Search results for 'Emily Kalah Gade' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  7
    Emily Kalah Gade (2010). Defining the Non-Combatant: How Do We Determine Who is Worthy of Protection in Violent Conflict? Journal of Military Ethics 9 (3):219-242.
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  2.  15
    Emily Kalah Gade (2011). The Child Soldier: The Question of Self-Defense. Journal of Military Ethics 10 (4):323-326.
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  3.  7
    Christian Bn Gade (2011). The Historical Development of the Written Discourses on Ubuntu. South African Journal of Philosophy 30 (3):303-329.
    In this article, I demonstrate that the term ‘ubuntu’ has frequently appeared in writing since at least 1846. I also analyse changes in how ubuntu has been defined in written sources in the period 1846 to 2011. The analysis shows that in written sources published prior to 1950, it appears that ubuntu is always defined as a human quality. At different stages during the second half of the 1900s, some authors began to define ubuntu more broadly: definitions included ubuntu as (...)
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  4.  10
    Cbn Gade (2012). What is Ubuntu ? Different Interpretations Among South Africans of African Descent. South African Journal of Philosophy 31 (3):484-503.
    In this article, I describe and systematize the different answers to the question ‘What is ubuntu?’ that I have been able to identify among South Africans of African descent (SAADs). I show that it is possible to distinguish between two clusters of answers. The answers of the first cluster all define ubuntu as a moral quality of a person, while the answers of the second cluster all define ubuntu as a phenomenon (for instance a philosophy, an ethic, African humanism, or, (...)
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  5.  16
    Christian Bn Gade (2012). What is Ubuntu? Different Interpretations Among South Africans of African Descent. South African Journal of Philosophy 31 (3):484-503.
  6.  11
    Cbn Gade (2011). The Historical Development of the Written Discourses on Ubuntu 1. South African Journal of Philosophy 30 (3):303-329.
    In this article, I demonstrate that the term ‘ ubuntu ’ has frequently appeared in writing since at least 1846. I also analyse changes in how ubuntu has been defined in written sources in the period 1846 to 2011. The analysis shows that in written sources published prior to 1950, it appears that ubuntu is always defined as a human quality. At different stages during the second half of the 1900s, some authors began to define ubuntu more broadly: definitions included (...)
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  7.  3
    Christian Bn Gade (2013). Restorative Justice and the South African Truth and Reconciliation Process. South African Journal of Philosophy 32 (1):10-35.
  8.  3
    Jeffrey M. Perl, Christian B. N. Gade, Rane Willerslev, Lotte Meinert, Beverly Haviland, Nancy Scheper-Hughes, Daniel Grausam, Daniel McKay & Michiko Urita (2015). Introduction: A Caveat on Caveats. Common Knowledge 21 (3):399-405.
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  9.  2
    Christian B. N. Gade, Rane Willerslev & Lotte Meinert (2015). “Half-Trust” and Enmity in Ikland, Northern Uganda. Common Knowledge 21 (3):406-419.
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  10.  2
    Poon Wai Yee Emily (2005). The Cultural Transfer In Legal Translation. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 18 (3-4):307-323.
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  11.  3
    Cbn Gade (2013). Restorative Justice and the South African Truth and Reconciliation Process. South African Journal of Philosophy 32 (1):10-35.
    It has frequently been argued that the post-apartheid Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) was committed to restorative justice (RJ), and that RJ has deep historical roots in African indigenous cultures by virtue of its congruence both with ubuntu and with African indigenous justice systems (AIJS). In this article, I look into the question of what RJ is. I also present the finding that the term ‘restorative justice’ appears only in transcripts of three public TRC hearings, and the hypothesis that the (...)
