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  1.  14
    Human progress by human effort: neo-Darwinism, social heredity, and the professionalization of the American social sciences, 1889–1925.Emilie J. Raymer - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (4):63.
    Prior to August Weismann’s 1889 germ-plasm theory, social reformers believed that humans could inherit the effects of a salubrious environment and, by passing environmentally-induced modifications to their offspring, achieve continuous progress. Weismann’s theory disrupted this logic and caused many to fear that they had little control over human development. As numerous historians have observed, this contributed to the birth of the eugenics movement. However, through an examination of the work of social scientists Lester Frank Ward, Richard T. Ely, Amos Griswold (...)
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    A Man of His Time: Thorstein Veblen and the University of Chicago Darwinists. [REVIEW]Emilie J. Raymer - 2013 - Journal of the History of Biology 46 (4):669-698.
    The Darwinian economic theory that Thorstein Veblen proposed and refined while he served as a professor of Political Economy at the University of Chicago from 1891 to 1906 should be assessed in the context of the community of Darwinian scientists and social scientists with whom Veblen worked and lived at Chicago. It is important to identify Veblen as a member of this broad community of Darwinian-inclined philosophers, physiologists, geologists, astronomers, and biologists at Chicago because Veblen’s involvement with this circle suggests (...)
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    Darwin and Women: A Selection of Letters.Emilie J. Raymer - 2018 - Annals of Science 75 (1):66-67.
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