Results for 'Emily Soh'

992 found
Order:
  1.  21
    Emerging Urban Mobility Technologies Through the Lens of Everyday Urban Aesthetics: Case of Self-Driving Vehicle.Miloš N. Mladenović, Sanna Lehtinen, Emily Soh & Karel Martens - 2019 - Essays in Philosophy 20 (2):146-170.
    The goal of this article is to deepen the concept of emerging urban mobility technology. Drawing on philosophical everyday and urban aesthetics, as well as the postphenomenological strand in the philosophy of technology, we explicate the relation between everyday aesthetic experience and urban mobility commoning. Thus, we shed light on the central role of aesthetics for providing depth to the important experiential and value-driven meaning of contemporary urban mobility. We use the example of self-driving vehicle (SDV), as potentially mundane, public, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  2
    Self-Regulation Therapy Increases Frontal Gray Matter in Children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: Evaluation by Voxel-Based Morphometry.Debra W. Soh, Jovanka Skocic, Kelly Nash, Sara Stevens, Gary R. Turner & Joanne Rovet - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  3.  98
    The Ugly Truth: Negative Aesthetics and Environment: Emily Brady.Emily Brady - 2011 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 69:83-99.
    In autumn 2009, BBC television ran a natural history series, ‘Last Chance to See’, with Stephen Fry and wildlife writer and photographer, Mark Carwardine, searching out endangered species. In one episode they retraced the steps Carwardine had taken in the 1980s with Douglas Adams, when they visited Madagascar in search of the aye-aye, a nocturnal lemur. Fry and Carwardine visited an aye-aye in captivity, and upon first setting eyes on the creature they found it rather ugly. After spending an hour (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  21
    Review of Marion Danis, Emily Largent, David Wendler, Sara Chandros Hull, Seema Shah, Joseph Millum, Benjamin Berkman, and Christine Grady, Research Ethics Consultation: A Casebook1. [REVIEW]Emily E. Anderson - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (10):54-55.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 10, Page 54-55, October 2012.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Aesthetics of the Natural Environment.Emily Brady - 2000 - University of Alabama Press.
    Emily Brady provides a systematic account of aesthetics in relation to the natural environment, offering a critical understanding of what aesthetic appreciation ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   45 citations  
  6. The Sublime in Modern Philosophy: Aesthetics, Ethics, and Nature.Emily Brady - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    In The Sublime in Modern Philosophy: Aesthetics, Ethics, and Nature, Emily Brady takes a fresh look at the sublime and shows why it endures as a meaningful concept in contemporary philosophy. In a reassessment of historical approaches, the first part of the book identifies the scope and value of the sublime in eighteenth-century philosophy, nineteenth-century philosophy and Romanticism, and early wilderness aesthetics. The second part examines the sublime's contemporary significance through its relationship to the arts; its position with respect (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  7.  20
    Cognitive Transformation, Dementia, and the Moral Weight of Advance Directives.Emily Walsh - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (8):54-64.
    Dementia patients in the moderate-late stage of the disease can, and often do, express different preferences than they did at the onset of their condition. The received view in the philosophical literature argues that advance directives which prioritize the patient’s preferences at onset ought to be given decisive moral weight in medical decision-making. Clinical practice, on the other hand, favors giving moral weight to the preferences expressed by dementia patients after onset. The purpose of this article is to show that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  8. Understanding From Machine Learning Models.Emily Sullivan - forthcoming - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axz035.
    Simple idealized models seem to provide more understanding than opaque, complex, and hyper-realistic models. However, an increasing number of scientists are going in the opposite direction by utilizing opaque machine learning models to make predictions and draw inferences, suggesting that scientists are opting for models that have less potential for understanding. Are scientists trading understanding for some other epistemic or pragmatic good when they choose a machine learning model? Or are the assumptions behind why minimal models provide understanding misguided? In (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  9.  42
    How Liberal is Liberal Equality?: A Comment on Ronald Dworkin's Tanner Lecture: Emily Sherwin.Emily Sherwin - 1995 - Legal Theory 1 (2):227-250.
