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Emily R. Grosholz [25]Emily Rolfe Grosholz [2]
  1. Representation and Productive Ambiguity in Mathematics and the Sciences.Emily R. Grosholz - 2006 - Studia Leibnitiana 38 (2):244-246.
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  2.  21
    The partial unification of domains, hybrids, and the growth of mathematical knowledge.Emily R. Grosholz - 2000 - In Emily Grosholz & Herbert Breger (eds.), The growth of mathematical knowledge. Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 81--91.
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  3. Cartesian method and the problem of reduction.Emily R. Grosholz - 1994 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 184 (1):119-121.
     
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  4.  9
    Starry Reckoning: Reference and Analysis in Mathematics and Cosmology.Emily Rolfe Grosholz - 2016 - Cham: Springer Verlag.
    This book deals with a topic that has been largely neglected by philosophers of science to date: the ability to refer and analyze in tandem. On the basis of a set of philosophical case studies involving both problems in number theory and issues concerning time and cosmology from the era of Galileo, Newton and Leibniz up through the present day, the author argues that scientific knowledge is a combination of accurate reference and analytical interpretation. In order to think well, we (...)
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  5. Descartes' unification of algebra and geometry.Emily R. Grosholz - 1980 - In Stephen Gaukroger (ed.), Descartes: Philosophy, Mathematics and Physics. Barnes & Noble. pp. 156--68.
  6.  12
    Two English Translations of Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex.Emily R. Grosholz - 2017 - In Laura Hengehold & Nancy Bauer (eds.), A Companion to Simone de Beauvoir. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 59–70.
    This chapter treats the reception and assessment of the two English translations of Simone de Beauvoir's Le deuxième sexe, the first by Howard M. Parshley in 1953 and the second by Constance Borde and Sheila Malovany‐Chevallier in 2009. We examine both the criticisms and the appreciations, concluding that the second is superior in many ways to the first. On that basis, we propose a digital edition of the original book and its earlier drafts en face the 2009 English translation, which (...)
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  7. The Legacy of Simone de Beauvoir.Emily R. Grosholz - 2005 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 195 (3):384-386.
     
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  8.  8
    A Case Study in the Applioation of Mathematics to Physics: Descartes’ Principles Of Philosophy, Part II.Emily R. Grosholz - 1986 - PSA Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1986 (1):116-124.
    The question of how and why the application of mathematics to physical reality is possible has occupied philosophers for many centuries. In contemporary discussions, Philip Kitcher’s attack on a priorist approaches to the question is particularly interesting, for it suggests that there is no global answer (Kitcher 1983, Chapters 1-4). In this essay, I would like to develop his insight by arguing, first, that the problem of how mathematics relates to physical reality should be addressed by an appeal to the (...)
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  9.  63
    A Case Study in the Application of Mathematics to Physics: Descartes' Principles of Philosophy, Part II.Emily R. Grosholz - 1986 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1986:116 - 124.
    The question of how and why mathematics can be applied to physical reality should be approached through the history of science, as a series of case studies which may reveal both generalizable patterns and salient differences in the grounds and nature of that application from era to era. The present examination of Descartes' Principles of Philosophy Part II, reveals a deep ambiguity in the relation of Euclidean geometry to res extensa, and a tension between geometrical form and 'common motion of (...)
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  10.  23
    Berzelian formulas as generative paper tools.Emily R. Grosholz - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 36 (2):411-417.
  11.  77
    Critical studies/book reviews.Emily R. Grosholz - 2001 - Philosophia Mathematica 9 (2):79-80.
  12. G.W. Leibniz, Interrelations Between Mathematics and Philosophy.Emily R. Grosholz (ed.) - 2015 - Springer Verlag.
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  13.  44
    Geometry, Time and Force in the Diagrams of Descartes, Galileo, Torricelli and Newton.Emily R. Grosholz - 1988 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1988:237 - 248.
    Cartesian method both organizes and impoverishes the domains to which Descartes applies it. It adjusts geometry so that it can be better integrated with algebra, and yet deflects a full-scale investigation of curves. It provides a comprehensive conceptual framework for physics, and yet interferes with the exploitation of its dynamical and temporal aspects. Most significantly, it bars a fuller unification of mathematics and physics, despite Descartes' claims to quantify nature. The work of his contemporaries Galileo and Torricelli, and of his (...)
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  14. How symbolic and iconic languages bridge the two worlds of the chemist: a case study from contemporary bioorganic chemistry.Emily R. Grosholz & Roald Hoffmann - 2012 - In Roald Hoffmann (ed.), Roald Hoffmann on the philosophy, art, and science of chemistry. Oxford University Press.
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  15. Leibniz’s Mathematical and Philosophical Analysis of Time.Emily R. Grosholz - 2015 - In Norma B. Goethe, Philip Beeley & David Rabouin (eds.), G.W. Leibniz, Interrelations Between Mathematics and Philosophy. Springer Verlag.
  16.  9
    On the plains and prairies of Minnesota: The role of mathematical statistics in biological explanation.Emily R. Grosholz - 2021 - Synthese 199 (1-2):5377-5393.
    In this essay, I consider the use of mathematical statistics in the study of biological systems in the field, using as case studies the work of Ruth Geyer Shaw and her colleagues at the University of Minnesota. To address practical issues, like how to enhance prairie restoration, and how to prepare for (and perhaps prevent) the effect of rapid climate change, she and her colleagues combine mathematical modeling and intensive data collection in the field. Using ANOVA and the more versatile (...)
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  17.  21
    Problematic Objects between Mathematics and Mechanics.Emily R. Grosholz - 1990 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:385 - 395.
    The existence of mathematical objects may be explained in terms of their occurrence in problems. Especially interesting problems arise at the overlap of domains, and the items that intervene in them are hybrids sharing the characteristics of both domains in an ambiguous way. Euclid's geometry, and Leibniz' work at the intersection of geometry, algebra and mechanics in the late seventeenth century, provide instructive examples of such problems and items. The complex and yet still formal unity of these items calls into (...)
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  18.  7
    Problematic Objects between Mathematics and Mechanics.Emily R. Grosholz - 1990 - PSA Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990 (2):385-395.
    The relationship between the objects of mathematics and physics has been a recurrent source of philosophical debate. Rationalist philosophers can minimize the distance between mathematical and physical domains by appealing to transcendental categories, but then are left with the problem of where to locate those categories ontologically. Empiricists can locate their objects in the material realm, but then have difficulty explaining certain peculiar “transcendental” features of mathematics like the timelessness of its objects and the unfalsifiability of (at least some of) (...)
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  19. Rene Descartes, Meditations on First Philosophy (1641).Emily R. Grosholz - 2003 - In Jorge J. E. Gracia, Gregory M. Reichberg & Bernard N. Schumacher (eds.), The Classics of Western Philosophy: A Reader's Guide. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 217.
     
