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Emily Nancy Kress [3]Emily Kress [2]
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Emily Kress
Brown University
  1. Aristotle on Chance, Causation, and Teleology.Emily Nancy Kress - 2018 - Dissertation,
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    Aristotle on Spontaneous Generation, Spontaneity, and Natural Processes.Emily Kress - 2020 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 58.
    Aristotle contrasts standard animal generation with ‘spontaneous generation’, which happens when some material putrefies and gives rise to a new organism. This paper addresses two interrelated puzzles about spontaneous generation. First, is it of the same ‘fundamental kind’ of causal process as standard generation? Second, is it ‘spontaneous’, as understood in Physics 2.4–6: rare, accidentally caused, and among things that are for the sake of something? I argue that both puzzles turn on the same questions about the process types involved. (...)
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    How Things Happen for the Sake of Something: The Dialectical Strategy of Aristotle, Physics 2.8.Emily Nancy Kress - 2019 - Phronesis 64 (3):321-347.
    I offer a fresh interpretation of the dialectical strategy of Physics 2.8’s arguments that things in nature happen for the sake of something. Whereas many recent interpreters have concluded that these arguments inevitably beg the question against Aristotle’s opponents, I argue that they constitute a careful attempt to build common ground with an opponent who rejects Aristotle’s basic worldview. This common ground, first articulated in the famous Winter Rain Argument, takes the form of an intriguing pattern of reasoning: that natural (...)
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    Occurrent States and the Problem of Counterfeit Belief in Hume's Treatise.Emily Nancy Kress - 2017 - Hume Studies 43 (1):61-90.
    In his Treatise of Human Nature, Hume defines a belief as "a lively idea related to or associated with a present impression".1 He offers variations on this definition throughout the work, writing, for instance, that "belief is a more vivid and intense conception of an idea, proceeding from its relation to a present impression" and that his "general position" is "that an opinion or belief is nothing but a strong and lively idea deriv'd from a present impression related to it". (...)
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    Review of Devin Henry, "Aristotle on Matter, Form, and Moving Causes: The Hylomorphic Theory of Substantial Generation". [REVIEW]Emily Kress - 2020 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 8.