Results for 'Emily Rosenthal'

991 found
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  1.  42
    Patient Perspectives on the Learning Health System: The Importance of Trust and Shared Decision Making.Maureen Kelley, Cyan James, Stephanie Alessi Kraft, Diane Korngiebel, Isabelle Wijangco, Emily Rosenthal, Steven Joffe, Mildred K. Cho, Benjamin Wilfond & Sandra Soo-Jin Lee - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (9):4-17.
    We conducted focus groups to assess patient attitudes toward research on medical practices in the context of usual care. We found that patients focus on the implications of this research for their relationship with and trust in their physicians. Patients view research on medical practices as separate from usual care, demanding dissemination of information and in most cases, individual consent. Patients expect information about this research to come through their physician, whom they rely on to identify and filter associated risks. (...)
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  2.  22
    EEG-Based Neurocognitive Metrics May Predict Simulated and On-Road Driving Performance in Older Drivers.Greg Rupp, Chris Berka, Amir H. Meghdadi, Marija Stevanović Karić, Marc Casillas, Stephanie Smith, Theodore Rosenthal, Kevin McShea, Emily Sones & Thomas D. Marcotte - 2019 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  3. The Socio-Political Perspectives of Neuroethics: An Approach to Combat the Reproducibility Crisis in Science?Emily Doerksen & Jean-Christophe Boivin - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 13 (1):31-32.
    Dubljević and company’s proposed approach for incorporating a socio-political perspective into neuroethics has clear potential to help mitigate the effects of research ‘hype’ relating to neuroethics. Their approach serves as a social regulation meant to improve the realizability of neuroethics research. Drawing on Dubljević et al. s suggestion, we consider how incorporating a socio-political perspective in other scientific disciplines could help the scientific community as a whole move beyond the infamous ‘reproducibility crisis’ in science. The reproducibility crisis is a concern (...)
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  4. Henry M. Rosenthal, "The Consolation of Philosophy: Hobbes' Secret, Spinoza's Way". [REVIEW]Emily Grosholz - 1990 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 4 (3):283.
     
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  5.  48
    Representation and productive ambiguity in mathematics and the sciences.Emily Grosholz - 2007 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Viewed this way, the texts yield striking examples of language and notation that are irreducibly ambiguous and productive because they are ambiguous.
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  6. Consciousness and Mind.David M. Rosenthal - 2005 - New York: Oxford University Press UK.
    Consciousness and Mind presents David Rosenthal's influential work on the nature of consciousness. Central to that work is Rosenthal's higher-order-thought theory of consciousness, according to which a sensation, thought, or other mental state is conscious if one has a higher-order thought that one is in that state. The first four essays develop various aspects of that theory. The next three essays present Rosenthal's homomorphism theory of mental qualities and qualitative consciousness, and show how that theory fits with (...)
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  7. Explaining consciousness.David M. Rosenthal - 1993 - In David J. Chalmers (ed.), Philosophy of Mind: Contemporary Readings. Oxford University Press. pp. 406--421.
  8. Higher-order Theories of Consciousness.David Rosenthal - 2007 - In Brian P. McLaughlin, Ansgar Beckermann & Sven Walter (eds.), The Oxford handbook of philosophy of mind. New York: Oxford University Press.
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  9.  87
    The inegalitarian ethos: Incentives, respect, and self-respect.Emily McTernan - 2013 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 12 (1):93-111.
    In Cohen’s vision of the just society, there would be no need for unequalizing incentives so as to benefit the least well-off; instead, people would be motivated by an egalitarian ethos to work hard and in the most socially productive jobs. As such, Cohen appears to offer a way to mitigate the trade-off of equality for efficiency that often characterizes theorizing about distributive justice. This article presents an egalitarian challenge to Cohen’s vision of the just society. I argue that a (...)
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  10. Sensory qualities, consciousness, and perception.David M. Rosenthal - 2005 - In Consciousness and Mind. New York: Oxford University Press UK. pp. 175-226.
  11. Explaining Consciousness.David M. Rosenthal - 2002 - In David J. Chalmers (ed.), Philosophy of Mind: Classical and Contemporary Readings. Oxford University Press. pp. 109-131.
  12.  51
    Anne Conway as a Priority Monist: A Reply to Gordon-Roth.Emily Thomas - 2020 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 6 (3):275-284.
    For early modern metaphysician Anne Conway, the world comprises creatures. In some sense, Conway is a monist about creatures: all creatures are one. Yet, as Jessica Gordon-Roth has astutely pointed out, that monism can be understood in very different ways. One might read Conway as an ‘existence pluralist’: creatures are all composed of the same type of substance, but many substances exist. Alternatively, one might read Conway as an ‘existence monist’: there is only one created substance. Gordon-Roth has done the (...)
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  13. Can Epistemic Virtues Help Combat Epistemologies of Ignorance?Emily McWilliams - 2019 - In Stacey Goguen & Benjamin Sherman (eds.), Overcoming Epistemic Injustice: Social and Psychological Perspectives. Rowman & Littlefield.
    Empirical psychology documents widespread evidence of bias in the ways that people select, interpret, and selectively interpret evidence in forming and revising their beliefs. These biases can function to create and perpetuate epistemologies of ignorance. I argue that virtue epistemology can help us explain what goes epistemically wrong in these cases, and can offer positive advice, orienting us toward ways to right it. In particular, I defend the virtue approach from epistemic situationist worries about the empirical plausibility of individual agents' (...)
     