    Liberalism is a wonderful theory, but its adherents have a difficult time explaining why. In his Tanner Lecture entitled Foundations of Liberal Equality, Ronald Dworkin proposes to defend liberalism in a new way. Dworkin is not content to view liberalism as a political compromise in which people set aside their personal convictions in the interest of social peace. Instead, he undertakes to make liberal political theory “continuous” with personal ethics, by describing an ethical position that endorses liberalism as a matter (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  8
    Evidence From Mandarin Chinese.Hooi Ling Soh - 2008 - In Susan Rothstein (ed.), Theoretical and Crosslinguistic Approaches to the Semantics of Aspect. John Benjamins. pp. 387.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  5
    Enumerating Minimal Active Metabolic Pathways by Model Generation.Takehide Soh & Katsumi Inoue - 2012 - Transactions of the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence 27 (3):204-212.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  17
    Fathers and Daughters: Paternal Influence Among Korean Women in Politics.Chunghee Sarah Soh - 1993 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 21 (1):53-78.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  7
    Fathers and Daughters: Paternal Influence Among Korean Women in Politics.Chunghee Sarah Soh - 1993 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 21 (1):53-78.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  96
    The Difficulties of Translating Heidegger’s Terminology Into Korean.Kwang-Hie Soh - 2005 - Studia Phaenomenologica 5:179-184.
    In this contribution, I sketch the historical context in which the first Korean translation of Sein und Zeit started and the difficulties faced during the process of translation. The translation took about ten years. It is quite difficult to understand Heidegger’s terms and more difficult to translate them into Korean because they have multiple meanings and nuances. So I translated those terms as literally as I could, but sometimes I had to take liberties. When needed, I explained the literal meaning (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  3
    The Festival in Plato's Cretan City and Modern-Day Malaysia.Andrew Soh - 2004 - Budhi: A Journal of Ideas and Culture 7 (3):129-137.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Absolute Time: Rifts in Early Modern British Metaphysics.Emily Thomas - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    What is time? This is one of the most fundamental questions we can ask. Emily Thomas explores how a new theory of time emerged in the seventeenth century. The 'absolute' theory of time held that it is independent of material bodies or human minds, so even if nothing else existed there would be time.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  17.  14
    The Invention of Madness by Emily Baum: Reply by the Author.Emily Baum - 2020 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 79:101206.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Idealizations and Understanding: Much Ado About Nothing?Emily Sullivan & Kareem Khalifa - 2019 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 97 (4):673-689.
    Because idealizations frequently advance scientific understanding, many claim that falsehoods play an epistemic role. In this paper, we argue that these positions greatly overstate idealiza...
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  19.  31
    Representation and Productive Ambiguity in Mathematics and the Sciences.Emily R. Grosholz - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Viewed this way, the texts yield striking examples of language and notation that are irreducibly ambiguous and productive because they are ambiguous.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  20.  85
    Experiments, Simulations, and Epistemic Privilege.Emily C. Parke - 2014 - Philosophy of Science 81 (4):516-536.
    Experiments are commonly thought to have epistemic privilege over simulations. Two ideas underpin this belief: first, experiments generate greater inferential power than simulations, and second, simulations cannot surprise us the way experiments can. In this article I argue that neither of these claims is true of experiments versus simulations in general. We should give up the common practice of resting in-principle judgments about the epistemic value of cases of scientific inquiry on whether we classify those cases as experiments or simulations, (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  21.  79
    Microaggressions, Equality, and Social Practices.Emily McTernan - 2018 - Journal of Political Philosophy 26 (3):261-281.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  22.  17
    The Content and Focus of the Codes of Ethics of the World's Largest Transnational Corporations.Emily F. Carasco & Jang B. Singh - 2003 - Business and Society Review 108 (1):71-94.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   66 citations  
  23.  64
    Perception and Misperception of Bias in Human Judgment.Emily Pronin - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (1):37-43.
