Results for 'Emotion Ontology'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  46
    Annotating Affective Neuroscience Data with the Emotion Ontology.Janna Hastings, Werner Ceusters, Kevin Mulligan & Barry Smith - 2012 - In Third International Conference on Biomedical Ontology. ICBO. pp. 1-5.
    The Emotion Ontology is an ontology covering all aspects of emotional and affective mental functioning. It is being developed following the principles of the OBO Foundry and Ontological Realism. This means that in compiling the ontology, we emphasize the importance of the nature of the entities in reality that the ontology is describing. One of the ways in which realism-based ontologies are being successfully used within biomedical science is in the annotation of scientific research results (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. The Emotion Ontology: Enabling Interdisciplinary Research in the Affective Sciences.Janna Hastings, Werner Ceusters, Barry Smith & Kevin Mulligan - 2011 - In M. Beigl, H. Christiansen, T. Roth-Berghofer, A. Kofod-Petersen, K. R. Coventry & H. R. Schmidtke (eds.), CONTEXT, The Seventh International and Interdisciplinary Conference on Modeling and Using Context. Springer. pp. 119--123.
    Affective science conducts interdisciplinary research into the emotions and other affective phenomena. Currently, such research is hampered by the lack of common definitions of terms used to describe, categorise and report both individual emotional experiences and the results of scientific investigations of such experiences. High quality ontologies provide formal definitions for types of entities in reality and for the relationships between such entities, definitions which can be used to disambiguate and unify data across different disciplines. Heretofore, there has been little (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Dispositions and Processes in the Emotion Ontology.Janna Hastings, Werner Ceusters, Barry Smith & Kevin Mulligan - 2011 - In Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Biomedical Ontology. CEUR Workshop Proceedings. pp. 71-78.
    Affective science conducts interdisciplinary research into the emotions and other affective phenomena. Currently, such research is hampered by the lack of common definitions of te rms used to describe, categorise and report both individual emotional experiences and the results of scientific investigations of such experiences. High quality ontologies provide formal definitions for types of entities in reality and for the relationships between such entities, definitions which can be used to disambiguate and unify data across different disciplines. Heretofore, there has been (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. The Ontology of Emotion.Laird Addis - 1995 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 33 (3):261-78.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  12
    The Musical Representation: Meaning, Ontology, and Emotion.Charles O. Nussbaum - 2007 - Bradford.
    How human musical experience emerges from the audition of organized tones is a riddle of long standing. In "The Musical Representation," Charles Nussbaum offers a philosophical naturalist's solution.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  6.  15
    Emotion and Embodiment: Fragile Ontology.Glen Mazis - 1994 - Peter Lang Press.
  7. Emotion and Embodiment: Fragile Ontology.Glen A. Mazis - 1997 - Human Studies 20 (4):467-471.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  8.  84
    Review of Charles O. Nussbaum, The Musical Representation: Meaning, Ontology, and Emotion[REVIEW]Jenefer Robinson - 2009 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (3).
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  9
    Healing and Feeling: The Clinical Ontology of Emotion.Allyson L. Robichaud - 2003 - Bioethics 17 (1):59–68.
  10.  29
    Nussbaum, Charles O. The Musical Representation: Meaning, Ontology, and Emotion. MIT Press, 2007, Xii + 388 Pp., $40.00 Cloth, $20.00 Paper. [REVIEW]Thomas J. Mulherin - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (3):303-306.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  11
    Beyond Ontology: Ideation, Phenomenology and the Cross Cultural Study of Emotion.Robert Solomon - 1997 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 27 (2&3):289–303.
    In this essay, I want to raise certain questions about the nature of emotions, about the similarities and differences in human psychology , and about the relation of psychological inquiry to ethics . The core of my thesis, which I have argued now for almost twenty-five years, is that emotions are a form of cognition, a matter of “ideas”, or in the current lingo, ideation. David Hume, rather famously, analyzed several “passions”, notably pride, in terms of “impressions” and “ideas”. While (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  12.  38
    The Musical Representation: Meaning, Ontology, and Emotion, by Charles O. Nussbaum.M. de Bellis - 2010 - Mind 119 (473):225-228.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  26
    Emotion and Embodiment Fragile Ontology.Sue L. Cataldi - 1996 - International Studies in Philosophy 28 (4):124-126.
  14.  11
    The Musical Representation: Meaning, Ontology, and Emotion.William A. Everett - 2014 - The European Legacy 19 (7):928-930.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  19
    Charles O. Nussbaum: The Musical Representation—Meaning, Ontology, and Emotion[REVIEW]Jordi Vallverdú - 2013 - Minds and Machines 23 (4):515-517.
