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  1.  10
    An Integrative Model of the Influence of Parental and Peer Support on Consumer Ethical Beliefs: The Mediating Role of Self-Esteem, Power, and Materialism.Elodie Gentina, L. J. Shrum, Tina M. Lowrey, Scott J. Vitell & Gregory M. Rose - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (4):1173-1186.
    What causes adolescents to develop consumer’ ethical beliefs? Prior research has largely focused on the negative influence of peers and negative patterns of parent–child interactions to explain risky and unethical consumer behaviors. We take a different perspective by focusing on the positive support of parents and peers in adolescent social development. An integrative model is developed that links parental and peer support with adolescents’ self-worth motives, their materialistic tendencies, and their consumer ethical beliefs. In a study of 984 adolescents, we (...)
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  2.  28
    Does Bad Company Corrupt Good Morals? Social Bonding and Academic Cheating Among French and Chinese Teens.Elodie Gentina, Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Qinxuan Gu - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (3):639-667.
    A well-known common wisdom asserts that strong social bonds undermine delinquency. However, there is little empirical evidence to substantiate this assertion regarding adolescence academic cheating across cultures. In this study, we adopt social bonding theory and develop a theoretical model involving four social bonds and adolescence self-reported academic cheating behavior and cheating perception. Based on 913 adolescents in France and China, we show that parental attachment, academic commitment, and moral values curb academic cheating; counterintuitively, peer involvement contributes to cheating. We (...)
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  3.  8
    Ethics During Adolescence: A Social Networks Perspective.Elodie Gentina, Gregory M. Rose & Scott J. Vitell - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (1):185-197.
    Marketing research on adolescents’ ethical predispositions and risky behaviors has focused primarily on individual difference variables. The present study, in contrast, examines the social network positions that an adolescent occupies within a group. A survey of 984 adolescents demonstrates that EP and RB stem from a balance between assimilation and individuation. In particular, we show that adolescents with close first-degree relationships within a specific peer group and/or high need for uniqueness have lower EP and engage in more RB, while adolescents (...)
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  4.  10
    Do Parents and Peers Influence Adolescents’ Monetary Intelligence and Consumer Ethics? French and Chinese Adolescents and Behavioral Economics.Elodie Gentina, Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Qinxuan Gu - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (1):115-140.
    Adolescents have increasing discretionary income, expenditures, and purchasing power. Inventory shrinkage costs $123.4 billion globally to retail outlets. Adolescents are disproportionately responsible for theft and shoplifting. Both parents and peers significantly influence adolescents’ monetary values, materialism, and dishonesty as consumers. In this study, we develop a theoretical model involving teenagers’ social attachment and their consumer ethics, treat adolescents’ money attitude in the context of youth materialism as a mediator, and simultaneously examine the direct and indirect paths. Results of 1018 adolescents (...)
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  5.  4
    Coping with Loneliness Through Materialism: Strategies Matter for Adolescent Development of Unethical Behaviors.Elodie Gentina, L. J. Shrum & Tina M. Lowrey - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (1):103-122.
    Engaging in unethical consumption behaviors is an acute societal problem that can have severe consequences for adolescents, and businesses in particular have been accused of making such consumption particularly appealing and accessible. However, the causes of unethical behaviors are not well understood and research on the causes has been mixed. In this research, we investigate the effects of coping strategies for loneliness on adolescents’ adoption of unethical behaviors, a topic that business ethics research has not explored. In a large-scale study (...)
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