Results for 'Emily K. Leiker'

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  1.  22
    The Effect of Dopaminergic Replacement Therapy on Creative Thinking and Insight Problem-Solving in Parkinson's Disease Patients.Carola Salvi, Emily K. Leiker, Beatrix Baricca, Maria A. Molinari, Roberto Eleopra, Paolo F. Nichelli, Jordan Grafman & Joseph E. Dunsmoor - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Parkinson's disease patients receiving dopaminergic treatment may experience bursts of creativity. Although this phenomenon is sometimes recognized among patients and their clinicians, the association between dopamine replacement therapy in PD patients and creativity remains underexplored. It is unclear, for instance, whether DRT affects creativity through convergent or divergent thinking, idea generation, or a general lack of inhibition. It is also unclear whether DRT only augments pre-existing creative attributes or generates creativity de novo. Here, we tested a group of PD patients (...)
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  2.  10
    Examining moral injury in clinical practice: A narrative literature review.Emily K. Mewborn, Marianne L. Fingerhood, Linda Johanson & Victoria Hughes - 2023 - Nursing Ethics 30 (7-8):960-974.
    Healthcare workers experience moral injury (MI), a violation of their moral code due to circumstances beyond their control. MI threatens the healthcare workforce in all settings and leads to medical errors, depression/anxiety, and personal and occupational dysfunction, significantly affecting job satisfaction and retention. This article aims to differentiate concepts and define causes surrounding MI in healthcare. A narrative literature review was performed using SCOPUS, CINAHL, and PubMed for peer-reviewed journal articles published in English between 2017 and 2023. Search terms included (...)
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  3.  12
    Adult Daughters and Care for the Elderly.Emily K. Abel - 1986 - Feminist Studies 12 (3):479.
  4.  10
    Contagion and Confinement: Controlling Tuberculosis along the Skid Road. Barron H. Lerner.Emily K. Abel - 2001 - Isis 92 (3):634-635.
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  5.  13
    Neurodevelopmental Disorders Across the Lifespan: A Neuroconstructivist Approach.Emily K. Farran & Annette Karmiloff-Smith (eds.) - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    This book is unique in presenting evidence on development across the lifespan across multiple levels of description. The authors use a well-defined disorder - Williams syndrome, to explore the impact of genes, brain development, behaviour, as well as the individual's environment on development.
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  6.  4
    Being and Listening in Solution: Water Ethics, Holy Waters, and Wet Ontologies.Emily K. Amedée - 2021 - Listening 56 (2):167-174.
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  7.  22
    Modeling Man: The Monkey Colony at the Carnegie Institution of Washington’s Department of Embryology, 1925–1971.Emily K. Wilson - 2012 - Journal of the History of Biology 45 (2):213-251.
    Though better recognized for its immediate endeavors in human embryo research, the Carnegie Department of Embryology also employed a breeding colony of rhesus macaques for the purposes of studying human reproduction. This essay follows the course of the first enterprise in maintaining a primate colony for laboratory research and the overlapping scientific, social, and political circumstances that tolerated and cultivated the colony’s continued operation from 1925 until 1971. Despite a new-found priority for reproductive sciences in the United States, by the (...)
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  8.  14
    Nostalgia strengthens global self-continuity through holistic thinking.Emily K. Hong, Constantine Sedikides & Tim Wildschut - 2021 - Cognition and Emotion 35 (4):730-737.
    The sociologist Fred Davis (1979) was the first to propose that nostalgic reverie plays a role in connecting temporally distinct aspects of the self. His proposal has stood the test of time. Yet, t...
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  9.  41
    Surprised by Disability.Emily K. Michael - 2013 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 3 (3):207-210.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Surprised by DisabilityEmily K. MichaelToday I am meeting Diana, one of my young blind students, for coffee. Soon she will enroll in our summer program that teaches blind teenagers independent living skills and self–advocacy. Her teachers explain that she has prepared questions for me.“So,” Diana begins, as we follow the uneven sidewalk toward the restaurant. “What would you do if you wanted to go outside without your sunglasses?”I can (...)
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  10.  30
    Cross-Domain Associations Between Motor Ability, Independent Exploration, and Large-Scale Spatial Navigation; Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Williams Syndrome, and Typical Development.Emily K. Farran, Aislinn Bowler, Annette Karmiloff-Smith, Hana D’Souza, Leighanne Mayall & Elisabeth L. Hill - 2019 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 13.
  11.  34
    Enhancement versus Therapy in Catholic Neuroethics.Emily K. Trancik - 2015 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 15 (1):63-72.
