Repugnant Conclusion without violating Transitivity or Separability. However, they imply a dilemma: either some good life is better than any number of slightly worse lives, or else the ‘at least as good as’ relation on populations is radically incomplete. In this paper, I argue that Archimedean views face an analogous dilemma. I thus conclude that the lexical dilemma gives us little reason to prefer Archimedean views. Even if we give up on lexicality, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  25.  8
    The double-edged helix: genetic engineering in the real world.Liebe F. Cavalieri - 1981 - New York: Praeger.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  3
    The double-edged helix: science in the real world.Liebe F. Cavalieri - 1981 - New York: Columbia University Press.
  27.  32
    Benjamin for architects.Brian Elliott - 2011 - New York: Routledge.
    This is a concise, coherent account of the relevance of Walter Benjamin "s writings to architects, locating Benjamin "s critical work within the context of ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28. Does Your Patient Have A Beetle in His Box? Language Games and Psychopathology.Carl Elliott - 2003 - In Cressida J. Heyes (ed.), The grammar of politics: Wittgenstein and political philosophy. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. The impossibility of a satisfactory population prospect axiology (independently of Finite Fine-Grainedness).Elliott Thornley - 2021 - Philosophical Studies 178 (11):3671-3695.
    Arrhenius’s impossibility theorems purport to demonstrate that no population axiology can satisfy each of a small number of intuitively compelling adequacy conditions. However, it has recently been pointed out that each theorem depends on a dubious assumption: Finite Fine-Grainedness. This assumption states that there exists a finite sequence of slight welfare differences between any two welfare levels. Denying Finite Fine-Grainedness makes room for a lexical population axiology which satisfies all of the compelling adequacy conditions in each theorem. Therefore, Arrhenius’s theorems (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  30.  15
    Drinking termination: Interactions among hydrational, orogastric, and behavioral controls in rats.Elliott M. Blass & Warren G. Hall - 1976 - Psychological Review 83 (5):356-374.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  31. Hypotheses that attribute false beliefs: A two‐part epistemology.William Roche & Elliott Sober - 2020 - Mind and Language 36 (5):664-682.
    Is there some general reason to expect organisms that have beliefs to have false beliefs? And after you observe that an organism occasionally occupies a given neural state that you think encodes a perceptual belief, how do you evaluate hypotheses about the semantic content that that state has, where some of those hypotheses attribute beliefs that are sometimes false while others attribute beliefs that are always true? To address the first of these questions, we discuss evolution by natural selection and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32.  83
    Ethics in the first person: a guide to teaching and learning practical ethics.Deni Elliott - 2007 - Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Practical ethics in context -- Teaching and learning ethics in an ethical environment -- Aspirations, activities, and assessment -- The theoretical toolkit -- Systematic case analysis -- Relativism and moral development -- A bridge across cultures.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  33. The rules of insanity: Commentary on: Psychopathic disorder: A category mistake?Elliott Carl - 1991 - Journal of Medical Ethics 17.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  27
    The aim of this chapter is to help readers understand their responsibilities as persons and as journalists, and to provide them with a framework for addressing the ethical issues that routinely arise in the practice of journalism. Our approach, which is informed by the basic tenets of Western ethical tradi-tions and which borrows from Ozar's and Elliott's previous works, develops from the abstract to the concrete. 1 That is, we move from a discussion of the purpose of journalism, and the specific values ... [REVIEW]Deni Elliott - 2010 - In Christopher Meyers (ed.), Journalism ethics: a philosophical approach. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 9.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  12
    Newtonian gravitation in Maxwell spacetime.Elliott D. Chen - 2023 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 102 (C):22-30.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36. Introduction to mathematical logic.Elliott Mendelson - 1964 - Princeton, N.J.,: Van Nostrand.
    The Fourth Edition of this long-established text retains all the key features of the previous editions, covering the basic topics of a solid first course in ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   189 citations  
  37. Critical-Set Views, Biographical Identity, and the Long Term.Elliott Thornley - forthcoming - Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
    Critical-set views avoid the Repugnant Conclusion by subtracting some constant from the welfare score of each life in a population. These views are thus sensitive to facts about biographical identity: identity between lives. In this paper, I argue that questions of biographical identity give us reason to reject critical-set views and embrace the total view. I end with a practical implication. If we shift our credences towards the total view, we should also shift our efforts towards ensuring that humanity survives (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. The Shutdown Problem: An AI Engineering Puzzle for Decision Theorists.Elliott Thornley - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies.
    I explain the shutdown problem: the problem of designing artificial agents that (1) shut down when a shutdown button is pressed, (2) don’t try to prevent or cause the pressing of the shutdown button, and (3) otherwise pursue goals competently. I prove three theorems that make the difficulty precise. These theorems show that agents satisfying some innocuous-seeming conditions will often try to prevent or cause the pressing of the shutdown button, even in cases where it’s costly to do so. And (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. The Shutdown Problem: Incomplete Preferences as a Solution.Elliott Thornley - manuscript
    I explain and motivate the shutdown problem: the problem of creating artificial agents that (1) shut down when a shutdown button is pressed, (2) don’t try to prevent or cause the pressing of the shutdown button, and (3) otherwise pursue goals competently. I then propose a solution: train agents to have incomplete preferences. Specifically, I propose that we train agents to lack a preference between every pair of different-length trajectories. I suggest a way to train such agents using reinforcement learning: (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  60
    Six problems with pharma-funded bioethics.Carl Elliott - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 35 (1):125-129.