  16.  23
    Review of Glen A. Mazis, Emotion and Embodiment: Fragile Ontology[REVIEW]Bruce Wilshire - 1997 - Human Studies 20 (4):467-471.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  7
    Emotion, Reflection and Action in Sartre's Ontology.C. Christopher Rodie - 1974 - Man and World 7 (4):379-393.
  18.  7
    The Celebration of Emotion: Vallabha's Ontology of Affective Experience.Jeffrey R. Timm - 1991 - Philosophy East and West 41 (1):59-75.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  1
    The Ontology of Emotion.Laird Addis - 1995 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 33 (3):261-278.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Charles O. Nussbaum, The Musical Representation: Meaning, Ontology, and Emotion[REVIEW]Christopher Bartel - 2008 - Philosophy in Review 28 (3):212-214.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. The Ontology of Emotion.Hichem Naar & Fabrice Teroni (eds.) - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Emotion and Embodiment: Fragile Ontology.Glen Mazis - 1993 - In . Lang.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  2
    The Musical Representation: Meaning, Ontology, and Emotion.Charles O. Nussbaum - 2012 - Bradford.
    How human musical experience emerges from the audition of organized tones is a riddle of long standing. In _The Musical Representation_, Charles Nussbaum offers a philosophical naturalist's solution. Nussbaum founds his naturalistic theory of musical representation on the collusion between the physics of sound and the organization of the human mind-brain. He argues that important varieties of experience afforded by Western tonal art music since 1650 arise through the feeling of tone, the sense of movement in musical space, cognition, emotional (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Poetry and Emotion: Psychoanalysis and the Ontology of Lyric.W. Salomon - 1998 - Analecta Husserliana 53:109-122.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  94
    The Phenomenological Ontology of Literature.Xiaomang Deng - 2010 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (4):621-630.
    Literary ontology is essentially a phenomenological issue rather than one of epistemology, sociology, or psychology. It is a theory of the phenomenological essence intuited from a sense of beauty, based on the phenomenological ontology of beauty, which puts into brackets the sociohistorical premises and material conditions of aesthetic phenomena. Beauty is the objectified emotion. This is the phenomenological definition of the essence of beauty, which manifests itself on three levels, namely emotion qua selfconsciousness, sense of beauty (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  9
    The Ontology of Emotions.Hichem Naar & Fabrice Teroni (eds.) - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
    The nature of emotion is an important question in several philosophical domains, but little attention has so far been paid to identifying the general ontological category to which emotions belong. Given that they are short-lived, are they events? Since they often have components or stages, are they processes? Or does their close link with behaviour mean they are dispositions? In this volume, leading scholars investigate these basic ontological issues, contributing to current discussions about emotions and paving the way for (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  20
    Emotion Education Without Ontological Commitment?Kristján Kristjánsson - 2010 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 29 (3):259-274.
  28. The Perceptibility of Emotion.Joel Smith - 2018 - In Hichem Naar & Fabrice Teroni (eds.), The Ontology of Emotion. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 130-148.
    I offer an account of the ontology of emotions and their expressions, drawing some morals for the view that we can perceive others' emotions in virtue of seeing their expressions.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  43
    Love as a Disposition.Hichem Naar - forthcoming - In Christopher Grau & Aaron Smuts (eds.), Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Love. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter proposes that the question “What is love?” be given an ontological treatment. Rather than asking whether love can be identified with a familiar mental phenomenon (desire, emotion, etc.), it suggests that we should first ask what kind of phenomenon love is, where a kind should here be understood as the most general category to which a given phenomenon belongs, an inquiry that is largely missing from contemporary discussions about love. After motivating this project, the chapter discusses and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  10
    Sentiments.Hichem Naar - 2018 - In Hichem Naar & Fabrice Teroni (eds.), The Ontology of Emotions. Cambridge University Press.
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  19
    Natural Kinds, Social Constructions, and Ordinary Language: Clarifying the Crisis in the Science of Emotion.Cecilea Mun - 2016 - Journal of Social Ontology 2 (2):247-269.
    I argue for the importance of clarifying the distinction between metaphysical, semantic, and meta-semantic concerns regarding what Emotion is. This allows us to see that those involved in the Scientific Emotion Project and the Folk Emotion Project are in fact involved in the same project – the Science of Emotion. It also helps us understand why questions regarding the natural kind status of Emotion, as well as answers to questions regarding the value of ordinary language (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  23
    Vacillating and Mixed Emotions: A Conceptual-Discursive Perspective on Contemporary Emotion and Cognitive Appraisal Theories Through Examples of Pride.Gavin B. Sullivan & Kenneth T. Strongman - 2003 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 33 (2):203–226.
