Results for 'End-of-life decision making'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  3
    Ethics Consultation at the End of Life.Guide Decision Making - 2008 - In D. Micah Hester (ed.), Ethics by Committee: A Textbook on Consultation, Organization, and Education for Hospital Ethics Committees. Rowman & Littlefield.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  46
    East Meets West: Cross-Cultural Perspective in End-of-Life Decision Making From Indian and German Viewpoints. [REVIEW]Subrata Chattopadhyay & Alfred Simon - 2008 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (2):165-174.
    Culture creates the context within which individuals experience life and comprehend moral meaning of illness, suffering and death. The ways the patient, family and the physician communicate and make decisions in the end-of-life care are profoundly influenced by culture. What is considered as right or wrong in the healthcare setting may depend on the socio-cultural context. The present article is intended to delve into the cross-cultural perspectives in ethical decision making in the end-of-life scenario. We attempt (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  3.  55
    Schiavo on the Cutting Edge: Functional Brain Imaging and its Impact on Surrogate End-of-Life Decision-Making.Jon B. Eisenberg - 2008 - Neuroethics 1 (2):75-83.
    The article addresses the potential impact of functional brain imaging (functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron-emission tomography) on surrogate end-of-life decision-making in light of varying state-law definitions of consciousness, some of which define awareness behaviorally and others functionally. The article concludes that, in light of admonitions by neuroscientists that functional brain imaging cannot yet replace behavioral evaluation to determine the existence of consciousness, state legislatures, courts and drafters of written advance healthcare directives should consider treating behavior, not (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  4.  28
    A Legal and Ethical Analysis of the Effects of Triggering Conditions on Surrogate Decision-Making in End-of-Life Care in the US.J. Clint Parker & Daniel S. Goldberg - 2016 - HEC Forum 28 (1):11-33.
    The central claim of this paper is that American states’ use of so-called “triggering conditions” to regulate surrogate decision-making authority in end-of-life care leaves unresolved a number of important ethical and legal considerations regarding the scope of that authority. The paper frames the issue with a case set in a jurisdiction in which surrogate authority to withdraw life-sustaining treatment is triggered by two specific clinical conditions. The case presents a quandary insofar as the clinical facts do not (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  21
    Mental Competence and Surrogate Decision-Making Towards the End of Life.M. Strätling, V. E. Scharf & P. Schmucker - 2004 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (2):209-215.
    German legislation demands that decisions about the treatment of mentally incompetent patients require an ‘informed consent’. If this was not given by the patient him-/herself before he/she became incompetent, it has to be sought by the physician from a guardian, who has to be formally legitimized before. Additionally this surrogate has to seek the permission of a Court of Guardianship (Vormundschaftsgericht), if he/she intends to consent to interventions, which pose significant risks to the health or the life of the person (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  19
    Ethical Issues in Communication of Diagnosis and End-of-Life Decision-Making Process in Some of the Romanian Roma Communities.Gabriel Roman, Angela Enache, Andrada Pârvu, Rodica Gramma, Ştefana Maria Moisa, Silvia Dumitraş & Beatrice Ioan - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):483-497.
    Medical communication in Western-oriented countries is dominated by concepts of shared decision-making and patient autonomy. In interactions with Roma patients, these behavioral patterns rarely seem to be achieved because the culture and ethnicity have often been shown as barriers in establishing an effective and satisfying doctor–patient relationship. The study aims to explore the Roma’s beliefs and experiences related to autonomy and decision-making process in the case of a disease with poor prognosis. Forty-eight Roma people from two (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7.  12
    Mediation and Surrogate Decision-Making for LGBTQ Families in the Absence of an Advance Directive: Comment on “Ethical Challenges in End-of-Life Care for GLBTI Individuals” by Colleen Cartwright.Lance Wahlert & Autumn Fiester - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (3):365-367.
    In this commentary on a clinical ethics case pertaining to a same-sex couple that does not have explicit surrogate decision-making or hospital-visitation rights (in the face of objections from the family-of-origin of one of the queer partners), the authors invoke contemporary legal and policy standards on LGBTQ health care in the United States and abroad. Given this historical moment in which some clinical rights are guaranteed for LGBTQ families whilst others are in transition, the authors advocate for the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  8.  50
    End-of-Life Decision-Making in Canada: The Report by the Royal Society of Canada Expert Panel on End-of-Life Decision-Making.Udo Schüklenk, Johannes J. M. van Delden, Jocelyn Downie, Sheila A. M. Mclean, Ross Upshur & Daniel Weinstock - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (s1):1-73.