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  20.  13
    The Cambridge Companion to Descartes. John Cottingham.Emily R. Grosholz - 1994 - Isis 85 (1):151-152.
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  21.  24
    Theomorphic Expression in Leibniz's "Discourse on Metaphysics".Emily R. Grosholz - 2001 - Studia Leibnitiana 33 (1):4 - 18.
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  22. The House We Never Leave: Childhood, Shelter, and Freedom in the Writings of Beauvoir and Colette.Emily R. Grosholz - 2004 - In The Legacy of Simone de Beauvoir. Clarendon Press.
     
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  23.  83
    The Legacy of Simone de Beauvoir.Emily R. Grosholz (ed.) - 2006 - Clarendon Press.
    This collection of new essays treats the historical, philosophical, and literary dimensions of Simone de Beauvoir's thought, and celebrates the 50th anniversary of her most influential book, The Second Sex. A team of distinguished philosophers and literary critics locate her work in the intellectual and political upheavals that marked Paris in the 1930s and 1940s; analyse her philosophical links to 17th-century rationalism, and to Kant, Hegel, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, Simone Weil, and Heidegger; and study the connections between her philosophical and literary (...)
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  24.  15
    Teaching the Complex Numbers: What History and Philosophy of Mathematics Suggest.Emily R. Grosholz - unknown
    The narrative about the nineteenth century favored by many philosophers of mathematics strongly influenced by either logic or algebra, is that geometric intuition led real and complex analysis astray until Cauchy and Kronecker in one sense and Dedekind in another guided mathematicians out of the labyrinth through the arithmetization of analysis. Yet the use of geometry in most cases in nineteenth century mathematics was not misleading and was often key to important developments. Thus the geometrization of complex numbers was essential (...)
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  25.  60
    Carlo Cellucci. Rethinking Logic: Logic in Relation to Mathematics, Evolution and Method. Dordrecht: Springer, 2013. ISBN: 978-94-007-6090-5 ; 978-94-007-6091-2 . Pp. xv + 389. [REVIEW]Emily R. Grosholz - 2015 - Philosophia Mathematica 23 (1):136-140.
  26.  46
    Chikara Sasaki. Descartes's mathematical thought. Boston studies in the philosophy of science 237. Dordrecht: Kluwer academic publishers, 2003. Pp. XIV + 496. Isbn 1-4020-1746-. [REVIEW]Emily R. Grosholz - 2005 - Philosophia Mathematica 13 (3):337-342.