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  1.  17
    A Comparative Study of Chinese, American and Japanese Nurses' Perceptions of Ethical Role Responsibilities.Samantha Mei-che Pang, Aiko Sawada, Emiko Konishi, Douglas P. Olsen, Philip Lh Yu, Moon-fai Chan & Naoya Mayumi - 2003 - Nursing Ethics 10 (3):295-311.
    This article reports a survey of nurses in different cultural settings to reveal their perceptions of ethical role responsibilities relevant to nursing practice. Drawing on the Confucian theory of ethics, the first section attempts to understand nursing ethics in the context of multiple role relationships. The second section reports the administration of the Role Responsibilities Questionnaire (RRQ) to a sample of nurses in China (n = 413), the USA (n = 163), and Japan (n = 667). Multidimensional preference analysis revealed (...)
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  2.  4
    Whistleblowing in Japan.Anne J. Davis & Emiko Konishi - 2007 - Nursing Ethics 14 (2):194-202.
    This article, written from research data, focuses on the possible meaning of the data rather than on detailed statistical reporting. It defines whistleblowing as an act of the international nursing ethical ideal of advocacy, and places it in the larger context of professional responsibility. The experiences, actions, and ethical positions of 24 Japanese nurses regarding whistleblowing or reporting a colleague for wrongdoing provide the data. Of these respondents, similar in age, educational level and clinical experience, 10 had previously reported another (...)
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  3.  12
    A Pilot Study of Selected Japanese Nurses' Ideas on Patient Advocacy.Anne J. Davis, Emiko Konishi & Marie Tashiro - 2003 - Nursing Ethics 10 (4):404-413.
    This pilot study had two purposes: (1) to review recent Japanese nursing literature on nursing advocacy; and (2) to obtain data from nurses on advocacy. For the second purpose, 24 nurses at a nursing college in Japan responded to a questionnaire. The concept of advocacy, taken from the West, has become an ethical ideal for Japanese nurses but one that they do not always understand, or, if they do, they find it difficult to fulfil. They cite nursing leadership support as (...)
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  4.  5
    Ethical Issues After the Disclosure of a Terminal Illness: Danish and Norwegian Hospice Nurses' Reflections.Margarethe Lorensen, Anne J. Davis, Emiko Konishi & Eli H. Bunch - 2003 - Nursing Ethics 10 (2):175-185.
    This research explored the ethical issues that nurses reported in the process of elaboration and further disclosure after an initial diagnosis of a terminal illness had been given. One hundred and six hospice nurses in Norway and Denmark completed a questionnaire containing 45 items of forced-choice and open-ended questions. This questionnaire was tested and used in three countries prior to this study; for this research it was tested on Danish and Norwegian nurses. All respondents supported the ethics of ongoing disclosure (...)
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  5.  4
    The Ethics of Withdrawing Artificial Food and Fluid From Terminally Ill Patients: An End-of-Life Dilemma for Japanese Nurses and Families.Emiko Konishi, Anne J. Davis & Toshiaki Aiba - 2002 - Nursing Ethics 9 (1):7-19.
    End-of-life issues have become an urgent problem in Japan, where people are among the longest lived in the world and most of them die while connected to high-technology medical equipment. This study examines a sensitive end-of-life ethical issue that concerns patients, families and nurses: the withdrawal of artificial food and fluid from terminally ill patients. A sample of 160 Japanese nurses, who completed a questionnaire that included forced-choice and open-ended questions, supported this act under only two specific conditions: if the (...)
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  6.  14
    Questions of Distributive Justice: Public Health Nurses' Perceptions of Long-Term Care Insurance for Elderly Japanese People.Lou Ellen Barnes, Kiyomi Asahara, Anne J. Davis & Emiko Konishi - 2002 - Nursing Ethics 9 (1):67-79.
    This study examines public health nurses’ perceptions and concerns about the implications of Japan’s new long-term care insurance law concerning care provision for elderly people and their families. Respondents voiced their primary concern about this law as access to services for all elderly people needing care, and defined their major responsibility as strengthening health promotion and illness prevention programmes. Although wanting to expand their roles to meet the health care, social and public policy advocacy needs of elderly persons and their (...)
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  7.  8
    A Comparative Study of Chinese, American and Japanese Nurses' Perceptions of Ethical Role Responsibilities.Samantha Mei-che Pang, Aiko Sawada, Emiko Konishi, Douglas P. Olsen, L. H. Philip, Moon-fai Chan & Naoya Mayumi - 2003 - Nursing Ethics 10 (3):295-311.
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