    ABSTRACTThis report on end‐of‐life decisionmaking in Canada was produced by an international expert panel and commissioned by the Royal Society of Canada. It consists of five chapters.Chapter 1 reviews what is known about end‐of‐life care and opinions about assisted dying in Canada.Chapter 2 reviews the legal status quo in Canada with regard to various forms of assisted death.Chapter 3 reviews ethical issues pertaining to assisted death. The analysis is grounded in core values central to Canada's constitutional order.Chapter 4 (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  9. Is the Doctrine of Double Effect Irrelevant in End-of-Life Decision Making?Peter Allmark, Mark Cobb, B. Jane Liddle & Angela Mary Tod - 2010 - Nursing Philosophy 11 (3):170-177.
    In this paper, we consider three arguments for the irrelevance of the doctrine of double effect in end-of-life decision making. The third argument is our own and, to that extent, we seek to defend it. The first argument is that end-of-life decisions do not in fact shorten lives and that therefore there is no need for the doctrine in justification of these decisions. We reject this argument; some end-of-life decisions clearly shorten lives. The second is (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10.  86
    The Attitudes of Neonatal Professionals Towards End-of-Life Decision-Making for Dying Infants in Taiwan.Li-Chi Huang, Chao-Huei Chen, Hsin-Li Liu, Ho-Yu Lee, Niang-Huei Peng, Teh-Ming Wang & Yue-Cune Chang - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (6):382-386.
    The purposes of research were to describe the neonatal clinicians' personal views and attitudes on neonatal ethical decision-making, to identify factors that might affect these attitudes and to compare the attitudes between neonatal physicians and neonatal nurses in Taiwan. Research was a cross-sectional design and a questionnaire was used to reach different research purposes. A convenient sample was used to recruit 24 physicians and 80 neonatal nurses from four neonatal intensive care units in Taiwan. Most participants agreed with (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  11. Grief and End-of-Life Surrogate Decision Making.Michael Cholbi - 2017 - In John K. Davis (ed.), Ethics at the End of Life: New Issues and Arguments. New York: Routledge. pp. 201-217.
    Because an increasing number of patients have medical conditions that render them incompetent at making their own medical choices, more and more medical choices are now made by surrogates, often patient family members. However, many studies indicate that surrogates often do not discharge their responsibilities adequately, and in particular, do not choose in accordance with what those patients would have chosen for themselves, especially when it comes to end-of-life medical choices. This chapter argues that a significant part of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12.  28
    End-of-Life Care and Pragmatic Decision Making: A Bioethical Perspective.D. Micah Hester - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    Every one of us will die, and the processes we go through will be our own - unique to our own experiences and life stories. End-of-Life Care and Pragmatic Decision Making provides a pragmatic philosophical framework based on a radically empirical attitude toward life and death. D. Micah Hester takes seriously the complexities of experiences and argues that when making end-of-life decisions, healthcare providers ought to pay close attention to the narratives of patients and the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  13.  14
    Doctors’ Perceptions of How Resource Limitations Relate to Futility in End-of-Life Decision Making: A Qualitative Analysis.Eliana Close, Ben P. White, Lindy Willmott, Cindy Gallois, Malcolm Parker, Nicholas Graves & Sarah Winch - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (6):373-379.
    ObjectiveTo increase knowledge of how doctors perceive futile treatments and scarcity of resources at the end of life. In particular, their perceptions about whether and how resource limitations influence end-of-life decision making. This study builds on previous work that found some doctors include resource limitations in their understanding of the concept of futility.SettingThree tertiary hospitals in metropolitan Brisbane, Australia.DesignQualitative study using in-depth, semistructured, face-to-face interviews. Ninety-six doctors were interviewed in 11 medical specialties. Transcripts of the interviews were (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  14.  36
    Quality of Ethical Guidelines and Ethical Content in Clinical Guidelines: The Example of End-of-Life Decision-Making.D. Strech & J. Schildmann - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (7):390-396.