    This article explores the way the distinction between enhancement and therapy has been used in Catholic bioethics to assess the moral character of technologies that developments in genetics and neuroscience have made possible. The purpose of drawing lines between therapy and enhancement is typically to claim that the former is always ethically justified and the latter is morally suspect, if not altogether impermissible. The author connects the enhancement versus therapy distinction to concepts of human nature that ground it and examines (...)
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  12.  6
    Darren F. Speece, Defending Giants: The Redwood Wars and the Transformation of American Environmental Politics.Emily K. Brock - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (1):109-110.
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  13.  27
    Lost in Translation: Spiritual Assessment and the Religious Tradition.Emily K. Trancik - 2013 - Christian Bioethics 19 (3):282-298.
  14.  8
    Are Older Adults Less Embodied? A Review of Age Effects through the Lens of Embodied Cognition.Matthew C. Costello & Emily K. Bloesch - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  15.  15
    The politics of knowledge: implications for understanding and addressing mental health and illness.Emily K. Jenkins - 2014 - Nursing Inquiry 21 (1):3-10.
    While knowledge represents a valuable commodity, not all forms of knowledge are afforded equal status. The politics of knowledge, which entails the privileging of particular ways of knowing through linkages between the producers of knowledge and other bearers of authority or influence, represents a powerful force driving knowledge development. Within the health research and practice community, biomedical knowledge (i.e. knowledge pertaining to the biological factors influencing health) has been afforded a privileged position, shaping the health research and practice community's view (...)
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  16.  20
    Modeling Man: The Monkey Colony at the Carnegie Institution of Washington’s Department of Embryology, 1925–1971. [REVIEW]Emily K. Wilson - 2012 - Journal of the History of Biology 45 (2):213 - 251.
    Though better recognized for its immediate endeavors in human embryo research, the Carnegie Department of Embryology also employed a breeding colony of rhesus macaques for the purposes of studying human reproduction. This essay follows the course of the first enterprise in maintaining a primate colony for laboratory research and the overlapping scientific, social, and political circumstances that tolerated and cultivated the colony's continued operation from 1925 until 1971. Despite a new-found priority for reproductive sciences in the United States, by the (...)
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  17.  63
    Cultural group selection plays an essential role in explaining human cooperation: A sketch of the evidence.Peter Richerson, Ryan Baldini, Adrian V. Bell, Kathryn Demps, Karl Frost, Vicken Hillis, Sarah Mathew, Emily K. Newton, Nicole Naar, Lesley Newson, Cody Ross, Paul E. Smaldino, Timothy M. Waring & Matthew Zefferman - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39:e30.
    Human cooperation is highly unusual. We live in large groups composed mostly of non-relatives. Evolutionists have proposed a number of explanations for this pattern, including cultural group selection and extensions of more general processes such as reciprocity, kin selection, and multi-level selection acting on genes. Evolutionary processes are consilient; they affect several different empirical domains, such as patterns of behavior and the proximal drivers of that behavior. In this target article, we sketch the evidence from five domains that bear on (...)
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  18.  29
    Sequential egocentric navigation and reliance on landmarks in Williams syndrome and typical development.Hannah J. Broadbent, Emily K. Farran & Andrew Tolmie - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  19.  15
    Fertility Preservation for a Teenager with Differences (Disorders) of Sex Development: An Ethics Case Study.Courtney Finlayson, Emilie K. Johnson, Arlene B. Baratz, Diane Chen & Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2019 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 30 (2):143-153.
    Fertility preservation has become more common for various populations, including oncology patients, transgender individuals, and women who are concerned about age-related infertility. Little attention has been paid to fertility preservation for patients with differences/disorders of sex development (DSD). Our goal in this article is to address specific ethical considerations that are unique to this patient population. To this end, we present a hypothetical DSD case. We then explore ethical considerations related to patient’s age, risk of cancer, concern about genetic transmission (...)
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  20.  33
    Teaching as an exaptation.Paul E. Smaldino & Emily K. Newton - 2015 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  21.  10
    Kevin C. Armitage. The Nature Study Movement: The Forgotten Popularizer of America's Conservation Ethic. viii + 291 pp., index. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2009. $34.95. [REVIEW]Emily K. Brock - 2010 - Isis 101 (4):890-891.
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  22.  3
    Book Review: Hegemonic Masculinity: Formulation, Reformulation, and Amplification by James W. Messerschmidt. [REVIEW]Emily K. Carian - 2019 - Gender and Society 33 (2):327-329.
