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  1.  26
    Scaling Up Alternative Food Networks: Farmers' Markets and the Role of Clustering in Western Canada. [REVIEW]Mary A. Beckie, Emily Huddart Kennedy & Hannah Wittman - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (3):333-345.
    Farmers’ markets, often structured as non-profit or cooperative organizations, play a prominent role in emerging alternative food networks of western Canada. The contribution of these social economy organizations to network development may relate, in part, to the process of regional clustering. In this study we explore the nature and significance of farmers’ market clustering in the western Canadian provinces of British Columbia and Alberta, focusing on the possible connection between clustering and a “scaling up” of alternative food networks. Survey and (...)
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    Is There an “Ideal Feeder”? How Healthy and Eco-Friendly Food Consumption Choices Impact Judgments of Parents.Emily Huddart Kennedy & Julie A. Kmec - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (1):137-151.
    On top of working longer hours in paid employment and spending more time actively caring for children, parents, especially mothers, also feel pressured to safeguard the health of their children and the planet through their food consumption choices. Surprisingly, little evidence identifies whether the health value and environmental impact of food consumption choices impact judgments of parents’ abilities, morality, or general worth. We address this gap by drawing on an experiment administered to an online convenience sample of the United States (...)
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    Scaling Up Alternative Food Networks: Farmers' Markets and the Role of Regional Clustering in Western Canada.Mary A. Beckie, Emily Huddart Kennedy & Hannah Wittman - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (3):333-345.
    Farmers’ markets, often structured as non-profit or cooperative organizations, play a prominent role in emerging alternative food networks of western Canada. The contribution of these social economy organizations to network development may relate, in part, to the process of regional clustering. In this study we explore the nature and significance of farmers’ market clustering in the western Canadian provinces of British Columbia and Alberta, focusing on the possible connection between clustering and a “scaling up” of alternative food networks. Survey and (...)
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