    Background While there are many guidelines on how to make ethical decisions at the end of life, there is little evidence regarding the quality of this sort of ethical guidelines. Objectives First, this study aims to demonstrate the conceptual transferability of the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) instrument for the quality assessment of ethical guidelines. Second, it aims to illustrate the status quo of the quality of guidelines on end-of-life decision-making by using the AGREE (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  15. Perspectives and Experience of Healthcare Professionals on Diagnosis, Prognosis, and End-of-Life Decision Making in Patients with Disorders of Consciousness.Catherine Rodrigue, Richard J. Riopelle, James L. Bernat & Eric Racine - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (1):25-36.
    In the care of patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC), some ethical difficulties stem from the challenges of accurate diagnosis and the uncertainty of prognosis. Current neuroimaging research on these disorders could eventually improve the accuracy of diagnoses and prognoses and therefore change the context of end-of-life decision making. However, the perspective of healthcare professionals on these disorders remains poorly understood and may constitute an obstacle to the integration of research. We conducted a qualitative study involving healthcare (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  16.  52
    Influence of Physicians' Life Stances on Attitudes to End-of-Life Decisions and Actual End-of-Life Decision-Making in Six Countries.J. Cohen, J. van Delden, F. Mortier, R. Lofmark, M. Norup, C. Cartwright, K. Faisst, C. Canova, B. Onwuteaka-Philipsen & J. Bilsen - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (4):247-253.
    Aim: To examine how physicians’ life stances affect their attitudes to end-of-life decisions and their actual end-of-life decision-making.Methods: Practising physicians from various specialties involved in the care of dying patients in Belgium, Denmark, The Netherlands, Sweden, Switzerland and Australia received structured questionnaires on end-of-life care, which included questions about their life stance. Response rates ranged from 53% in Australia to 68% in Denmark. General attitudes, intended behaviour with respect to two hypothetical patients, and actual behaviour (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  17.  6
    Beyond Cultural Stereotyping: Views on End-of-Life Decision Making Among Religious and Secular Persons in the USA, Germany, and Israel.Mark Schweda, Silke Schicktanz, Aviad Raz & Anita Silvers - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):13.
    End-of-life decision making constitutes a major challenge for bioethical deliberation and political governance in modern democracies: On the one hand, it touches upon fundamental convictions about life, death, and the human condition. On the other, it is deeply rooted in religious traditions and historical experiences and thus shows great socio-cultural diversity. The bioethical discussion of such cultural issues oscillates between liberal individualism and cultural stereotyping. Our paper confronts the bioethical expert discourse with public moral attitudes. The paper (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  18.  26
    The Impact of Regional Culture on Intensive Care End of Life Decision Making: An Israeli Perspective From the ETHICUS Study.F. D. Ganz - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (4):196-199.
    Background: Decisions of patients, families, and health care providers about medical care at the end of life depend on many factors, including the societal culture. A pan-European study was conducted to determine the frequency and types of end of life practices in European intensive care units , including those in Israel. Several results of the Israeli subsample were different to those of the overall sample.Objective: The objective of this article was to explore these differences and provide a possible explanation based (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  19.  12
    Finnish Doctors and the Realisation of Patient Autonomy in the Context of End of Life Decision Making.H.-M. Hilden - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (6):316-320.
    Patient autonomy is a fundamental principle in end of life decision making. However, its realisation may take a variety of forms. Discourse analysis was conducted in a qualitative interview study of 19 physicians. The physicians made use of three different discourses, each of which contained a specific understanding of patient autonomy and a physician’s proper activities in the context of end of life decision making.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  43
    End-of-Life Decision Making in Taiwan: Healthcare Practice is Rooted in Local Culture and Laws That Should Be Adjusted to Patients' Best Interests.Siew Tzuh Tang - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (6):387-388.
    The observed Taiwanese neonatal professionals' more conservative attitudes than their worldwide colleagues towards end-of-life (EOL) decision making may stem from cultural attitudes toward death in children and concerns about medicolegal liability. Healthcare practice is rooted in local culture and laws; however that should be adjusted to patients' best interests. Improving Taiwanese neonatal professionals' knowledge and competence in EOL care may minimize ethical dilemmas, allow appropriate EOL care decision making, avoid infants' suffering, and ease parents' bereavement (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21.  23
    Working with Children in End-of-Life Decision Making.Joanne Whitty-Rogers, Marion Alex, Cathy MacDonald, Donna Pierrynowski Gallant & Wendy Austin - 2009 - Nursing Ethics 16 (6):743-758.