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  23.  35
    Assessing the Spirit.Jeffrey P. Bishop & Emily K. Trancik - 2013 - Christian Bioethics 19 (3):247-250.
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  24.  20
    Ambient Images.Sean Cubitt, Celia Lury, Scott McQuire, Nikos Papastergiadis, Daniel Palmer, Jasmin Pfefferkorn & Emilie K. Sunde - 2021 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 30 (61-62):68-77.
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  25.  37
    Cultural group selection follows Darwin's classic syllogism for the operation of selection.Peter Richerson, Ryan Baldini, Adrian V. Bell, Kathryn Demps, Karl Frost, Vicken Hillis, Sarah Mathew, Emily K. Newton, Nicole Naar, Lesley Newson, Cody Ross, Paul E. Smaldino, Timothy M. Waring & Matthew Zefferman - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
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  26.  13
    Applying a 'stages of change' model to enhance a traditional evaluation of a research transfer course.Leslie L. Buckley, Paula Goering, Sagar V. Parikh, Dale Butterill & Emily K. H. Foo - 2003 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 9 (4):385-390.
  27.  28
    Developmental changes in the critical information used for facial expression processing.Louise Ewing, Annette Karmiloff-Smith, Emily K. Farran & Marie L. Smith - 2017 - Cognition 166 (C):56-66.
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  28.  17
    Meditation alters representations of peripersonal space: Evidence from auditory evoked potentials.Viet Han H. Nguyen, Shannon B. Palmer, Jacob S. Aday, Christopher C. Davoli & Emily K. Bloesch - 2020 - Consciousness and Cognition 83:102978.
  29.  26
    Encouraging 5-year olds to attend to landmarks: a way to improve children's wayfinding strategies in a virtual environment.Jamie Lingwood, Mark Blades, Emily K. Farran, Yannick Courbois & Danielle Matthews - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6:125566.
    Wayfinding is defined as the ability to learn and remember a route through an environment. Previous researchers have shown that young children have difficulties remembering routes. However, very few researchers have considered how to improve young children's wayfinding abilities. Therefore, we investigated ways to help children increase their wayfinding skills. In two studies, a total of 72 5-year olds were shown a route in a six turn maze in a virtual environment and were then asked to retrace this route by (...)
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  30.  17
    Social Cognition in Williams Syndrome: Genotype/Phenotype Insights from Partial Deletion Patients.Annette Karmiloff-Smith, Hannah Broadbent, Emily K. Farran, Elena Longhi, Dean D’Souza, Kay Metcalfe, May Tassabehji, Rachel Wu, Atsushi Senju, Francesca Happé, Peter Turnpenny & Francis Sansbury - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  31.  92
    Young Children Intuitively Divide Before They Recognize the Division Symbol.Emily Szkudlarek, Haobai Zhang, Nicholas K. DeWind & Elizabeth M. Brannon - 2022 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 16.
    Children bring intuitive arithmetic knowledge to the classroom before formal instruction in mathematics begins. For example, children can use their number sense to add, subtract, compare ratios, and even perform scaling operations that increase or decrease a set of dots by a factor of 2 or 4. However, it is currently unknown whether children can engage in a true division operation before formal mathematical instruction. Here we examined the ability of 6- to 9-year-old children and college students to perform symbolic (...)
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  32.  9
    When People Facing Dementia Choose to Hasten Death: The Landscape of Current Ethical, Legal, Medical, and Social Considerations in the United States.Emily A. Largent, Jane Lowers, Thaddeus Mason Pope, Timothy E. Quill & Matthew K. Wynia - 2024 - Hastings Center Report 54 (S1):11-21.
    Some individuals facing dementia contemplate hastening their own death: weighing the possibility of living longer with dementia against the alternative of dying sooner but avoiding the later stages of cognitive and functional impairment. This weighing resonates with an ethical and legal consensus in the United States that individuals can voluntarily choose to forgo life‐sustaining interventions and also that medical professionals can support these choices even when they will result in an earlier death. For these reasons, whether and how a terminally (...)
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  33.  59
    Emotional Coregulation in Close Relationships.Emily A. Butler & Ashley K. Randall - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (2):1754073912451630.
    Coregulation refers to the process by which relationship partners form a dyadic emotional system involving an oscillating pattern of affective arousal and dampening that dynamically maintains an optimal emotional state. Coregulation may represent an important form of interpersonal emotion regulation, but confusion exists in the literature due to a lack of precision in the usage of the term. We propose an operational definition for coregulation as a bidirectional linkage of oscillating emotional channels between partners, which contributes to emotional stability for (...)