  24.  12
    Objectivity in the Eye of the Beholder: Divergent Perceptions of Bias in Self Versus Others.Emily Pronin, Thomas Gilovich & Lee Ross - 2004 - Psychological Review 111 (3):781-799.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   54 citations  
  25. Misconceptions About Coercion and Undue Influence: Reflections on the Views of Irb Members.Emily Largent, Christine Grady, Franklin G. Miller & Alan Wertheimer - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (9):500-507.
    Payment to recruit research subjects is a common practice but raises ethical concerns relating to the potential for coercion or undue influence. We conducted the first national study of IRB members and human subjects protection professionals to explore attitudes as to whether and why payment of research participants constitutes coercion or undue influence. Upon critical evaluation of the cogency of ethical concerns regarding payment, as reflected in our survey results, we found expansive or inconsistent views about coercion and undue influence (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  26.  24
    Can RESEARCH and CARE Be Ethically Integrated?Emily A. Largent, Steven Joffe & Franklin G. Miller - 2011 - Hastings Center Report 41 (4):37-46.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  27. Universality Caused: The Case of Renormalization Group Explanation.Emily Sullivan - 2019 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 9 (3):36.
    Recently, many have argued that there are certain kinds of abstract mathematical explanations that are noncausal. In particular, the irrelevancy approach suggests that abstracting away irrelevant causal details can leave us with a noncausal explanation. In this paper, I argue that the common example of Renormalization Group explanations of universality used to motivate the irrelevancy approach deserves more critical attention. I argue that the reasons given by those who hold up RG as noncausal do not stand up to critical scrutiny. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  28. Living Alterities: Phenomenology, Embodiment, and Race.Emily S. Lee (ed.) - 2014 - State University of New York Press.
    _Philosophers consider race and racism from the perspective of lived, bodily experience._.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  29. On Emily Paul on Brian Leftow.Matthew James Collier - 2019 - TheoLogica: An International Journal for Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology 3 (2):140-151.
    Emily Paul has recently argued that Brian Leftow’s account of why the import of God’s becoming Incarnate is not temporal but modal fails. She argues that Leftow’s required modal variation is not satisfied. That is, we do not have the required variation across logical space concerning the Incarnation. Paul examines her argument on two possible worlds theories: theistic ersatzism and (what I call) Lewisian theism. She thinks that both possible worlds theories face difficulties. I argue that Paul fails to (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30.  16
    Can You Perceive Ensembles Without Perceiving Individuals?: The Role of Statistical Perception in Determining Whether Awareness Overflows Access.Emily J. Ward, Adam Bear & Brian J. Scholl - 2016 - Cognition 152:78-86.
    Do we see more than we can report? Psychologists and philosophers have been hotly debating this question, in part because both possibilities are supported by suggestive evidence. On one hand, phenomena such as inattentional blindness and change blindness suggest that visual awareness is especially sparse. On the other hand, experiments relating to iconic memory suggest that our in-the-moment awareness of the world is much richer than can be reported. Recent research has attempted to resolve this debate by showing that observers (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  31.  52
    The Epistemic Aims of Education.Emily Robertson - 2009 - In Harvey Siegel (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Education. Oxford University Press. pp. 11--34.
  32.  15
    Developmental Change in Numerical Estimation.Emily B. Slusser, Rachel T. Santiago & Hilary C. Barth - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (1):193.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  33.  57
    Time, Space, and Process in Anne Conway.Emily Thomas - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (5):990-1010.
    ABSTRACTMany scholars have drawn attention to the way that elements of Anne Conway’s system anticipate ideas found in Leibniz. This paper explores the relationship between Conway and Leibniz’s work with regard to time, space, and process. It argues – against existing scholarship – that Conway is not a proto-Leibnizian relationist about time or space, and in fact her views lie much closer to those of Henry More; yet Conway and Leibniz agree on the primacy of process. This exploration advances our (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  34. Understanding: Not Know-How.Emily Sullivan - 2018 - Philosophical Studies 175 (1):221-240.