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  14. Exaggerated reports: reply to Block.David Rosenthal - 2011 - Analysis 71 (3):431-437.
  15. How to think about mental qualities.David Rosenthal - 2010 - Philosophical Issues 20 (1):368-393.
    It’s often held that undetectable inversion of mental qualities is, if not possible, at least conceivable. It’s thought to be conceivable that the mental quality your visual states exhibit when you see something red in standard conditions is literally of the same type as the mental quality my visual states exhibit when I see something green in such circumstances. It’s thought, moreover, to be conceivable that such inversion of mental qualities could be wholly undetectable by any third-person means. And since (...)
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  16. Dimensions of Concrete Experience.Sandra B. Rosenthal - 2003 - In Jorge J. E. Gracia, Gregory M. Reichberg & Bernard N. Schumacher (eds.), The Classics of Western Philosophy: A Reader's Guide. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 440.
     
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  17. Renaissance Theories of Body, Soul, and Mind.Emily Michael - 2002 - In John P. Wright & Paul Potter (eds.), Psyche and Soma: Physicians and Metaphysicians on the Mind-Body Problem From Antiquity to Enlightenment. Clarendon Press.
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  18. Rape Myths, Catastrophe, and Credibility.Emily C. R. Tilton - 2022 - Episteme:1-17.
    There is an undeniable tendency to dismiss women’s sexual assault allegations out of hand. However, this tendency is not monolithic—allegations that black men have raped white women are often met with deadly seriousness. I argue that contemporary rape culture is characterized by the interplay between rape myths that minimize rape, and myths that catastrophize rape. Together, these two sets of rape myths distort the epistemic resources that people use when assessing rape allegations. These distortions result in the unjust exoneration of (...)
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  19. Consciousness.David M. Rosenthal - unknown
    One phenomenon pertains roughly to being awake. A person or other creature is conscious when it's awake and mentally responsive to sensory input; otherwise it's unconscious. This kind of consciousness figures most often in everyday discourse.
     
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  20. Evidentialism and belief polarization.Emily C. McWilliams - 2021 - Synthese 198 (8):7165-7196.
    Belief polarization occurs when subjects who disagree about some matter of fact are exposed to a mixed body of evidence that bears on that dispute. While we might expect mutual exposure to common evidence to mitigate disagreement, since the evidence available to subjects comes to consist increasingly of items they have in common, this is not what happens. The subjects’ initial disagreement becomes more pronounced because each person increases confidence in her antecedent belief. Kelly aims to identify the mechanisms that (...)
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  21.  23
    Peirce's pragmatic account of perception: Issues and implications.Sandra Rosenthal - 2004 - In Cheryl Misak (ed.), The Cambridge companion to Peirce. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 193--213.
  22. Varieties of higher-order theory.David Rosenthal - 2004 - In Rocco J. Gennaro (ed.), Higher-Order Theories of Consciousness: An Anthology. John Benjamins.
    A touchstone of much modern theorizing about the mind is the idea, still tac- itly accepted by many, that a state's being mental implies that it's conscious. This view is epitomized in the dictum, put forth by theorists as otherwise di-.
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  23. Thinking that one thinks.David M. Rosenthal - 1997 - In Alex Burri (ed.), Sprache und Denken =. New York: W. de Gruyter.
     
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  24. Dualism.David M. Rosenthal - 1998 - In Edward Craig (ed.), Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Genealogy to Iqbal. Routledge.
    Dualism is the view that mental phenomena are, in some respect, nonphysical. The best-known version is due to Descartes, and holds that the mind is a nonphysical substance. Descartes argued that, because minds have no spatial properties and physical reality is essentially extended in space, minds are wholly nonphysical. Every human being is accordingly a composite of two objects: a physical body, and a nonphysical object that is that human being's mind. On a weaker version of dualism, which contemporary thinkers (...)
     