    Vacillating and mixed emotional experiences are often difficult to explore and understand because they confront the limits of our language's ability to capture private experiences in extreme or abnormal circumstances. In this paper, we build upon remarks by Wittgenstein (1953) to present a conceptual-discursive perspective based on naturalistic examples of individuals vacillating between pride and other emotions. This perspective is used to show how relevant emotion theories contain conceptual errors of the sort identified by Wittgenstein. The “assembled reminders” of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  33.  31
    Brentano, Marty, and Meinong on Emotions and Values.Arkadiusz Chrudzimski - 2009 - In Beatrice Centi & Huemer Wolfgang (eds.), Value and Ontology. Ontos. pp. 12--171.
    At least since Hume we have a serious problem with explaining our moral valuations. Most of us – with notable exception of certain (in)famous esoteric thinkers like Nietzsche or De Sade – share a common intuition that our moral claims are in an important sense objective. We believe that they can be right or wrong; and we believe that if they happen to be right, then they are binding for each human being conducting a similar action in similar circumstances. Now (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  4
    Sound and Notation: Comparative Study on Musical Ontology.So Jeong Park - 2017 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 16 (3):417-430.
    Music is said to consist of melody, rhythm, and harmony. Sound is assumed to be something that automatically follows once musical structure is determined. Sound, which is what actually impinges on our eardrums, has been so long forgotten in the history of musical theory. It is ironic that we do not talk about the music which we hear every day but rather are exclusively concerned about the abstracted structure behind it. This is a legacy of ancient Greek ideas about music, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  5
    Li Zehou's Reconception of the Confucian Ethics of Emotion.Jinhua Jia - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (3):757-786.
    Li Zehou 李澤厚, one of the outstanding contemporary thinkers, coins the term “emotio-rational structure” for his ethical theory. Li emphasizes a balanced and integrated structure of emotion and reason, and the core of this structure is an innovative combination of Kantian rationalism and Confucian ethics. Li admires Immanuel Kant’s rational ontology of ethics, but criticizes his exclusion of human emotion and desire. Li advocates complementing Kantian rationalism with the Confucian ethics of emotion, which he calls “ (...) as substance”. He believes that such a balanced structure of emotion and reason will offer inspiration to a changing world... (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  74
    Emotion and Full Understanding.Charles Starkey - 2008 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (4):425-454.
    Aristotle has famously made the claim that having the right emotion at the right time is an essential part of moral virtue. Why might this be the case? I consider five possible relations between emotion and virtue and argue that an adequate answer to this question involves the epistemic status of emotion, that is, whether the perceptual awareness and hence the understanding of the object of emotion is like or unlike the perceptual awareness of an unemotional (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  37.  15
    What Emotions Really Are (In the Theory of Constructed Emotion).Jeremy Pober - 2018 - Philosophy of Science 85 (4):640-59.
    Recently, Lisa Feldman Barrett and colleagues have introduced the Theory of Constructed Emotions (TCE), in which emotions are constituted by a process of categorizing the self as being in an emotional state. The view, however, has several counterintuitive implications: for instance, a person can have multiple distinct emotions at once. Further, the TCE concludes that emotions are constitutively social phenomena. In this article, I explicate the TCE*, which, while substantially similar to the TCE, makes several distinct claims aimed at avoiding (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Dietrich von Hildebrand.Jean Moritz Müller - forthcoming - In Thomas Szanto & Hilge Landweer (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Phenomenology of Emotion. London, UK: Routledge.
    It is sometimes alleged that the study of emotion and the study of value are currently pursued as relatively autonomous disciplines. As Kevin Mulligan notes, “the philosophy and psychology of emotions pays little attention to the philosophy of value and the latter pays only a little more attention to the former.” (2010b, 475). Arguably, the last decade has seen more of a rapprochement between these two domains than used to be the norm (cf. e.g. Roeser & Todd 2014). But (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  36
    The Magic of the Other: Sartre on Our Relation with Others in Ontology and Experience.Julie Van der Wielen - 2014 - Sartre Studies International 20 (2):58-75.
    Sartre's analysis of intersubjective relations through his concept of the look seems unable to give an account of intersubjectivity. By distinguishing the look as an ontological conflict from our relation with others in experience, we will see that actually intersubjectivity is not incompatible with this theory. Furthermore, we will see that the ontological conflict with the Other always erupts in experience in the form of an emotion, and thus always involves magic, and we will look into what the presence (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Emotion, Affect.Friedo Ricken - 1991 - In Hans Burkhardt & Barry Smith (eds.), Handbook of Metaphysics and Ontology. Philosophia Verlag. pp. 1--237.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Duality and Ontology.Baptiste Le Bihan & James Read - forthcoming - Philosophy Compass.
    A ‘duality’ is a formal mapping between the spaces of solutions of two empirically equivalent theories. In recent times, dualities have been found to be pervasive in string theory and quantum field theory. Naïvely interpreted, duality-related theories appear to make very different ontological claims about the world—differing in e.g. space-time structure, fundamental ontology, and mereological structure. In light of this, duality-related theories raise questions familiar from discussions of underdetermination in the philosophy of science: in the presence of dual theories, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. The Four-Category Ontology: A Metaphysical Foundation for Natural Science.E. J. Lowe - 2007 - Clarendon Press.