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  12. A. Largent Emily, G. Miller Franklin & Steven Joffe (2013). A Prescription for Ethical Learning. In Mildred Z. Solomon & Ann Bonham (eds.), Ethical Oversight of Learning Health Care Systems. Wiley-Blackwell
     
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  13. Anna Gade (2007). Islam. In John Corrigan (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Emotion. OUP Usa
     
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  14. Gerhard GÄDE (2002). Der Zumutungscharakter der christlichen Botschaft: Seine Bedeutung für eine Theologie der Religionen. Freiburger Zeitschrift für Philosophie Und Theologie 49 (1-2):166-188.
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  15. G. GÄDE (1991). «Nondum considerasti, quanti ponderis sit peccatum!». Anselmianische Überlegungen zur gegenwärtigen Gnadenlehre. Wissenschaft Und Weisheit 54 (1):3-26.
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  16. Gerhard GÄDE (2006). «Strahl jener Wahrheit, die alle Menschen erleuchtet»: Für eine interioristische Lesart der Konzilserklärung Nostra aetate. Gregorianum 87 (4):727-747.
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  17. Jon Kvist & Herluf Trolles Gade (forthcoming). Changing Social Citizenship–. Nexus.
     
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  18. Ben Kimpel (1981). Emily Dickinson as Philosopher. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  19. Maureen B. Adams (2000). Emily Brontë and Dogs: Transformation Within the Human-Dog Bond. Society and Animals 8 (2):167-181.
    This paper examines the bond between humans and dogs as demonstrated in the life and work of Emily Brontë . The nineteenth century author, publishing under the pseudonym, Ellis Bell, evinced, both in her personal and professional life, the complex range of emotions explicit in the human-dog bond: attachment and companionship to domination and abuse. In Wuthering Heights, Brontë portrays the dog as scapegoat, illustrating the dark side of the bond found in many cultures. Moreover, she writes with awareness (...)
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  20. Gay L. Gullickson (2008). Emily Wilding Davison: Secular Martyr? Social Research: An International Quarterly 75 (2):461-484.
    In 1913, the British suffragette Emily Wilding Davison was killed when she ran onto the race course at Epsom Downs during the running of the Derby. Davison's goals are unclear, but she was immediately hailed as a martyr to the women's cause by her comrades in the Women's Social and Political Union. Others denounced her as a suicidal fanatic. This article evaluates Davison's death by examining the WSPU's emphasis on self-sacrifice, the actions of other women who risked their lives (...)
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  21.  5
    Robert R. Clewis (2016). What's the Big Idea?: On Emily Brady's Sublime. Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):104-118.
    “The sublime is a massive concept,” Emily Brady states in her book’s first sentence. Her lucid study of the sublime should interest scholars from a wide range of disciplines, from environmental philosophy and aesthetics to the history of philosophy, art history, and literary criticism. Although its title refers to modern philosophy, the book examines not only the period typically classified in philosophy as “modern,” but also romanticism and contemporary aesthetics. Brady aims “to reassess, and to some extent reclaim, the (...)
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  22.  34
    Robert Young (2013). 'Debating the Morality and Legality of Medically Assisted Dying'. Critical Notice of Emily Jackson and John Keown, Debating Euthanasia. Oxford: Hart Publishing, 2012. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (1):151-160.
    In this Critical Notice of Emily Jackson and John Keown’s Debating Euthanasia , the respective lines of argument put forward by each contributor are set out and the key debating points identified. Particular consideration is given to the points each contributor makes concerning the sanctity of human life and whether slippery slopes leading from voluntary medically assisted dying to non-voluntary euthanasia would be established if voluntary medically assisted dying were to be legalised. Finally, consideration is given to the positions (...)
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  23.  7
    Joyce Carol Oates (1987). Soul at the White Heat: The Romance of Emily Dickinson's Poetry. Critical Inquiry 13 (4):806-824.
    Emily Dickinson is the most paradoxical of poets: the very poet of paradox. By way of voluminous biographical material, not to mention the extraordinary intimacy of her poetry, it would seem that we know everything about her; yet the common experience of reading her work, particularly if the poems are read sequentially, is that we come away seeming to know nothing. We could recognize her inimitable voice anywhere—in the “prose” of her letters no less than in her poetry—yet it (...)