    There is considerable agreement among epistemologists that certain abilities are constitutive of understanding-why. These abilities include: constructing explanations, drawing conclusions, and answering questions. This agreement has led epistemologists to conclude that understanding is a kind of know-how. However, in this paper, I argue that the abilities constitutive of understanding are the same kind of cognitive abilities that we find in ordinary cases of knowledge-that and not the kind of practical abilities associated with know-how. I argue for this by disambiguating between (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  35.  35
    Emotional Coregulation in Close Relationships.Emily A. Butler & Ashley K. Randall - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (2):1754073912451630.
    Coregulation refers to the process by which relationship partners form a dyadic emotional system involving an oscillating pattern of affective arousal and dampening that dynamically maintains an optimal emotional state. Coregulation may represent an important form of interpersonal emotion regulation, but confusion exists in the literature due to a lack of precision in the usage of the term. We propose an operational definition for coregulation as a bidirectional linkage of oscillating emotional channels between partners, which contributes to emotional stability for (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  36.  86
    The Roots of C. D. Broad’s Growing Block Theory of Time.Emily Thomas - 2019 - Mind 128 (510):527-549.
    The growing block view of time holds that the past and present are real whilst the future is unreal; as future events become present and real, they are added on to the growing block of reality. Surprisingly, given the recent interest in this view, there is very little literature on its origins. This paper explores those origins, and advances two theses. First, I show that although C. D. Broad’s Scientific Thought provides the first defence of the growing block theory, the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  37.  80
    Space, Time, and Samuel Alexander.Emily Thomas - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (3):549-569.
    Super-substantivalism is the thesis that space is identical to matter; it is currently under discussion ? see Sklar (1977, 221?4), Earman (1989, 115?6) and Schaffer (2009) ? in contemporary philosophy of physics and metaphysics. Given this current interest, it is worth investigating the thesis in the history of philosophy. This paper examines the super-substantivalism of Samuel Alexander, an early twentieth century metaphysician primarily associated with (the movement now known as) British Emergentism. Alexander argues that spacetime is ontologically fundamental and it (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  38. Kant on Intuition in Geometry.Emily Carson - 1997 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 27 (4):489 - 512.
    It's well-known that Kant believed that intuition was central to an account of mathematical knowledge. What that role is and how Kant argues for it are, however, still open to debate. There are, broadly speaking, two tendencies in interpreting Kant's account of intuition in mathematics, each emphasizing different aspects of Kant's general doctrine of intuition. On one view, most recently put forward by Michael Friedman, this central role for intuition is a direct result of the limitations of the syllogistic logic (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  39.  27
    Shame in Sport.Emily S. T. Ryall - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (2):129-146.
    ABSTRACTTo date, there has been little philosophical consideration of the concept of shame in sport, yet sport seems to be an environment conducive to the experience of shame due to its public and...
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  40. Imagination and the Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature.Emily Brady - 1998 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56 (2):139-147.
  41. Kant on the Method of Mathematics.Emily Carson - 1999 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (4):629-652.
  42.  19
    Should Fertility Treatment Be State Funded?Emily McTernan - 2015 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 32 (3):227-240.
    Many states offer generous provision of fertility treatment, but this article asks whether and how such state funding can be justified. I argue that, at most, there is limited justification for state funding of fertility treatment as one good among many that could enable citizens to pursue valuable life projects, but not one that should have the privileged access to funding it is currently given. I then consider and reject reasons one might think that fertility treatment has a special claim (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  43. Early Modern Women on Metaphysics.Emily Thomas (ed.) - 2018 - Cambridge University Press.