    Traditionally, physicians and parents made decisions about children’s health care based on western practices. More recently, with legal and ethical development of informed consent and recognition for decision making, children are becoming active participants in their care. The extent to which this is happening is however blurred by lack of clarity about what children — of diverse levels of cognitive development — are capable of understanding. Moreover, when there are multiple surrogate decision makers, parental and professional conflict (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  22.  5
    Bioethical Implications of End-of-Life Decision-Making in Patients with Dementia: A Tale of Two Societies.Peter P. De Deyn, Arnoldo S. Kraus-Weisman, Latife Salame-Khouri & Jaime D. Mondragón - 2020 - Monash Bioethics Review 38 (1):49-67.
    End-of-life decision-making in patients with dementia is a complex topic. Belgium and the Netherlands have been at the forefront of legislative advancement and progressive societal changes concerning the perspectives toward physician-assisted death. Careful consideration of clinical and social aspects is essential during the end-of-life decision-making process in patients with dementia. Geriatric assent provides the physician, the patient and his family the opportunity to end life with dignity. Unbearable suffering, decisional competence, and awareness of memory (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  19
    Finnish Nurses' Interpretations of Patient Autonomy in the Context of End-of-Life Decision Making.Hanna-Mari Hildén & Marja-Liisa Honkasalo - 2006 - Nursing Ethics 13 (1):41-51.
    Our aim was to study how nurses interpret patient autonomy in end-of-life decision making. This study built on our previous quantitative study, which evaluated the experiences of and views on end-of-life decision making of a representative sample of Finnish nurses taken from the whole country. We performed qualitative interviews with 17 nurses and analysed these using discourse analysis. In their talk, the nurses demonstrated three different discourses, namely, the ‘supporter’, the ‘analyst’ and the ‘practical’ (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  24.  30
    End of Life Decision Making, Policy and the Criminal Justice System: Untrained Carers Assuming Responsibility (UCARes) and Their Uncertain Legal Liabilities.Robin Mackenzie & H. Biggs - 2006 - Genomics, Society and Policy 2 (1):118-128.
    This article will explore some previously unrecognised legal and ethical issues associated with informal care-giving and criminal justice in the context of end of life decision-making. It was prompted by a recent case in Leeds Crown Court, which raises important issues for the people who care for their loved ones at home and for the criminal justice system more generally. Government figures estimate that over 5.2 million Britons are responsible for the care of relatives or loved ones. In (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25.  8
    Palliative Care Nursing Involvement in End-of-Life Decision-Making: Qualitative Secondary Analysis.Pablo Hernández-Marrero, Emília Fradique & Sandra Martins Pereira - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1680-1695.
    Background: Nurses are the largest professional group in healthcare and those who make more decisions. In 2014, the Committee on Bioethics of the Council of Europe launched the “Guide on the decision-making process regarding medical treatment in end-of-life situations”, aiming at improving decision-making processes and empowering professionals in making end-of-life decisions. The Guide does not mention nurses explicitly. Objectives: To analyze the ethical principles most valued by nurses working in palliative care when (...) end-of-life decisions and investigate if they are consistent with the framework and recommendations of the Guide; to identify what disputed/controversial issues are more frequent in these nurses’ current end-of-life care practices. Design: Qualitative secondary analysis. Participants/context: Three qualitative datasets including 32 interviews from previous studies with nurses working in palliative care in Portugal. Ethical consideration: Ethical approval was obtained from the Ethics Research Lab of the Instituto de Bioética. Ethical procedures are thoroughly described. Findings: All participant nurses referred to autonomy as an ethical principle paramount in end-of-life decision-making. They were commonly involved in end-of-life decision-making. Palliative sedation and communication were the most mentioned disputed/controversial issues. Discussion: Autonomy was highly valued in end-of-life care and decision-making. Nurses expressed major concerns in assessing patients’ preferences, wishes, and promoting advance care planning. Nurses working in palliative care in Portugal were highly involved in end-of-life decision-making. These processes embraced a collective, inclusive approach. Palliative sedation was the most mentioned disputed issue, which is aligned with previous findings. Communication also emerged as a sensitive ethical issue; it is surprising, however, that only three nurses referred to it. Conclusion: While the Guide does not explicitly mention nurses in its content, this study shows that nurses working in palliative care in Portugal are involved in these processes. Further research is needed on nurses’ involvement and practices in end-of-life decision-making. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  17
    Are Advance Directives Helpful for Good End of Life Decision Making: A Cross Sectional Survey of Health Professionals.Eimantas Peicius, Aurelija Blazeviciene & Raimondas Kaminskas - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):40.