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  24.  8
    Alisa Gaunder (2011). Win Win's Struggles with the Institutional Transfer of the Emily's List Model to Japan: The Role of Accountability and Policy. Japanese Journal of Political Science 12 (1):75-94.
    This article addresses the complexities of institutional transfer by exploring the case of EMILY's List and WIN WIN, two women's organizations in the US and Japan respectively that seek to increase the number of women in office by providing funds early in candidatescultures of giving’ exist, they do not necessarily preclude the success of an EMILY's List-type organization in Japan. Instead, WIN WIN made significant strategic organizational decisions that have impeded its ability to have a significant impact on (...)
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  25.  5
    Abi Curtis (2013). MUSHROOMING: Resistance and Creativity in Sigmund Freud and Emily Dickinson. Angelaki 18 (2):29 - 44.
    (2013). MUSHROOMING: resistance and creativity in sigmund freud and emily dickinson. Angelaki: Vol. 18, No. 2, pp. 29-44.
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  26.  7
    Emily E. Anderson (2012). Review of Marion Danis, Emily Largent, David Wendler, Sara Chandros Hull, Seema Shah, Joseph Millum, Benjamin Berkman, and Christine Grady,Research Ethics Consultation: A Casebook1. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 12 (10):54-55.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 10, Page 54-55, October 2012.
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  27. Jed Deppman, Marianne Noble & Gary Lee Stonum (eds.) (2013). Emily Dickinson and Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Emily Dickinson's poetry is deeply philosophical. Recognizing that conventional language limited her thought and writing, Dickinson created new poetic forms to pursue the moral and intellectual issues that mattered most to her. This collection situates Dickinson within the rapidly evolving intellectual culture of her time and explores the degree to which her groundbreaking poetry anticipated trends in twentieth-century thought. Essays aim to clarify the ideas at stake in Dickinson's poems by reading them in the context of one or more (...)
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  28. Phyllis Marie Jensen (2015). Artist Emily Carr and the Spirit of the Land: A Jungian Portrait. Routledge.
    Emily Carr, often called Canada’s Van Gogh, was a post-impressionist explorer, artist and writer. In _Artist Emily Carr and the Spirit of the Land_ Phyllis Marie Jensen draws on analytical psychology and the theories of feminism and social constructionism for insights into Carr’s life in the late Victorian period and early twentieth century. Presented in two parts, the book introduces Carr’s émigré English family and childhood on the "edge of nowhere" and her art education in San Francisco, London (...)
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  29. Patrick J. Keane (2008). Emily Dickinson's Approving God: Divine Design and the Problem of Suffering. University of Missouri.
    As much a doubter as a believer, Emily Dickinson often expressed views about God in general—and God with respect to suffering in particular. In many of her poems, she contemplates the question posed by countless theologians and poets before her: how can one reconcile a benevolent deity with evil in the world? Examining Dickinson’s perspectives on the role played by a supposedly omnipotent and all-loving God in a world marked by violence and pain, Patrick Keane initially focuses on her (...)
     
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  30. Robert Krause (2006). Book Review: Doubt: A History: The Great Doubters and Their Legacy of Innovation From Socrates and Jesus to Thomas Jefferson and Emily Dickinson. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 13 (3):328-329.
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  31. John Barton (2013). Book Review: Emily Arndt, Demanding Our Attention: The Hebrew Bible as a Source for Christian Ethics. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 26 (4):507-509.
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  32.  12
    Arthur W. Frank (2004). Emily's Scars: Surgical Shapings, Technoluxe, and Bioethics. Hastings Center Report 34 (2):18-29.