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  25.  28
    Speculative pragmatism.Sandra B. Rosenthal - 1986 - La Salle, Ill.: Open Court.
    Introduction CLASSICAL American pragmatism represents a historical period in American philosophy, spanning a particular time frame and including the ...
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  26.  62
    Knowledge triumphant: the concept of knowledge in medieval Islam.Franz Rosenthal - 1970 - Leiden: Brill.
    In "Knowledge Triumphant," Franz Rosenthal observes that the Islamic civilization is one that is essentially characterized by knowledge ("'ilm"), for "ilm is ...
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  27. Not What I Agreed To: Content and Consent.Emily C. R. Tilton & Jonathan Ichikawa - 2021 - Ethics 132 (1):127–154.
    Deception sometimes results in nonconsensual sex. A recent body of literature diagnoses such violations as invalidating consent: the agreement is not morally transformative, which is why the sexual contact is a rights violation. We pursue a different explanation for the wrongs in question: there is valid consent, but it is not consent to the sex act that happened. Semantic conventions play a key role in distinguishing deceptions that result in nonconsensual sex (like stealth condom removal) from those that don’t (like (...)
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  28.  78
    The growth of mathematical knowledge.Emily Grosholz & Herbert Breger (eds.) - 2000 - Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    This book draws its inspiration from Hilbert, Wittgenstein, Cavaillès and Lakatos and is designed to reconfigure contemporary philosophy of mathematics by making the growth of knowledge rather than its foundations central to the study of mathematical rationality, and by analyzing the notion of growth in historical as well as logical terms. Not a mere compendium of opinions, it is organised in dialogical forms, with each philosophical thesis answered by one or more historical case studies designed to support, complicate or question (...)
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  29. Heidegger's Alternative History of Time.Emily Stendera Hughes & Marilyn Stendera - 2024 - New York: Routledge. Edited by Marilyn Stendera.
    This book reconstructs Heidegger’s philosophy of time by reading his work with and against a series of key interlocutors that he nominates as being central to his own critical history of time. In doing so, it explains what makes time of such significance for Heidegger and argues that Heidegger can contribute to contemporary debates in the philosophy of time. Time is a central concern for Heidegger, yet his thinking on the subject is fragmented, making it difficult to grasp its depth, (...)
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  30.  15
    Words and values: some leading words and where they lead us.Peggy Rosenthal - 1984 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    This book is a collection of biographical sketches of some of the leading figures of our time, though the figures aren't people but configurations of words.
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  31. Meaninglessness and monotony in pandemic boredom.Emily Hughes - 2023 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences (5):1105-1119.
    Boredom is an affective experience that can involve pervasive feelings of meaninglessness, emptiness, restlessness, frustration, weariness and indifference, as well as the slowing down of time. An increasing focus of research in many disciplines, interest in boredom has been intensified by the recent Covid-19 pandemic, where social distancing measures have induced both a widespread loss of meaning and a significant disturbance of temporal experience. This article explores the philosophical significance of this aversive experience of ‘pandemic boredom.’ Using Heidegger’s work as (...)
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  32.  5
    Turning: reflections on the experience of conversion.Emilie Griffin - 1980 - Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday.
  33.  99
    A new view of mathematical knowledge.Emily Grosholz - 1985 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 36 (1):71-78.
  34.  38
    The philosophy of play.Emily Ryall (ed.) - 2013 - Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge.
    Play is a vital component of the social life and well-being of both children and adults. This book examines the concept of play and considers a variety of the related philosophical issues. It also includes meta-analyses from a range of philosophers and theorists, as well as an exploration of some key applied ethical considerations. The main objective of The Philosophy of Play is to provide a richer understanding of the concept and nature of play and its relation to human life (...)
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  35.  5
    Toward New Directions in Business Ethics: Some Pragmatic Pathways.Sandra B. Rosenthal & Rogene A. Buchholz - 1999 - In Robert Frederick (ed.), A companion to business ethics. Malden, Mass.: Blackwell. pp. 112–127.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Selfhood and community Value The normative‐empirical split Environmental ethics.
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  36.  60
    How apes get into and out of joint actions.Emilie Genty, Raphaela Heesen, Jean-Pascal Guéry, Federico Rossano, Klaus Zuberbühler & Adrian Bangerter - 2020 - Interaction Studies 21 (3):353-386.
    Compared to other animals, humans appear to have a special motivation to share experiences and mental states with others (Clark, 2006; Grice, 1975), which enables them to enter a condition of ‘we’ or shared intentionality (Tomasello & Carpenter, 2005). Shared intentionality has been suggested to be an evolutionary response to unique problems faced in complex joint action coordination (Levinson, 2006; Tomasello, Carpenter, Call, Behne, & Moll, 2005) and to be unique to humans (Tomasello, 2014). The theoretical and empirical bases for (...)
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  37.  25
    How apes get into and out of joint actions : Shared intentionality as an interactional achievement.Emilie Genty, Raphaela Heesen, Jean-Pascal Guéry, Federico Rossano, Klaus Zuberbühler & Adrian Bangerter - 2020 - Interaction Studies 21 (3):353-386.
    Compared to other animals, humans appear to have a special motivation to share experiences and mental states with others (Clark, 2006; Grice, 1975), which enables them to enter a condition of ‘we’ or shared intentionality (Tomasello & Carpenter, 2005). Shared intentionality has been suggested to be an evolutionary response to unique problems faced in complex joint action coordination (Levinson, 2006; Tomasello, Carpenter, Call, Behne, & Moll, 2005) and to be unique to humans (Tomasello, 2014). The theoretical and empirical bases for (...)
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  38. Rogene A. Buchholz. Ethics & GovernanceRethinking Business Ethics A. Pragmatic Approach Sandra B. Rosenthal - 2000 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics 2000.
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  39. Sex, Money, and Feelings: Mandeville’s Dialogue with Sentimental Drama.Laura Rosenthal - 2015 - In Edmundo Balsemão Pires & Joaquim Braga (eds.), Bernard de Mandeville's Tropology of Paradoxes: Morals, Politics, Economics, and Therapy. Berlin/New York: Springer International Publishing.
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  40. The Herb: Hashish Versus Medieval Muslim Society.Rosenthal - 1971 - Brill.
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  41.  87
    Ter inleiding.Irena Rosenthal - 2006 - Krisis 7 (3):24-27.
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  42. The logical reconstruction of experience : Dewey and Lewis.Sandra Rosenthal - 2002 - In F. Thomas Burke, D. Micah Hester & Robert B. Talisse (eds.), Dewey's logical theory: new studies and interpretations. Nashville: Vanderbilt University Press. pp. 72--92.
     