    This paper joins the debate over changes in the role of health professionals when applying advance directives to manage the decision-making process at the end of life care. Issues in relation to advance directives occur in clinical units in Lithuania; however, it remains one of the few countries in the European Union where the discussion on advance directives is not included in the health-care policy-making agenda. To encourage the discussion of advance directives, a study was designed to (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Three Female Faces : The Law of End-of-Life Decision Making in America.Kathy L. Cerminara - 2008 - In James L. Werth & Dean Blevins (eds.), Decision Making Near the End of Life: Issues, Development, and Future Directions. Brunner-Routledge.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Adolescent End-of-Life Decision-Making: Family-Centered Advance Care Planning. Richard & Maureen E. Lyon - 2008 - In James L. Werth & Dean Blevins (eds.), Decision Making Near the End of Life: Issues, Development, and Future Directions. Brunner-Routledge.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Family End-of-Life Decision Making.Sharla Wells-DiGregorio - 2008 - In James L. Werth & Dean Blevins (eds.), Decision Making Near the End of Life: Issues, Development, and Future Directions. Brunner-Routledge.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. The Possible Impact of Mental Health Issues on End-of-Life Decision Making.James L. Werth Jr - 2008 - In James L. Werth & Dean Blevins (eds.), Decision Making Near the End of Life: Issues, Development, and Future Directions. Brunner-Routledge.
  31.  1
    End-of-Life Care Ethical Decision-Making: Shiite Scholars' Views.Mina Mobasher, Kiarash Aramesh, Farzaneh Zahedi, Nouzar Nakhaee, Mamak Tahmasebi & Bagher Larijani - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics and History of Medicine 7 (1).
    Recent advances in life-sustaining treatments and technologies, have given rise to newly-emerged, critical and sometimes, controversial questions regarding different aspects of end-of-life decision-making and care. Since religious values are among the most influential factors in these decisions, the present study aimed to examine the Islamic scholars' views on end-of-life care. A structured interview based on six main questions on ethical decision-making in end-of-life care was conducted with eight Shiite experts in Islamic studies, and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  21
    Social Values as an Independent Factor Affecting End of Life Medical Decision Making.Charles J. Cohen, Yifat Chen, Hedi Orbach, Yossi Freier-Dror, Gail Auslander & Gabriel S. Breuer - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (1):71-80.
    Research shows that the physician’s personal attributes and social characteristics have a strong association with their end-of-life decision making. Despite efforts to increase patient, family and surrogate input into EOL decision making, research shows the physician’s input to be dominant. Our research finds that physician’s social values, independent of religiosity, have a significant association with physician’s tendency to withhold or withdraw life sustaining, EOL treatments. It is suggested that physicians employ personal social values in their (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  33.  15
    By-Person Factor Analysis in Clinical Ethical Decision Making: Q Methodology in End-of-Life Care Decisions.William Wong, Arnold R. Eiser, Robert G. Mrtek & Paul S. Heckerling - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (3):W8-W22.
    Objective: To determine the usefulness of Q methodology to locate and describe shared subjective influences on clinical decision making among participant physicians using hypothetical cases containing common ethical issues. Design: Qualitative study using by-person factor analysis of subjective Q sort data matrix. Setting: University medical center. Participants: Convenience sample of internal medicine attending physicians and house staff (n = 35) at one midwestern academic health sciences center. Interventions: Presented with four hypothetical cases involving urgent decision making (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  9
    A Legal and Ethical Analysis of the Effects of Triggering Conditions on Surrogate Decision-Making in End-of-Life Care in the US.Daniel S. Goldberg & J. Clint Parker - 2016 - HEC Forum 28 (1):11-33.