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  33.  61
    Gareth B. Matthews New, Andrew R. Bailey, Sarah Buss, Steven M. Cahn, Howard Caygill, David J. Chalmers, John Christman, Michael Clark, David E. Cooper & Simon Critchley (2002). Books for Review and for Listing Here Should Be Addressed to Emily Zakin, Review Editor, Department of Philosophy, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056. Teaching Philosophy 25 (4):403.
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  34.  3
    Jong-pil Yoon (forthcoming). Was Emily Brown American Empress in Korea? New Content is Available for Journal of the Philosophy of History.
    _ Source: _Page Count 22 This paper investigates the limits and meaning of historical inquiry in light of inferential contextualism that holds as its central tenet that the epistemic status of a proposition depends on the context of the subject. Historical inquiry, the discussion will show, is an epistemic practice that operates under the reliabilist presupposition that beliefs formed through the processes, whose pragmatic utility has been already proven in problem solving situations, may be taken to be rationally justified.As for (...)
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  35.  53
    Anne Dawson (2011). Masterless Mistresses: The New Orleans Ursulines and the Development of a New World Society, 1727–1834. By Emily Clark. Heythrop Journal 52 (5):872-873.
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  36.  32
    Paula Kurth (1929). Emily Dickinson in Her Letters. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 4 (3):430-439.
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  37.  20
    Cyril Bailey (1927). Juno: A Study in Early Roman Religion. By Emily Ledyard Shields, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Latin, Smith College, U.S.A. (Smith College Classical Studies, No. 7.) Pp. Iv+74. Northampton, Massachusetts, May, 1926. 75 Cents. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 41 (01):43-.
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  38.  7
    William E. May (2012). Debating Euthanasia by Emily Jackson and John Keown. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 12 (4):758-764.
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  39.  35
    Lewis Leary (1956). The Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 31 (2):286-290.
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  40.  12
    Greg Johnson (1982). Emily Dickinson. Renascence 35 (1):2-15.
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  41. Mary Domski (2006). Construction Without Spatial Constraints: A Reply to Emily Carson. Locke Studies 6:85-99.
  42.  14
    William Pencak (1996). Emily Dickinson. Semiotics:13-25.
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  43.  50
    Alan Sokal, Beyond the Hoax : A Response to Emily A. Schultz.
    For the complex or boundary objects in which I am interested . . . dimensions implode . . . they collapse into each other . . . story telling . . . is a fraught practice . . . In no way is story telling opposed to materiality, [sic] But materiality itself is tropic; it makes us swerve, it trips us; it is a knot of the textual, technical, mythic/oneric [sic], organic, political and economic.
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  44.  38
    Seth Lazar (2011). War: Essays in Political Philosophy, Edited by Larry May with Emily Crookston. Mind 120 (479):895-901.
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  45.  18
    A. Souter (1936). Sister Mary Emily Keenan: The Life and Times of St. Augustine as Revealed in His Letters. Pp. Xx + 221. (The Catholic University of America Patristic Studies, Vol. XLV.) Washington, D.C.: The Catholic University of America, 1935. Paper, $2. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (01):39-.
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  46.  7
    Dennis Knepp (2015). Philosophy Through Teaching, Ed. Emily Esch, Kevin Hermberg, Rory E. Kraft, Jr. Teaching Philosophy 38 (3):358-362.
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  47.  39
    Gary Ostertag (2011). Emily Elizabeth Constance Jones. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  48.  15
    John Wilkins (1994). 'That's Another Fine Mess You Got Me Into' Emily Gowers: The Loaded Table: Representations of Food in Roman Literature. Pp. Xii + 334. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993. Cased, £40. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 44 (01):69-71.
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  49.  14
    J. Hainsworth (1997). Review. The Ages of Homer. A Tribute to Emily Townsend Vermeule. JB Carter, SP Morris. The Classical Review 47 (1):4-6.
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  50.  3
    Adam Katz (2015). Suñña at the Bone: Emily Dickinson’s Theravadin Romanticism. Buddhist-Christian Studies 35 (1):111-119.
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