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  43. Intentionality.David M. Rosenthal - 1986 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 10 (1):151-184.
    At the level of our platitudinous background knowledge about things, speech is the expression of thought. And understanding what such expressing involves is central to understanding the relation between thinking and speaking. Part of what it is for a speech act to express a mental state is that the speech act accurately captures the mental state and can convey to others what mental state it is. And for this to occur, the speech act at least must have propositional content that (...)
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  44. Detachment in Buddhist Ethics: Apatheia, Ataraxia, and Equanimity.Emily McRae - 2018 - In Gordon F. Davis (ed.), Ethics Without Self, Dharma Without Atman: Western and Buddhist Philosophical Traditions in Dialogue. Cham: Springer Verlag.
    Both Stoic and Buddhist ethics are deeply concerned with the ethical dangers of attachments. Three dangers stand out: (1) the destructive consequences of overwhelming emotionality, brought on by attachment, both for oneself and others, (2) the dangers to one's agency posed by strongly held, but ultimately unstable, attachments, and (3) the threat to virtuous emotional engagement with others caused by one's own attachment to them. The first two kinds of moral dangers have informed Stoic models of detachment (see Wong (2006). (...)
     
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  45.  18
    Theorie.Emilie Gomart - 2005 - Krisis 6 (4):95-100.
  46. Baruch Spinoza.Michael A. Rosenthal - 2009 - In Graham Oppy & Nick Trakakis (eds.), Medieval Philosophy of Religion: The History of Western Philosophy of Religion, Volume 2. Routledge. pp. 3--141.
     
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  47.  26
    Consciousness and Its Expression.David M. Rosenthal - 1998 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 22 (1):294-309.
  48. Tolerance as a Virtue in Spinoza's Ethics.Michael A. Rosenthal - 2001 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (4):535-557.
  49.  65
    Res Cogitans: An Essay in Rational Psychology. [REVIEW]David M. Rosenthal - 1976 - Journal of Philosophy 73 (9):240-252.
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  50. Laws of Nature as Constraints.Emily Adlam - 2022 - Foundations of Physics 52 (1):1-41.
    The laws of nature have come a long way since the time of Newton: quantum mechanics and relativity have given us good reasons to take seriously the possibility of laws which may be non-local, atemporal, ‘all-at-once,’ retrocausal, or in some other way not well-suited to the standard dynamical time evolution paradigm. Laws of this kind can be accommodated within a Humean approach to lawhood, but many extant non-Humean approaches face significant challenges when we try to apply them to laws outside (...)
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