  41.  56
    Conventional Semantic Meaning in Signalling Games with Conflicting Interests.Elliott O. Wagner - 2015 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 66 (4):751-773.
    Lewis signalling games are often used to explain how it is possible for simple agents to develop systems of conventional semantic meaning. In these games, all players obtain identical payoffs in every outcome. This is an unrealistic payoff structure, but it is often employed because it is thought that semantic meaning will not emerge if interests conflict. Here it is shown that not only is conventional meaning possible when interests conflict, but it is the most likely outcome in a finite (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  42. A Non-Identity Dilemma for Person-Affecting Views.Elliott Thornley - manuscript
    Person-affecting views in population ethics state that (in cases where all else is equal) we’re permitted but not required to create people who would enjoy good lives. In this paper, I present an argument against every possible variety of person-affecting view. The argument takes the form of a dilemma. Narrow person-affecting views must embrace at least one of three implausible verdicts in a case that I call ‘Expanded Non-Identity.’ Wide person-affecting views run into trouble in a case that I call (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  49
    Agent-Based Models of Dual-Use Research Restrictions.Elliott Wagner & Jonathan Herington - 2021 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 72 (2):377-399.
    Scientific research that could cause grave harm, either through accident or intentional malevolence, is known as dual-use research. Recent high-profile cases of dual-use research in the life sciences have led to debate about the extent to which restrictions on the conduct and dissemination of such research may impede scientific progress. We adapt formal models of scientific networks to systematically explore the effects that different regulatory schemes may have on a community’s ability to learn about the world. Our results suggest that, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  44.  35
    Aesthetics in a multicultural age.Emory Elliott, Louis Freitas Caton & Jeffrey Rhyne (eds.) - 2002 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Aesthetics in a Multicultural Age examines a variety of significant multidisciplinary and multicultural topics within the subject of aesthetics. Addressing the vexed relation of the arts and criticism to current political and cultural concerns, the contributors to this volume attempt to bridge the two decades-old gap between scholars and critics who hold conflicting views of the purposes of art and criticism. By exploring some of the ways in which global migration and expanding ethnic diversity are affecting cultural productions and prompting (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45. Sexualities, social theory and the crisis of identity.A. Elliott - 2001 - In Barry Smart & George Ritzer (eds.), Handbook of social theory. Thousands Oaks, Calif.: SAGE. pp. 428--38.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  56
    The life and behavior of living organisms: a general theory.Elliott Jaques - 2002 - Westport, Conn.: Praeger.
    Jaques provides a general theory that gives a dynamic scientific foundation for the understanding of all living behavior.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  58
    Communication and Structured Correlation.Elliott Wagner - 2009 - Erkenntnis 71 (3):377-393.
    Philosophers and social scientists have recently turned to Lewis sender–receiver games to provide an account of how lexical terms can acquire meaning through an evolutionary process. However, the evolution of meaning is contingent on both the particular sender–receiver game played and the choice of evolutionary dynamic. In this paper I explore some differences between models that presume an infinitely large and randomly mixed population and models in which a finite number of agents communicate with their neighbors in a social network. (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  48.  29
    Actual Human Persons Are Sexed, Unified Beings.Elliott Louis Bedford & Jason T. Eberl - 2017 - Ethics and Medics 42 (10):1-3.
    Recently, Edward Furton commented on an article that we published in Health Care Ethics USA concerning the philosophical and theological anthropology informing the discussion of appropriate care for individuals with gender dysphoria and intersex conditions. We appreciate the opportunity to clarify the points we made in that article, particularly the metaphysical mechanics underlying our contention that, as part of a unified human person, the human rational soul is sexed. We hope this more in-depth metaphysical explanation shows that Furton’s concern, while (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  49.  69
    Evolving to Divide the Fruits of Cooperation.Elliott O. Wagner - 2012 - Philosophy of Science 79 (1):81-94.
    Cooperation and the allocation of common resources are core features of social behavior. Games idealizing both interactions have been studied separately. But here, rather than examining the dynamics of the individual games, the interactions are combined so that players first choose whether to cooperate, and then, if they jointly cooperate, they bargain over the fruits of their cooperation. It is shown that the dynamics of the combined game cannot simply be reduced to the dynamics of the individual games and that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  50. How Much Should Governments Pay to Prevent Catastrophes? Longtermism's Limited Role.Carl Shulman & Elliott Thornley - forthcoming - In Jacob Barrett, Hilary Greaves & David Thorstad (eds.), Essays on Longtermism. Oxford University Press.
    Longtermists have argued that humanity should significantly increase its efforts to prevent catastrophes like nuclear wars, pandemics, and AI disasters. But one prominent longtermist argument overshoots this conclusion: the argument also implies that humanity should reduce the risk of existential catastrophe even at extreme cost to the present generation. This overshoot means that democratic governments cannot use the longtermist argument to guide their catastrophe policy. In this paper, we show that the case for preventing catastrophe does not depend on longtermism. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000