    The work of women philosophers in the early modern period has traditionally been overlooked, yet their writing on topics such as reality, time, mind and matter holds valuable lessons for our understanding of metaphysics and its history. This volume of new essays explores the work of nine key female figures: Bathsua Makin, Anna Maria van Schurman, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Margaret Cavendish, Anne Conway, Damaris Cudworth Masham, Mary Astell, Catharine Trotter Cockburn, and Émilie Du Châtelet. Investigating issues from eternity to free (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44.  16
    Patient‐Engaged Research: Choosing the “Right” Patients to Avoid Pitfalls.Emily A. Largent, Holly Fernandez Lynch & Matthew S. McCoy - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (5):26-34.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  45.  52
    Beyond Consent in Research.Emily Bell, Eric Racine, Paula Chiasson, Maya Dufourcq-Brana, Laura B. Dunn, Joseph J. Fins, Paul J. Ford, Walter Glannon, Nir Lipsman, Mary Ellen Macdonald, Debra J. H. Mathews & Mary Pat Mcandrews - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (3):361-368.
    Vulnerability is an important criterion to assess the ethical justification of the inclusion of participants in research trials. Currently, vulnerability is often understood as an attribute inherent to a participant by nature of a diagnosed condition. Accordingly, a common ethical concern relates to the participant’s decisionmaking capacity and ability to provide free and informed consent. We propose an expanded view of vulnerability that moves beyond a focus on consent and the intrinsic attributes of participants. We offer specific suggestions for how (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  46.  25
    Approach and Avoidance as Organizing Structures for Motivated Distance Perception.Emily Balcetis - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (2):115-128.
    Emerging demonstrations of the malleability of distance perception in affective situations require an organizing structure. These effects can be predicted by approach and avoidance orientation. Approach reduces perceptions of distance; avoidance exaggerates perceptions of distance. Moreover, hedonic valence, motivational intensity, and perceiver arousal cannot alone serve as organizing principles. Organizing the literature based on approach and avoidance can reconcile seeming inconsistent effects in the literature, and offers these motives as psychological mechanisms by which affective situations predict perceptions of distance. Moreover, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  47.  15
    Responsibility as Responsiveness: Enacting a Dispositional Ethics of Encounter.Emily Beausoleil - 2017 - Political Theory 45 (3):291-318.
    With the normative demand to attend to social difference and an absence of universal evaluative terms with which to do so, recent theory has increasingly turned to the study of the affective rather than epistemological conditions of ethical encounter. This I call a “dispositional ethics” that construes responsibility as responsiveness. Recent articulations of such an ethics, notably in the most current work of Judith Butler, James Tully, Jade Larissa Schiff, and Ella Myers, highlight its connection to situated practices of concrete (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  48.  29
    Justice, Feasibility, and Social Science as It Is.Emily McTernan - 2019 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 22 (1):27-40.
    Political philosophy offers a range of utopian proposals, from open borders to global egalitarianism. Some object that these proposals ought to be constrained by what is feasible, while others insist that what justice demands does not depend on what we can bring about. Currently, this debate is mired in disputes over the fundamental nature of justice and the ultimate purpose of political philosophy. I take a different approach, proposing that we should consider which facts could fill out a feasibility requirement. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  49.  58
    The Growth of Mathematical Knowledge.Emily Grosholz & Herbert Breger (eds.) - 2000 - Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    This book draws its inspiration from Hilbert, Wittgenstein, Cavaillès and Lakatos and is designed to reconfigure contemporary philosophy of mathematics by making the growth of knowledge rather than its foundations central to the study of mathematical rationality, and by analyzing the notion of growth in historical as well as logical terms. Not a mere compendium of opinions, it is organised in dialogical forms, with each philosophical thesis answered by one or more historical case studies designed to support, complicate or question (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  50. Neuroaesthetics and Beyond: New Horizons in Applying the Science of the Brain to the Art of Dance. [REVIEW]Emily S. Cross & Luca F. Ticini - 2012 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (1):5-16.
    Throughout history, dance has maintained a critical presence across all human cultures, defying barriers of class, race, and status. How dance has synergistically co-evolved with humans has fueled a rich debate on the function of art and the essence of aesthetic experience, engaging numerous artists, historians, philosophers, and scientists. While dance shares many features with other art forms, one attribute unique to dance is that it is most commonly expressed with the human body. Because of this, social scientists and neuroscientists (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
1 — 50 / 992