    E. J. Lowe, a prominent figure in contemporary metaphysics, sets out and defends his theory of what there is. His four-category ontology is a metaphysical system which recognizes four fundamental categories of beings: substantial and non-substantial particulars and substantial and non-substantial universals. Lowe argues that this system has an explanatory power which is unrivalled by more parsimonious theories and that this counts decisively in its favour. He shows that it provides a powerful explanatory framework for a unified account of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   78 citations  
  43. Truth and Ontology.Trenton Merricks - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Truth and Ontology concludes that some truths do not depend on being in any substantive way at all.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   74 citations  
  44.  51
    The Brain Basis of Emotion: A Meta-Analytic Review.Kristen A. Lindquist, Tor D. Wager, Hedy Kober, Eliza Bliss-Moreau & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):121-143.
    Researchers have wondered how the brain creates emotions since the early days of psychological science. With a surge of studies in affective neuroscience in recent decades, scientists are poised to answer this question. In this target article, we present a meta-analytic summary of the neuroimaging literature on human emotion. We compare the locationist approach (i.e., the hypothesis that discrete emotion categories consistently and specifically correspond to distinct brain regions) with the psychological constructionist approach (i.e., the hypothesis that discrete (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   72 citations  
  45. Ontology (Science).Barry Smith - 2003 - In Carola Eschenbach & Michael Grüninger (eds.), Formal Ontology in Information Systems. Oxford: IOS Press. pp. 21-35.
    Increasingly, in data-intensive areas of the life sciences, experimental results are being described in algorithmically useful ways with the help of ontologies. Such ontologies are authored and maintained by scientists to support the retrieval, integration and analysis of their data. The proposition to be defended here is that ontologies of this type – the Gene Ontology (GO) being the most conspicuous example – are a part of science. Initial evidence for the truth of this proposition (which some will find (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  46. Social Ontology.Brian Epstein - 2018 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Social ontology is the study of the nature and properties of the social world. It is concerned with analyzing the various entities in the world that arise from social interaction. -/- A prominent topic in social ontology is the analysis of social groups. Do social groups exist at all? If so, what sorts of entities are they, and how are they created? Is a social group distinct from the collection of people who are its members, and if so, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  80
    Emotional Experience in the Computational Belief-Desire Theory of Emotion.Rainer Reisenzein - 2009 - Emotion Review 1 (3):214-222.
    Based on the belief that computational modeling (thinking in terms of representation and computations) can help to clarify controversial issues in emotion theory, this article examines emotional experience from the perspective of the Computational Belief–Desire Theory of Emotion (CBDTE), a computational explication of the belief–desire theory of emotion. It is argued that CBDTE provides plausible answers to central explanatory challenges posed by emotional experience, including: the phenomenal quality,intensity and object-directedness of emotional experience, the function of emotional experience (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   18 citations  
  48. Ontology: Towards a New Synthesis.Barry Smith & Chris Welty - 2001 - In Formal Ontology in Information Systems. New York: ACM Press.
    This introduction to the second international conference on Formal Ontology and Information Systems presents a brief history of ontology as a discipline spanning the boundaries of philosophy and information science. We sketch some of the reasons for the growth of ontology in the information science field, and offer a preliminary stocktaking of how the term ‘ontology’ is currently used. We conclude by suggesting some grounds for optimism as concerns the future collaboration between philosophical ontologists and information (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  49. Functions in Basic Formal Ontology.Andrew Spear, Werner Ceusters & Barry Smith - 2016 - Applied Ontology 11 (2):103-128.
    The notion of function is indispensable to our understanding of distinctions such as that between being broken and being in working order (for artifacts) and between being diseased and being healthy (for organisms). A clear account of the ontology of functions and functioning is thus an important desideratum for any top-level ontology intended for application to domains such as engineering or medicine. The benefit of using top-level ontologies in applied ontology can only be realized when each of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  69
    A Plant Disease Extension of the Infectious Disease Ontology.Ramona Walls, Barry Smith, Elser Justin, Goldfain Albert & W. Stevenson Dennis - 2012 - In Proceeedings of the Third International Conference on Biomedical Ontology (CEUR 897). pp. 1-5.
    Plants from a handful of species provide the primary source of food for all people, yet this source is vulnerable to multiple stressors, such as disease, drought, and nutrient deficiency. With rapid population growth and climate uncertainty, the need to produce crops that can tolerate or resist plant stressors is more crucial than ever. Traditional plant breeding methods may not be sufficient to overcome this challenge, and methods such as highOthroughput sequencing and automated scoring of phenotypes can provide significant new (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000