    The central claim of this paper is that American states’ use of so-called “triggering conditions” to regulate surrogate decision-making authority in end-of-life care leaves unresolved a number of important ethical and legal considerations regarding the scope of that authority. The paper frames the issue with a case set in a jurisdiction in which surrogate authority to withdraw life-sustaining treatment is triggered by two specific clinical conditions. The case presents a quandary insofar as the clinical facts do not (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35.  5
    Prediction of Life-Story Narrative for End-of-Life Surrogate’s Decision-Making is Inadequate: A Q-Methodology Study.Muhammad M. Hammami, Kafa Abuhdeeb, Muhammad B. Hammami, Sophia J. S. De Padua & Areej Al-Balkhi - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):28.
    Substituted judgment assumes adequate knowledge of patient’s mind-set. However, surrogates’ prediction of individual healthcare decisions is often inadequate and may be based on shared background rather than patient-specific knowledge. It is not known whether surrogate’s prediction of patient’s integrative life-story narrative is better. Respondents in 90 family pairs rank-ordered 47 end-of-life statements as life-story narrative measure and completed instruments on decision-control preference and healthcare-outcomes acceptability as control measures, from respondent’s view and predicted pair’s view. They also scored their (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  42
    Acculturation and End-of-Life Decision Making: Comparison of Japanese and Japanese-American Focus Groups.Seiji Bito, Shinji Matsumura, Marjorie Kagawa Singer, Lisa S. Meredith, Shunichi Fukuhara & Neil S. Wenger - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (5):251–262.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37.  23
    Socially and Temporally Extended End-of-Life Decision-Making Process for Dementia Patients.Osamu Muramoto - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (6):339-343.
    There are two contrasting views on the decision-making for life-sustaining treatment in advanced stages of dementia when the patient is deemed incompetent. One is to respect the patient's precedent autonomy by adhering to advance directives or using the substituted judgement standard. The other is to use the best-interests standard, particularly if the current judgement on what is best for the incapacitated patient contradicts the instructions from the patient's precedent autonomy. In this paper, I argue that the protracted clinical (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  38.  37
    'End-of-Life' Decision Making Within Intensive Care - Objective, Consistent, Defensible?A. J. Ravenscroft - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (6):435-440.
    Objective—To determine the objectivity, consistency and professional unanimity in the initiation, continuation and withdrawal of life-prolonging procedures in intensive care–to determine methods, time-scale for withdrawal and communication with both staff and relatives–to explore any professional unease about legality, morality or professional defensibility.Design—A structured questionnaire directed at clinical nurse managers for intensive care.Setting—All intensive care units in the Yorkshire region.Results—The survey reported a lack of consistency and objectivity in decision making in this area, with accompanying unease amongst staff.Conclusions—There is (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  1
    Conflict Between Autonomy and Beneficence in Adolescent End-of-Life Decision Making.K. Sarah Hoehn - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (1):55-60.
    The ethics of adolescent decision making is a complicated mine­field with laws that vary from state to state. The case of a fourteen-year-old girl, who simultaneously was diagnosed with cancer and discovered she was pregnant, highlights several weaknesses in our current approach to adolescent decision making in the context of pregnancy. In addition, adolescents with life-limiting conditions face similar challenges that can be examined through the framework of Catholic doctrine.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  18
    The Potential Impact of Decision Role and Patient Age on End-of-Life Treatment Decision Making.B. J. Zikmund-Fisher, H. P. Lacey & A. Fagerlin - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (5):327-331.
    Background: Recent research demonstrates that people sometimes make different medical decisions for others than they would make for themselves. This finding is particularly relevant to end-of-life decisions, which are often made by surrogates and require a trade-off between prolonging life and maintaining quality of life. We examine the impact of decision role, patient age, decision maker age and multiple individual differences on these treatment decisions. Methods: Participants read a scenario about a terminally ill cancer patient faced with (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41.  16
    Patient Participation in Decision Making at the End of Life as Seen by a Close Relative.Eva Sahlberg-Blom, Britt-Marie Ternestedt & Jan-Erik Johansson - 2000 - Nursing Ethics 7 (4):293-313.
