10 found
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  1.  22
    Responsibility as Responsiveness: Enacting a Dispositional Ethics of Encounter.Emily Beausoleil - 2017 - Political Theory 45 (3):291-318.
    With the normative demand to attend to social difference and an absence of universal evaluative terms with which to do so, recent theory has increasingly turned to the study of the affective rather than epistemological conditions of ethical encounter. This I call a “dispositional ethics” that construes responsibility as responsiveness. Recent articulations of such an ethics, notably in the most current work of Judith Butler, James Tully, Jade Larissa Schiff, and Ella Myers, highlight its connection to situated practices of concrete (...)
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  2.  10
    “Gather Your People”: Learning to Listen Intergenerationally in Settler-Indigenous Politics.Emily Beausoleil - 2020 - Political Theory 48 (6):665-691.
    Decolonization requires critical attention to settler logics that reinforce settler-colonialism, yet settler communities, as a rule, operate without a collective sense of identity and history. This article, provoked by Māori protocols of encounter, explores the necessity of developing a sense of collective identity as precursor to meeting in settler-Indigenous politics. It argues that the ability, desire, and experience of being unmarked as a social group—apparent in paradigmatic approaches to engaging social difference in settler communities—is at the heart of the particularity (...)
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  3.  13
    Mastery of Knowledge or Meeting of Subjects? The Epistemic Effects of Two Forms of Political Voice.Emily Beausoleil - 2016 - Contemporary Political Theory 15 (1):16-37.
  4.  16
    Listening obliquely: Listening as norm and strategy for structural justice.Emily Beausoleil - 2021 - Contemporary Political Theory 20 (1):23-47.
    Long histories and entrenched habits of inattention among advantaged groups mean that even minor challenge and concession can provoke subjective perceptions of victimization. How, in such conditions, might claims of structural injustice break through? Drawing on field work with practitioners across conflict mediation, therapy, education, and performance – four sectors that facilitate listening in fraught contexts yet are undertheorized in politics – this article makes the case that among the most overlooked and powerful resources for cultivating receptivity and responsiveness among (...)
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  5.  18
    Listening to Claims of Structural Injustice.Emily Beausoleil - 2019 - Angelaki 24 (4):120-135.
    Listening appears as elusive as it is crucial to democratic life, particularly in conditions of structural injustice. Dominant groups benefit from histories and habits of inattention and, when enlisted, common responses of denial, defensiveness, and resentment. What lies behind this pervasive and persistent failure to listen to claims of structural injustice by more advantaged groups, and what does this mean for democratic engagement? This paper addresses this question via three interventions: first, it develops a novel account of listening that reveals (...)
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  6.  11
    The Politics, Science, and Art of Receptivity.Emily Beausoleil - 2014 - Ethics and Global Politics 7 (1):19-40.
    With so much attention on the issue of voice in democratic theory, the inverse question of how people come to listen remains a marginal one. Recent scholarship in affect and neuroscience reveals that cognitive and verbal strategies, while privileged in democratic politics, are often insufficient to cultivate the receptivity that constitutes the most basic premise of democratic encounters. This article draws on this scholarship and a recent case of forum theatre to examine the conditions of receptivity and responsiveness, and identify (...)
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  7.  10
    ‘Only They Breathe’: Identity, Agency and the Dancing Body Politic.Emily Beausoleil - 2014 - Constellations 21 (1):111-133.
  8.  21
    Eating Anxiety: The Perils of Food Politics.Emily Beausoleil - 2015 - Contemporary Political Theory 14 (1):e26-e30.
  9.  1
    Book Review: In the Street: Democratic Action, Theatricality, and Political Friendship, by Çiğdem Çidam. [REVIEW]Emily Beausoleil - forthcoming - Political Theory:009059172211175.
  10.  14
    The Political Space of Art: The Dardenne Brothers, Arundhati Roy, Ai Weiwei, and Burial.Emily Beausoleil - 2017 - Contemporary Political Theory 16 (3):409-412.