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  34.  36
    Improving informed consent: Stakeholder views.Emily E. Anderson, Susan B. Newman & Alicia K. Matthews - 2017 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 8 (3):178-188.
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  35.  12
    The Gendered “Nature” of the Urban Outdoors: Women Negotiating Fear of Violence.Emily Gaarder & Jennifer K. Wesely - 2004 - Gender and Society 18 (5):645-663.
    Women who participate in outdoor recreational activities reap many physical and emotional benefits from their experiences. However, gender-related feelings of objectification, vulnerability, and fear in this space limit women’s participation. In this study, the authors investigate how women pursue their enjoyment of urban outdoor recreation at South Mountain Park in Phoenix, Arizona, despite their perceptions and experiences related to fear of violence. Through surveys and interviews with women who recreate at South Mountain, the authors look at the ways the women (...)
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  36.  4
    The Developmental Gene Hypothesis for Punctuated Equilibrium: Combined Roles of Developmental Regulatory Genes and Transposable Elements.Emily L. Casanova & Miriam K. Konkel - 2020 - Bioessays 42 (2):1900173.
    Theories of the genetics underlying punctuated equilibrium (PE) have been vague to date. Here the developmental gene hypothesis is proposed, which states that: 1) developmental regulatory (DevReg) genes are responsible for the orchestration of metazoan morphogenesis and their extreme conservation and mutation intolerance generates the equilibrium or stasis present throughout much of the fossil record and 2) the accumulation of regulatory elements and recombination within these same genes—often derived from transposable elements—drives punctuated bursts of morphological divergence and speciation across metazoa. (...)
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  37.  42
    Risk of Death or Life-Threatening Injury for Women with Children Not Sired by the Abuser.Emily J. Miner, Todd K. Shackelford, Carolyn Rebecca Block, Valerie G. Starratt & Viviana A. Weekes-Shackelford - 2012 - Human Nature 23 (1):89-97.
    Women who are abused by their male intimate partners incur many costs, ranging in severity from fleeting physical pain to death. Previous research has linked the presence of children sired by a woman’s previous partner to increased risk of woman abuse and to increased risk of femicide. The current research extends this work by securing data from samples of 111 unabused women, 111 less severely abused women, 128 more severely abused women, and 26 victims of intimate partner femicide from the (...)
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  38.  6
    The Neurophysiological Responses of Concussive Impacts: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Studies.Emily Scott, Dawson J. Kidgell, Ashlyn K. Frazer & Alan J. Pearce - 2020 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14.
  39.  5
    Inter-individual variation shapes the human microbiome.Emily F. Wissel & Leigh K. Smith - 2019 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 42.
    The target article suggests inter-individual variability is a weakness of microbiota-gut-brain research, but we discuss why it is actually a strength. We comment on how accounting for individual differences can help researchers systematically understand the observed variance in microbiota composition, interpret null findings, and potentially improve the efficacy of therapeutic treatments in future clinical microbiome research.
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  40.  73
    “Doctor, Would You Prescribe a Pill to Help Me …?” A National Survey of Physicians on Using Medicine for Human Enhancement.Matthew K. Wynia, Emily E. Anderson, Kavita Shah & Timothy D. Hotze - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (1):3 - 13.
    Using medical advances to enhance human athletic, aesthetic, and cognitive performance, rather than to treat disease, has been controversial. Little is known about physicians? experiences, views, and attitudes in this regard. We surveyed a national sample of physicians to determine how often they prescribe enhancements, their views on using medicine for enhancement, and whether they would be willing to prescribe a series of potential interventions that might be considered enhancements. We find that many physicians occasionally prescribe enhancements, but doctors hold (...)
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  41.  26
    Author Reply: Coregulation is a State of a Temporal Interpersonal Emotion System.Emily A. Butler & Ashley K. Randall - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (2):213-214.
    People in an emotional exchange form a temporal interpersonal emotion system (TIES), in which their emotions are interconnected over time (Butler, 2011). These systems can be in various states, defined by the pattern of emotional interconnections. We have defined coregulation as one such state involving coupled dampened oscillations between partners’ emotions that converge on a stable level. Coregulation could be distinguished from other states, such as stress buffering, by comparing statistical models that represent the theoretical distinctions between states. Optimal data (...)
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  42.  13
    Community Engagement in Precision Medicine Research: Organizational Practices and Their Impacts for Equity.Janet K. Shim, Nicole Foti, Emily Vasquez, Stephanie M. Fullerton, Michael Bentz, Melanie Jeske & Sandra Soo-Jin Lee - 2023 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 14 (4):185-196.