    The aim of the present study was to describe variations in patient participation in decisions about care planning during the final phase of life for a group of gravely ill patients, and how the different actors’ manner of acting promotes or impedes patient participation. Thirty-seven qualitative research interviews were conducted with relatives of the patients. The patients’ participation in the decisions could be categorized into four variations: self-determination, co-determination, delegation and nonparticipation. The manner in which patients, relatives and caregivers acted (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  42.  71
    Patient Participation in Decision Making at the End of Life as Seen by a Close Relative.E. Sahlberg-Blom, B. -M. Ternestedt & J. -E. Johansson - 2000 - Nursing Ethics 7 (4):296-313.
    The aim of the present study was to describe variations in patient participation in decisions about care planning during the final phase of life for a group of gravely ill patients, and how the different actors’ manner of acting promotes or impedes patient participation. Thirty-seven qualitative research interviews were conducted with relatives of the patients. The patients’ participation in the decisions could be categorized into four variations: self-determination, co-determination, delegation and nonparticipation. The manner in which patients, relatives and caregivers acted (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43.  50
    End-of-Life Decision Making Across Cultures.Robert H. Blank - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (2):201-214.
    Even more so than in other areas of medicine, issues at the end of life elucidate the importance of religion and culture, as well as the role of the family and other social structures, in how these issues are framed. This article presents an overview of the variation in end-of-life treatment issues across 12 highly disparate countries. It finds that many assumptions held in the western bioethics literature are not easily transferred to other cultural settings.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  44.  40
    Decision Making Near the End of Life: Issues, Development, and Future Directions.James L. Werth & Dean Blevins (eds.) - 2008 - Brunner-Routledge.
    Case studies and first-person stories about decision-making, written by professionals in the field, bring a uniquely personal touch to this valuable text.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  35
    Quality of Life: The Contested Rhetoric of Resource Allocation and End-of-Life Decision Making.David Nantais & Mark Kuczewski - 2004 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (6):651 – 664.
    The term "quality of life" has a long history in the bioethics literature. It is usually used in one of two contexts: in resource allocation discussions in the hope of arriving at an objective measure of the worth of an intervention; and in end-of-life discussions as a concept that can justify the forgoing of life-sustaining treatment. In both contexts, the term has valid uses as it is meant to measure the efficacy of a treatment. However, the term has the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46.  40
    End of Life Decision-Making in Neonatal Care.C. April & M. Parker - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (3):126-127.
    Critical care of neonatesThe recently published report of the Nuffield Council on Bioethics, Critical care decisions in fetal and neonatal medicine, is a valuable contribution to the discussion of decision making in the critical care of neonates. Drawing upon medical evidence, the working party highlights the many practical difficulties arising in neonatal care and by setting out clearly the nature of the ethical and other issues arising in this area of medicine, and their relationship with neonatal development, the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47.  83
    Clinical Ethics: Autonomy at the End of Life: Life-Prolonging Treatment in Nursing Homes—Relatives’ Role in the Decision-Making Process.A. Dreyer, R. Forde & P. Nortvedt - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (11):672-677.
    Background: The increasing number of elderly people in nursing homes with failing competence to give consent represents a great challenge to healthcare staff’s protection of patient autonomy in the issues of life-prolonging treatment, hydration, nutrition and hospitalisation. The lack of national guidelines and internal routines can threaten the protection of patient autonomy. Objectives: To place focus on protecting patient autonomy in the decision-making process by studying how relatives experience their role as substitute decision-makers. Design: A qualitative descriptive (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  48.  16
    Are the Distinctions Drawn in the Debate About End-of-Life Decision Making “Principled”? If Not, How Much Does It Matter?Yale Kamisar - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (1):66-84.
    The current ethical-legal consensus — prohibiting assisted suicide and euthanasia, but (1) allowing patients to forgo all life-saving treatment, and (2) permitting pain relief that increases the risk of death — is a means of having it both ways. This is how we often make “tragic choices.”.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  49. Jewish Law and End-of-Life Decision Making: A Case Report.Craig D. Blinderman - 2007 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 18 (4):384.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Commentary on``Jewish Law and End-of-Life Decision Making''.Fred Rosner - 2007 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 18 (4):396.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000