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Emma Cave
Durham University
  1.  16
    Challenging misconceptions about clinical ethics support during COVID-19 and beyond: a legal update and future considerations.Joe Brierley, David Archard & Emma Cave - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (8):549-552.
    The pace of change and, indeed, the sheer number of clinical ethics committees has accelerated during the COVID-19 pandemic. Committees were formed to support healthcare professionals and to operationalise, interpret and compensate for gaps in national and professional guidance. But as the role of clinical ethics support becomes more prominent and visible, it becomes ever more important to address gaps in the support structure and misconceptions as to role and remit. The recent case of Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (...)
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  2.  19
    Clinical ethics support services during the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK: a cross-sectional survey.Mariana Dittborn, Emma Cave & David Archard - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (10):695-701.
    Background Non-adherence to medication is associated with increased risk of relapse in patients with bipolar disorder. Objectives To validate patient-evaluated adherence to medication measured via smartphones against validated adherence questionnaire; and investigate characteristics for adherence to medication measured via smartphones. Methods Patients with BD evaluated adherence to medication daily for 6–9 months via smartphones. The Medication Adherence Rating Scale and the Rogers’ Empowerment questionnaires were filled out. The 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Functional (...)
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  3.  24
    Selecting Treatment Options and Choosing Between them: Delineating Patient and Professional Autonomy in Shared Decision-Making.Emma Cave - 2020 - Health Care Analysis 28 (1):4-24.
    Professional control in the selection of treatment options for patients is changing. In light of social and legal developments emphasising patient choice and autonomy, and restricting medical paternalism and judicial deference, this article examines how far patients and families can demand NHS treatment in England and Wales. It considers situations where the patient is an adult with capacity, an adult lacking capacity and a child. In all three cases, there is judicial support for professional autonomy, but there are also inconsistencies (...)
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  4.  29
    COVID-19 Super-spreaders: Definitional Quandaries and Implications.Emma Cave - 2020 - Asian Bioethics Review 12 (2):235-242.
    Uncertainty around the role ‘super-spreaders’ play in the transmission and escalation of infectious disease is compounded by its broad and vague definition. It is a term that has been much used in relation to COVID-19, particularly in social media. On its widest definition, it refers to a propensity to infect a larger than average number of people. Given the biological, behavioural and environmental variables relevant to infectivity, this might be pertinent to almost any infected individual who is not physically isolated (...)
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  5.  35
    Valid consent to medical treatment.Emma Cave - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (12):e31-e31.
    When consent to medical treatment is described as ‘valid’, it might simply mean that it has a sound basis, or it could mean that it is legally valid. Where the two meanings are regularly interchanged, however, it can lead to aspects of the sound basis or the legal requirements being neglected. This article looks at how the term is used in a range of guidance on consent to treatment and argues for consistency.
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  6.  20
    Milgram and Tuskegee—Paradigm Research Projects in Bioethics.Emma Cave & Søren Holm - 2003 - Health Care Analysis 11 (1):27-40.
    This paper discusses the use of the Milgram obedience experiments and the Tuskegee syphilis study in the bioethical literature. The two studies are presented and a variety of uses of them identified and discussed. It is argued that the use of these studies as paradigms of problematic research relies on a reduction of their complexity. What is discussed is thus often constructions of these studies that are closer to hypothetical examples than to the real studies.
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  7. Maternal responsibility to the child not yet born.Emma Cave & Catherine Stanton - 2015 - In Catherine Stanton, Sarah Devaney, Anne-Maree Farrell & Alexandra Mullock (eds.), Pioneering Healthcare Law: Essays in Honour of Margaret Brazier. Routledge.
     
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  8.  23
    Many thanks to bioethics reviewers.George Agich, Priscilla Anderson, Alice Asby, Dominic Beer, Rebecca Bennett, Alec Bodkin, Stephen Braude, Dan Brock, Gideon Calder & Emma Cave - 2002 - In Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.), Bioethics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 2002.
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  9.  10
    Involving parents in paediatric clinical ethics committee deliberations: a current controversy.David Archard, Emma Cave & Joe Brierley - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (11):733-736.
    In cases where the best interests of the child are disputed or finely balanced, Clinical Ethics Committees (CECs) can provide a valuable source of advice to clinicians and trusts on the pertinent ethical dimensions. Recent judicial cases have criticised the lack of formalised guidance and inconsistency in the involvement of parents in CEC deliberations. In Manchester University NHS FT v Verden [2022], Arbuthnot J set out important procedural guidance as to how parental involvement in CEC deliberations might be managed. She (...)
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  10.  22
    Why we wrote... Medicine, Patients and the Law.Margaret Brazier & Emma Cave - 2008 - Clinical Ethics 3 (4):205-208.
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  11. The Warnock Report on Human Fertilisation and Embryology (1984).Emma Cave - 2023 - In Sara Fovargue & Craig Purshouse (eds.), Leading works in health law and ethics. New York, NY: Routledge.
     
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  12.  10
    Healthcare Professional Standards in Pandemic Conditions: The Duty to Obtain Consent to Treatment.Sarah Devaney, Jose Miola, Emma Cave, Craig Purshouse & Rob Heywood - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (4):789-792.
    In the United Kingdom, the question of how much information is required to be given to patients about the benefits and risks of proposed treatment remains extant. Issues about whether healthcare resources can accommodate extended shared decision-making processes are yet to be resolved. COVID-19 has now stepped into this arena of uncertainty, adding more complexity. U.K. public health responses to the pandemic raise important questions about professional standards regarding how the obtaining and recording of consent might change or be maintained (...)
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