    Background In the wake of mandates for biomedical research to increase participation by members of historically underrepresented populations, community engagement (CE) has emerged as a key intervention to help achieve this goal.Methods Using interviews, observations, and document analysis, we examine how stakeholders in precision medicine research understand and seek to put into practice ideas about who to engage, how engagement should be conducted, and what engagement is for.Results We find that ad hoc, opportunistic, and instrumental approaches to CE exacted significant (...)
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  43.  29
    Flirting with the Truth: Derrida's Discourse with'Woman'and Wenches.Ellen K. Feder & Emily Zakin - 1997 - In Ellen K. Feder, Mary C. Rawlinson & Emily Zakin (eds.), Derrida and Feminism: Recasting the Question of Woman. Routledge. pp. 21--51.
  44.  23
    IRB chairs' perspectives on genotype-driven research recruitment.Laura M. Beskow, Emily E. Namey, Patrick R. Miller, Daniel K. Nelson & Alexandra Cooper - 2012 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 34 (3):1.
    Recruiting research participants based on genetic information generated about them in a prior study is a potentially powerful way to study the functional significance of human genetic variation, but it also presents ethical challenges. To inform policy development on this issue, we conducted a survey of U.S. institutional review board chairs concerning the acceptability of recontacting genetic research participants about additional research and their views on the disclosure of individual genetic results as part of recruitment. Our findings suggest there is (...)
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  45.  98
    “Gaze leading”: Initiating simulated joint attention influences eye movements and choice behavior.Andrew P. Bayliss, Emily Murphy, Claire K. Naughtin, Ada Kritikos, Leonhard Schilbach & Stefanie I. Becker - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (1):76.
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  46.  31
    Are precues effective in proactively controlling taboo interference during speech production?Katherine K. White, Lise Abrams, Lisa R. Hsi & Emily C. Watkins - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (8):1625-1636.
    ABSTRACTThis research investigated whether precues engage proactive control to reduce emotional interference during speech production. A picture-word interference task required participants to name target pictures accompanied by taboo, negative, or neutral distractors. Proactive control was manipulated by presenting precues that signalled the type of distractor that would appear on the next trial. Experiment 1 included one block of trials with precues and one without, whereas Experiment 2 mixed precued and uncued trials. Consistent with previous research, picture naming was slowed in (...)
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  47.  17
    IRB chairs' perspectives on genotype-driven research recruitment.Alexandra Cooper Laura M. Beskow, Emily E. Namey, Patrick R. Miller, Daniel K. Nelson - 2012 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 34 (3):1.
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  48.  22
    Advancing independent adolescent consent for participation in HIV prevention research.Seema K. Shah, Susannah M. Allison, Bill G. Kapogiannis, Roberta Black, Liza Dawson & Emily Erbelding - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (7):431-433.
    In many regions around the world, those at highest risk for acquiring HIV are young adults and adolescents. Young men who have sex with men in the USA are the group at greatest risk for HIV acquisition, particularly if they are part of a racial or ethnic minority group.1 Adolescent girls and young women have the highest incidence rates of any demographic subgroup in sub-Saharan Africa.2 To reverse the global AIDS pandemic’s toll on these high-risk groups, it is important to (...)
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  49.  24
    Promoting microtubule assembly: A hypothesis for the functional significance of the + TIP network.Kamlesh K. Gupta, Emily O. Alberico, Inke S. Näthke & Holly V. Goodson - 2014 - Bioessays 36 (9):818-826.
    Regulation of microtubule (MT) dynamics is essential for many cellular processes, but the machinery that controls MT dynamics remains poorly understood. MT plus‐end tracking proteins (+TIPs) are a set of MT‐associated proteins that dynamically track growing MT ends and are uniquely positioned to govern MT dynamics. +TIPs associate with each other in a complex array of inter‐ and intra‐molecular interactions known as the “+TIP network.” Why do so many +TIPs bind to other +TIPs? Typical answers include the ideas that these (...)
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  50.  15
    For whom does education enlighten?: Race, gender, education, and beliefs about social inequality.Else K. Kyyrö & Emily W. Kane - 2001 - Gender and Society 15 (5):710-733.
    Beliefs have the potential to obscure and legitimate, or to challenge, inequalities of gender and race. Through an analysis of the association between education and beliefs about racial and gender inequality, this article explores for whom education is most likely to foster beliefs that challenge social inequality. Data from the 1996 General Social Survey suggest that education tends to have a greater positive impact on rejection of group segregation and rejection of victim-blaming explanations for inequality than it does on recognition (...)
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